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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Late Roman SilverView Options:  |  |  | 

Late Roman Silver

Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

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Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I, and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians. In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens was defeated by the Goths at the catastrophic battle of Hadrianople, where he lost his life and two-thirds of the Roman army was killed.
RS84407. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Trier 27(e)1, RSC V 109a, Hunter V 7, SRCV V 19675, VF, well centered, toned, flan cracks, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 1.963 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 28 Mar 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALEN-S P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on throne, Victory on globe in Roma's right hand, scepter or spear without point vertical in her left hand, Victory extends wreath in right hand and holds palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, TRPS in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (142.40)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX abbreviates Votis Tricennalibus Multis Quadragennalibus advertising that Constantius had completed his vows (prayers) to thank God for the 30th anniversary of his rule and made more vows to God that he might help him successfully rule to his 40th anniversary.
RL84413. Silver siliqua, RIC VIII Arles 261/291, RSC V 342-3r, SRCV V 17951, VF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 1.706 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, 357 - 3 Nov 361 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX in wreath, PCON (Constantia) in exergue; $120.00 (106.80)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit With Julian II Reverse

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This coin combines an obverse die of Constantius II, 337 - 361, with a reverse die of Julian II, 360 - 363 A.D. The unlikely hybrid of types from different emperors and issues, the light weight, and the flan flaw on the reverse indicate it is a plated ancient counterfeit.

Ancient counterfeits often have mismatched obverses and reverses. Transfer dies were made using genuine coins which were destroyed in the process. Since making each die destroyed the coin, the same coin could not be used to make both dies. The destroyed coins were undoubtedly melted to contribute to the silver foil plate.

Unlike counterfeit denarii, counterfeit siliqua are very rare. Siliqua are so thin, that striking counterfeits with a bronze core apparently could not provide an economic benefit worth the effort and risk.
RS79849. Fouree silver plated reduced siliqua, cf. official, Lugdunum mint, silver, RIC VIII Constantius II 180 (for obverse) and RIC VIII Julian II 233 (for reverse), aVF, well centered on a tight flan cutting off parts of legend, marks, scratches, corrosion, edge crack, edge chips, weight 1.385 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 180o, illegal mint, c. 360 - 365 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, eagle in circle closing wreath at the top, CONST in exergue; $110.00 (97.90)


Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

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In England, where many siliquae are found clipped, silver Roman coins apparently continued to circulate long after the Empire abandoned the island. Clipping may not have been primarily intended to deviously obtain a little silver. Clipping may have actually been performed primarily to make the weight and value equivalent to contemporary coins in the medieval period.
RS84417. Silver siliqua, SRCV V 19675, cf. RIC IX Trier 27b, 27e, and 45a-b, RSC V 109a-c, Hunter V 7, VF, toned, scratches, clipped, weight 1.251 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 368 - 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on throne, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left, TRPS[?] in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (71.20)







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Catalog current as of Sunday, September 24, 2017.
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Late Roman Silver