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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis and Decline| ▸ |Macrianus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Macrianus, fall or winter 260 - early 261 A.D.

Macrianus was the son of one of Valerians generals during his campaigns against the Persians. After Valerian was captured, the general Macrianus and the Praetorian Prefect Ballista rallied the troops and inflicted several defeats upon the Persian armies of Shapur, who retreated across the Euphrates. Inspired by this victory, they decided to march against Emperor Gallienus, while leaving the brother of Macrianus Junior, Quietus, in charge of the Eastern provinces. A large army under command of the general Aureolus met them and they were soundly beaten, both the emperor and his father died in the battle.


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Sol Invictus ("Unconquered Sun") was the sun god of the later Roman Empire and a patron of soldiers. In 274 the Roman emperor Aurelian made it an official cult alongside the traditional Roman cults. The god was favored by emperors after Aurelian and appeared on their coins until Constantine. The last inscription referring to Sol Invictus dates to 387 and there were enough devotees in the 5th century that Augustine found it necessary to preach against them. The date 25 December was selected for Christmas to replace the popular Roman festival Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, the "Birthday of the Unconquered Sun."
RA26604. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1741, RSC IV 12, RIC V-2 12 (R2), Hunter 8, SRCV III 10809, Choice VF, full circle centering, original hoard toning, weight 4.531 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOL INVICTO, Sol standing left, nude but for radiate crown and cloak on left shoulder, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; rare; SOLD


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In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RA26601. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1727k, RSC IV 1, RIC V-2 5 (R2), Hunter 1, SRCV III 10798, Choice VF, near full circle centering, weight 4.156 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse AEQVTAS (sic) AVGG, Aequitas standing half left, scales in right hand, scepter in left hand, star left; rare; SOLD


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The empire is history but Rome is still today, the Eternal City.

During the Early Middle Ages, the population fell to a mere 20,000, reducing the sprawling city to groups of inhabited buildings interspersed among large areas of ruins and vegetation.
SH26406. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 11, RIC V-2 11 (R2), SRCV III 10807, Choice gVF, full circle strike, weak reverse center, weight 4.073 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Victory in extended right, spear in left; rare; SOLD


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The style of this piece is clearly different from the usual Antioch mint issues and may be a different eastern mint. In Göbl's work "Moneta Imperii Romanii" covering the Macrianus and Quietus issues, on p. 125 there are a few examples for Macrianus and Quietus with the same style as this coin. Note the shape of the Ms especially and the middle legs are joined and only run half-way the length of the letter, as opposed to the more commonly found split-leg M with all even lengths. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a published proposal for an alternative mint for this issue, although we have heard the Samosata mint in what is now Southeastern Turkey may have been in operation for these. Also, we could not find any examples on-line of this extremely rare type, except for one sold in 2004 by CNG (Electronic Auction 91, Lot 181, also proposing Samosata for the mint), so the published examples by Göbl are the only ones to which I could compare.
SH53621. Bronze antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1742c, RSC IV 12 (R2), RIC V-2 12, aVF, weight 4.067 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (or Samosata?) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SOL INVICTO, Sol standing facing, head left, nude but for radiate crown and cloak over left shoulder and arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; rare; SOLD


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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH27121. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8a, RIC V-2 9 (R2), SRCV III 10803, EF, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet, star in left field; rare; SOLD


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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
SH26592. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 8a, RIC V-2 9 (R2), SRCV III 10803, VF, weight 3.279 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, patera in extended right, scepter in left, eagle at feet, star in left field; near full circle centering; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The empire is history but Rome is still today, the Eternal City.

During the Early Middle Ages, the population fell to a mere 20,000, reducing the sprawling city to groups of inhabited buildings interspersed among large areas of ruins and vegetation.
SH26593. Silvered antoninianus, RSC 11a, RIC V-2 11 (R2), SRCV III 10807, Choice VF, weight 4.132 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Victory in extended right, spear in left, star in left field; near full circle strike; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RA42464. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1727b, RSC IV 1 (R2), RIC V-2 5 (R2), Hunter 1, SRCV III 10798, Choice VF, weight 4.052 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse AEQVTAS (sic) AVGG, Aequitas standing half left, scales in right hand, scepter in left hand, star left; rare; SOLD


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Indulgentia is the personification of clemency, leniency, grace, or favor. This coin may refer to some specific permission or clemency given, or some privilege bestowed by the emperor.
SH27146. Silvered antoninianus, RSC IV 6, RIC V-2 8 (R2), SRCV III 10801, VF, weight 3.634 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse INDVLGENTIAE AVG, Indulgentia seated left, patera extended in right hand, scepter in left hand; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The empire is history but Rome is still today, the Eternal City.

During the Early Middle Ages, the population fell to a mere 20,000, reducing the sprawling city to groups of inhabited buildings interspersed among large areas of ruins and vegetation.
RA83949. Silvered antoninianus, MIR 1738b, RSC IV 11, Hunter IV 5, RIC V-2 11 (R2), SRCV III 10807, Choice aEF, perfect centering on a broad flan, toned, porous, slight die wear, weight 4.304 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Syrian mint, obverse IMP C FVL MACRIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), Roma, helmeted, seated left on shield, Victory in extended right, spear in left, two pellets in exergue; ex Leu Numismatik, web auction 3 (25 Feb 2018), lot 1015; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Göbl, R. Moneta Imperii Romani, Band 35: Die Münzprägung des Kaiser Valerianus I / Gallienus / Saloninus / (253/268), Regalianus (260) un Macrianus / Quietus (260/262). (Vienna, 2000).
Mattingly, H., Sydenham and Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, |Part| II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume Three, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Macrianus