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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ JanusView Options:  |  |  | 

Janus

Janus was the Roman god of gates, doors, doorways, time, beginnings, and endings. He is depicted with two faces in opposite directions; one looks back into the past, while the other simultaneously looks forward into the future. He is the namesake of the month January.


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

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Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI86586. Silver dilitron, SNG ANS 518; SNG Cop 717; SNG Mnchen 1126; BMC Sicily p. 186, 283; Weber 1644; HGC 2 1373 (R2), VF, well centered, very dark toning, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.226 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 317 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣI-ΩN, laureate Janiform female head, two dolphins nose to nose on right; reverse horse galloping right, barley ear right above, N below; rare; $400.00 (340.00)


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 550 - 470 B.C.

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Philonome, the second wife of King Cycnus of Colonae, falsely accused her stepson Tenes of rape, using the flutist Eumolpus as witness. Cycnus believed the accusation and tried to kill Tenes and his sister Hemithea by placing them both in a chest, which was set into the ocean. However, the chest landed on the island of Leucophrye, where they made Tenes their king and renamed the island Tenedos. Cycnus later learned the truth, killed Eumolpus, and buried Philonome alive. When Cycnus' ship landed at Tenedos in hopes of reconciliation, Tenes rebuffed him and cut the mooring with a labrys. Tenes fought for the Trojans in the Trojan War and was slain by Achilles. After the war, Agamemnon permitted the Trojan prisoners to build a city north of Mycenea. The city was called Tenea and they founded a sanctuary where sacrifices were offered to Tenes. No flute player was allowed to enter the sacred precinct, and the name of Achilles was not to be uttered. Map of Troas
GS83935. Silver obol, SNG Cop 509; SNGvA 1587; SNG Mnchen 340; SNG Tbingen 2677; BMC Troas p. 91, 7; Rosen 536; Weber 5448, HGC 6 381; SGCV II 5151, VF, tight flan, uneven toning, edge crack, weight 0.584 g, maximum diameter 8.3 mm, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 550 - 470 B.C.; obverse janiform head of a diademed female left and laureate bearded male right; reverse labrys (double axe), T-E divided by handle, all within an incuse square, no linear border; ex Wilson H Guertin; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, C. Vibius C.F. Pansa, 90 B.C.

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In 90 B.C., Rome barely managed to stave off total defeat in the Social War. The Italians were denied citizenship and, despite making up over half the Roman army, were denied a fair share of the booty and lands. They rebelled and raised an army of 100,000 battle-hardened soldiers. After Roman victories and citizenship concessions, the war was nearly over by 88 B.C.
RR59575. Copper as, Crawford 342/7d; Sydenham 690b; SRCV I 744, F, weight 7.587 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I above; reverse ROMA, three galley prows right, C VIBI AV (AV ligate) in exergue, I right; $60.00 (51.00)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR76436. Bronze as, cf. McCabe Anonymous K2, Crawford 198/1a, Sydenham 143, BMCRR 217, SRCV I 712, F, pitting, weight 28.660 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 270o, Rome(?) mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; scarce; $55.00 (46.75)


Roman Republic, L. Saufeius, 152 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR68445. Bronze as, SRCV I 720, Crawford 204/2, Sydenham 385, BMCRR Rome 836, aF, weight 23.522 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 152 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, crescent over LSAVF (VF ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $45.00 (38.25)







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Catalog current as of Sunday, September 23, 2018.
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Janus