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Coins and Antiquities Under $50

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Constantine Era Bronze Coin in Plastic Holder, 307 - 364 A.D.

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The coin in the photo is randomly selected example, not the actual coin you will receive.
SL35619. Bronze coin, Constantine and his family, in plastic holder, Fine or better, no grades on holders, one coin; $2.90 SALE |PRICE| $2.61


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00


City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 335 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RL92030. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 12 (also 6th officina), RIC VII Nicomedia 195 (R1), SRCV IV 16521, LRBC I 1120 corr. (dots omitted), Cohen VII 17, VF, well centered and struck, porous, scratches, weight 2.700 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, crescent on wolf's shoulder, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, three vertically aligned dots between two stars above, SMNS in exergue; ex Zurqieh Co.; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $46.00 ON RESERVE


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C., Apameia Civic Coinage

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This rare civic coinage type, without the portrait of the Seleukid King, was only issued for one year, 150 - 149 B.C.

Apameia was on the right bank of the Orontes River, about 55 km (34 mi) to the northwest of Hama, Syria, overlooking the Ghab valley. Originally named Pharmake, it was fortified and enlarged by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 B.C., who renamed it after his Bactrian wife, Apama. The fortress was placed upon a hill; the windings of the Orontes, with the lake and marshes, gave it a peninsular form. Seleucus had his commissariat there with 500 elephants, 30,000 mares, and 300 stallions. The pretender, Diodotus Tryphon, made Apameia the basis of his operations. Located at a strategic crossroads for Eastern commerce, the city flourished to the extent that its population eventually numbered half a million. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis, boasted one of the largest theaters in the Roman world, and a monumental colonnade.
Great Colonnade at Apamea
GB59706. Bronze AE 17, BMC Galatia p. 233, 1, Lindgren-Kovacs 2029, Cohen DCA 134, VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, obverse off center, scratches, edge crack, weight 4.278 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 150 - 149 B.C.; obverse turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right; reverse AΠAMEΩN, warrior advancing left, looking back right, extending right hand, spear and shield in left, ΓΞP (year 163 of Seleucid Era) left; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63310. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Arabia p. 238, 10; Alram IP 619; Sunrise 647 var. (different tiara), VF, uneven toning, weight 0.9499 g, maximum diameter 13.11 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with two rows of pellets enclosing crescent with horns upward, triskeles turning right behind; reverse diadem, two ties laid across center, blundered imitation of an Aramaic legend; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Morgantina as Hispani, Sicily, c. 211 - 185 B.C.

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In 214, during the Second Punic War, Morgantina switched its allegiance from Rome to Carthage. Morgantina remained autonomous until 211, when it became the last Sicilian town to be captured by the Romans. It was given as payment by Rome to a group of Spanish mercenaries, who issued coins with the inscription HISPANORVM. See Kenan Erim, "Morgantina," AJA, vol. 62, no. 1 (Jan., 1958), pp. 79-90.
GB65639. Bronze AE 22, Buttrey Catalog, 253, pl. 7, 18 (same dies); Calciati III p. 341, 1; SNG Cop 1079; SNG ANS 4/II 484, aF, large flan, weight 8.400 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 45o, Morgantina mint, c. 211 - 185 B.C.; obverse C SIC-LIVN, male head right; reverse HISPANORVM, helmeted horseman cantering right, holding spear; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

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Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS65707. Silver hemidrachm, cf. Tyler-Smith, type 1, 210 (with ties); Alram IP 619 var. (same); cf. Sunrise 649 (obol); BMC Arabia p. 238, 16 (same), VF, toned, tight flan, die wear, obverse center weak, light marks, porosity, weight 1.171 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with two rows of pellets enclosing crescent and three pellets, no triskeles behind bust; reverse diadem without ties, blundered illiterate imitation of an Aramaic legend around; apparently unpublished as a hemidrachm; rare variety; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Kingdom of Naples, Phillip III of Spain, 13 September 1598 - 31 March 1621

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Naples was ruled by the Crown of Aragon as part of the Spanish Empire from 1504 to 1714.
ME66316. Bronze 2 cavalli, MIR Napoli 231 (R2), F, uneven strike, tight flan, weight 2.182 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Naples mint, obverse + PHILIPP III D G REX ARA, two flints and two flint locks forming a cross, a flame in each angle; reverse SICILIAE ET HIERVSA, crown, two crossed scepters inside; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

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Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME66338. Billon denaro, MIR 10 347 (R3), Biaggi 493 var. (R), MEC Italy III 643, VF, weight 0.405 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 135o, Apulia, Brindisi mint, early coinage, 1266 - 1278; obverse K DEI GRA REX SCL, cross fleury; reverse + DVC AP ET PRIC CAPE, shield with lis and three pendants, flanked by two small lis; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

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"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66376. Bronze two chalkoi, Kovacs AJN 20 6, Nercessian ACV 159 (Tigranes IV), Bedoukian CCA 154 (same), aF, weight 4.718 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 45o, Damascus(?) mint, 8 - 5 B.C.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara with five points, surrounded by dotted pearls, adorned with star; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, Herakles standing slightly left, nude, right hand resting on grounded club, Nemean lion skin draped on left arm; rare; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00




  



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Under $50