Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Hanukkah!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Christmas!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958.

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Janus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Janus

Janus was the Roman god of gates, doors, doorways, time, beginnings, and endings. He is depicted with two faces in opposite directions; one looks back into the past, while the other simultaneously looks forward into the future. He is the namesake of the month January.


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, 225 - 215 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Crawford describes obverse as the laureate janiform head of the Dioscuri and explains, "the Dioscuri had acquired the role of protectors of the Roman people as a result of their intervention on the Roman side at the Battle of Lake Regillus. Explaining the reverse, he states, "Jupiter was the god in whose honour a Roman triumph was held." The depiction is probably based on the statue of Jupiter in a quadriga erected on the ridge of the Capitoline Temple in 296 B.C.
SH76566. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 28/3, Sydenham 64, RSC I 23, SRCV I 31, Choice gVF, attractive style, well struck, light rose toning, traces of mint luster, small die crack on chin, minor flan flaws and contact marks, weight 6.800 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The reverse legend translates, "The gates of Janus' temple are closed because peace of the Roman people is set on both land and sea." On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war the doors of the 'Twin Janus' were ceremonially closed, an event Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65 - 67 A.D. -- Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1 by David R. Sear
SH45882. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 354, BnF I 429, Mac Dowall WCN 171, Cohen I 139, BMCRE I -, Hunter I -, SRCV I -, VF, exceptional style, scratches in fields, weight 25.185 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 67 A.D.; obverse IMP NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P XIII PP, laureate head right; reverse PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, lateral view of the Temple of Janus with garland over closed doors within arch, temple front on the left, the right side of the temple with long latticed window to the right, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking at sides; ex A H Baldwin & Sons (Fixed Price List Winter 2008, £1600), ex MŁnzhandlung Ritter; SOLD


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, c. 225 - 215 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
During the period this coin was struck Rome fought two major wars simultaneously: the First Macedonian War against Philip V and the Second Punic War against Hannibal. Rome would later be victorious in both conflicts and emerge as the sole superpower in the Mediterranean.
SH67900. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 30/1; Sydenham 64b; BMCRR II, p. 133, 94; SRCV I 31, aEF, attractive style, dark toning, weight 6.572 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Italian (Rome?) mint, c. 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, slightly curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory standing on tailboard (the drapery on her lower body visible) with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; scarce; SOLD


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, 225 - 215 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Crawford describes obverse as the laureate janiform head of the Dioscuri and explains, "the Dioscuri had acquired the role of protectors of the Roman people as a result of their intervention on the Roman side at the Battle of Lake Regillus. Explaining the reverse, he states, "Jupiter was the god in whose honour a Roman triumph was held." The depiction is probably based on the statue of Jupiter in a quadriga erected on the ridge of the Capitoline Temple in 296 B.C.
RR49952. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 30/1; Sydenham 64b; BMCRR II, p. 133, 94; SRCV I 31, VF, toned, some pitting and scratches, weight 6.352 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, slightly curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory standing on tailboard (the drapery on her lower body visible) with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Exceptionally fine style. Some of the best Roman engravers worked at the Rome Mint from the late reign of Nero to the early reign of Vespasian and the coins produced at Rome are higher relief and more attractive than those from larger mint at Lugdunum.

A "Tiber Patina," sometimes called a river patina, is technically not a patina at all. Rather, submersion in fresh water has prevented a patina from forming. Shiny original surfaces of the coin often become subdued and grainy.
SH25004. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 264, Cohen I 146, BMCRE I 156, Mac Dowall WCN 148, BnF I 365 var. (CLAVDIVS), SRCV I -, gVF, high relief portrait, nicely centered, a grainy Tiber patina, pitted on the reverse, weight 20.808 g, maximum diameter 34.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 265 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head right, aegis at base of neck; reverse PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT (The gates of Janus' temple are closed because peace (of the Roman people) is set on both land and sea), view of the Temple of Janus from the front left corner, temple front on the right with garland over closed doors within arch, the left side of the temple to the left with long latticed window, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; SOLD


Lampsacus (as Colonia Gemella Iulia Lampsacus), Mysia, c. 45 - 35 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
M. Grant (Grant FITA, p. 246) first and convincingly attributed this type to Lampsacus. P. Brunt (Italian Manpower, p. 600) argues convincingly that the colony was founded by Julius Caesar about 45 B.C. and disappeared after its occupation by Sextus Pompey in 35 B.C. Marcus Turius was the legate (governor) of Asia, 42 - 40 B.C. The countermark is listed in RPC I on other issues of the colony.
RP85355. Bronze as, RPC I 2272 (2 specimens), Grant FITA 246(4), SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; Countermark: Howgego -, F, a little rough with some smoothing, only three specimens known to Forum, weight 4.044 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 45o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 42 - 40 B.C.; obverse head of Janus, C G - I L (Colonia Gemella Iulia Lampsacus) divided across field, countermark: cornucopia, C - C flanking at sides, within a roughly square punch; reverse galley prow right, Q LVCRETI / L PONTI IIVIR (duumvirs) above, M TVRIO LEG (Marcus Turius, legate) below; extremely rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The reverse legend translates, "The gates of Janus' temple are closed because peace of the Roman people is set on both land and sea." On the rare occasions when Rome was not at war the doors of the 'Twin Janus' were ceremonially closed, an event Nero commemorated extensively on the coinage of 65 - 67 A.D. -- Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1 by David R. Sear
SH16508. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 584, BMCRE I -, Mac Dowall WCN 481, VF, light smoothing, weight 25.782 g, maximum diameter 35.5 mm, die axis 225o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head left; reverse PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM, view of the Temple of Janus from the front left corner, temple front on the right with garland over closed doors within arch, the left side of the temple to the left with long latticed window, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; green patina; SOLD


Roman Republic, Spurius Furius, c. 155 - 120 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Sydenham notes of his 371, "The as and triens with the name L. FVRI, quoted by Babelon (i, p. 523) from Riccio, are suspect, the legends having most probably been altered. Crawford identifies both S. FVRI and L. FVRI as modern forgeries (p. 549, note 47). We believe this coin is ancient, not a modern forgery.
RR47799. Bronze as, Sydenham 371 (R6); Crawford p. 549, note 47 (false); SRCV I -, F, weight 26.772 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 155 - 120 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus; I (mark of value) above; reverse prow of galley right, S. FVRI (FVR ligate) above, ROMA in exergue; SOLD


Roman Republic, Sextus Pompey, Younger Son of Pompey the Great, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet, Executed 35 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.) and executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.
SH56000. Bronze as, Sydenham 1044a, BMCRR II Spain 101, Crawford 479/1, Cohen Pompey the Great 16, Sear CRI 336, RPC I 671, SRCV I 1394, VF, weight 24.291 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 90o, uncertain Sicilian mint, c. 43 - 36 B.C.; obverse laureate janiform head with the features of Pompey the Great, MAGN (MA ligate) above; reverse prow of galley right, PIVS above, IMP below; SOLD


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and the Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Threatened by Carthage and dominated by Hiketas, the tyrant of Leontini, Syracusans sent an appeal for help to their mother city, Corinth. By a unanimous vote Corinth selected Timoleon to set sail for Sicily with a few leading citizens of Corinth and a small troop of Greek mercenaries. After defeating Hiketas, Timoleon put order to Syracuse' affairs and established a democratic government. He repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island. Timoleon then retired without any title or office, though he remained practically supreme. He became blind before his death, but when important issues were under discussion he was carried to the assembly to give his opinion, which was usually accepted. When he died the citizens of Syracuse erected a monument to his memory, afterward surrounded with porticoes, and a gymnasium called Timoleonteum.
GI86586. Silver dilitron, SNG ANS 518; SNG Cop 717; SNG MŁnchen 1126; BMC Sicily p. 186, 283; Weber 1644; HGC 2 1373 (R2), VF, well centered, very dark toning, porosity, edge crack, weight 1.226 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 317 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣI-ΩN, laureate Janiform female head, two dolphins nose to nose on right; reverse horse galloping right, barley ear right above, N below; rare; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.




Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 11, 2019.
Page created in 1.032 seconds.
Janus