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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Antiquities ▸ Central Asian AntiquitiesView Options:  |  |  | 

Central Asian Antiquities

India, Stone Head of a Bodhisattva, c. 10th Century A.D.

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The bodhisattva, a popular subject in Buddhist art, is someone who, motivated by great compassion, has a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings. In early Indian Buddhism, bodhisattva usually referred specifically to the Buddha Shakyamuni in his former lives.
AH59767. India, stone head of a bodhisattva, 9.5 cm tall, c. 10th century A.D., ex New Jersey collection, ex European dealer (c. 1980); $270.00 (Ä240.30)


Indus Valley, Terracotta Mother Goddess Bust, 3rd Millennium B.C.

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Fertility cults were common in the prehistoric cultures of the Indus Valley and the adjacent regions. Invariably female figurines were involved, which are commonly referred to as Mother Goddesses. Female figurines made in terracotta have been found in a large number sites including Nausharo in the Kacchi Plains of Eastern Baluchistan, Nindowari in the Baluchistan Highlands, and Moenjodaro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley.
AE61831. Mother goddess bust, fragment from full figure, $160.00 (Ä142.40)


Indus Valley, Terracotta Zebu Bull, c. 12th - 9th B.C.

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Similar terracotta bulls were found in the more ancient levels of excavations at Mundigak near Kandahar. They were symbols of force and the fecundity of the herd. Zebu are thought to be derived from wild Asian aurochs, which disappeared during the time of the Indus Valley Civilization due to domestication and loss of habitat. The species was introduced into Egypt around 2000 B.C. and to Brazil early in the 20th century.
AE63807. Terracotta Zebu Bull; cf. Casal, p. 32; 9.5 cm (3 3/4") long, missing tip of right horn, charming, c. 12th - 9th B.C.; baked terracotta with applied polychrome, horns and humped back, dark painted features and details; from a Florida dealer; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Casal, J. "Mundigak: l'Afghanistan ŗ l'aurore des civilisations" in Archeologia, No. 13, Nov. 1966, pp. 30 - 37.
Tripathi, V. & Srivastava, A. The Indus Terracottas. (New Delhi, 2014).
Urmila, S. Terracotta Art of Rajasthan (From Pre-Harappan and Harappan Times to the Gupta Period). (New Delhi, 1997).
Zwalf, W. ed. Buddhism Art and Faith. (New York, 1985).

Catalog current as of Saturday, June 24, 2017.
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Central Asian Antiquities