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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Judean & Biblical Coins ▸ Jewish Revolts ▸ Judaea CaptaView Options:  |  |  | 

Judaea Capta

Discontent and inept rule led to open rebellion in 66 A.D. The Romans distracted by the Civil Wars following the death of Nero were unable to put a speedy end to the revolt. But, in 70 A.D. Titus, son of the new Emperor Vespasian captured and sacked Jerusalem and destroyed the temple. Roman Judaea Capta coins commemorate and celebrate the success of Vespasian and Titus against the First Jewish Revolt.


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

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"Judaea Capta" issue. The reverse depicts Vespasian riding in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. The Jewish historian Josephus was present at the festivities and noted, "It is impossible to do justice in the description of the number of things to be seen and to the magnificence of everything that met the eye...The greatest amazement was caused by the floats. Their size gave grounds for alarm about their stability, for many were three or four stories high..On one float the army could be seen pouring inside the walls, on another was a palace running with blood. Others showed defenseless men raising their hands in entreaty, firebrands being hurled at temples or buildings falling on their owners. On yet others were depicted rivers, which, after the destruction and desolation, flowed no longer through tilled fields providing water for men and cattle, but through a land on fire from end to end. It was to such miseries that the Jews doomed themselves by the war..Standing on his individual float was the commander of each of the captured cities showing the way he had been taken prisoner...Spoil in abundance was carried past. None of it compared with that taken from the Temple in Jerusalem...The procession was completed by Vespasian, and, behind him, Titus."
RS86443. Silver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 1559; RPC II 1931; RSC II 643; BMCRE II 512; BnF III 320; Hendin 1491; SRCV I 2279, VF, toned, bumps and marks, tight flan, areas of light corrosion, coppery areas, reverse a little off center, edge cracks, weight 3.170 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse no legend, Vespasian driving triumphal quadriga right, branch and reins in right hand, scepter in left hand; $580.00 (€493.00)
 


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS85572. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf Cappadocia 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, gVF, well centered and struck, toned, light marks, light deposits, weight 1.452 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike advancing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm over left shoulder in left hand; $180.00 (€153.00)
 


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesaraea-Eusebia, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS86472. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1659; Metcalf 17; Sydenham Cappadocia 94; BMC Galatia p. 47, 17; SNGvA 6362, aVF, toned, obverse slightly off center, marks and scratches, weight 1.666 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesaraea-Eusebia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike right, wreath in extended right hand, palm over left shoulder in left hand; ex Vaughn Rare Coin Gallery; $100.00 (€85.00)
 







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REFERENCES

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Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, J-B. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. a Nerva. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 5th Edition. (Amphora, 2010).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 2: Vespasian to Domitian. (London, 1930).
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Meshorer, Y. A Treasury of Jewish Coins from the Persian Period to Bar Kokhba. (Jerusalem, 2001).
Prieur, M. & K. Prieur. The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their fractions from 57 BC to AD 258. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 6: Palestine - South Arabia. (New York, 1981).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
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Judaea Capta Coins