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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Byzantine Coins ▸ Byzantine GoldView Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Gold Coins

Byzantine gold coins are still remarkably affordable. Types with the bust of Christ are very popular. We attempt to keep gold coins of Christ in stock, but demand often exceeds supply.


Byzantine Empire, Anastasius II Artemius, 3 June 713 - November 715

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Anastasius II was originally named Artemius and was an imperial secretary. After the Opsician army in Thrace had overthrown Philippicus, they acclaimed Artemius as Emperor. He chose Anastasius as his regnal name. Soon after, Anastasius II executed the officers who were directly involved in the conspiracy against Philippicus. As the advancing Umayyad Caliphate surrounded the Empire, after diplomacy failed, he undertook the restoration of Constantinople's walls and the rebuilding of the Roman fleet. The death of the Caliph al-Walid I in 715 gave Anastasius an opportunity to turn the tables. He dispatched an army under Leo the Isaurian, afterwards emperor, to invade Syria, and he had his fleet concentrate on Rhodes with orders not only to resist the approach of the enemy but to destroy their naval stores. These troops of the Opsician theme, resenting the Emperor's strict measures, mutinied, slew the admiral John, and proclaimed as emperor Theodosius III, a tax-collector of low extraction. After a six-month siege, Constantinople was taken by Theodosius. Anastasius, who had fled to Nicaea, was eventually compelled to retire to a monastery in Thessalonica. In 719, Anastasius headed a revolt against Leo III, who had succeeded Theodosius. The attempt failed and Anastasius was put to death.
SH86351. Gold solidus, Feg Nomismata 2.F.3 (same rev. die), Morrison BnF 20/Cp/AV/2, DOC II- 2e (not in coll. refs. W.), Wroth BMC 4, Hahn MIB 2, Sommer 19.1, SBCV 1463, gVF, areas not fully struck, tight flan and reverse slightly off center cutting off tops of some legend, bumps and marks, weight 4.318 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 3 Jun 713 Nov 715; obverse d N APTEMIVS ANASTASIVS MVLA, facing crowned and draped bust, globus cruciger in left hand, akakia in right hand; reverse VICTORIA AVSV S, cross potent, on base and three steps, CONOB in exergue; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 196 (7 March 2011), lot 3134 (misattributed); scarce emperor; $1600.00 (1360.00)


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

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Similar types were struck with a short beard, SBCV 344, and without a beard, SBCV 345. This type with a beard is believed to have have been struck only before 1 January 566 A.D. and is very scarce. Bellinger wrote in DOC I, "These bearded coins were presumably struck for the emperors consulship on 1 January following his accession." Justin II was normally clean shaven but this issue was struck when he was bearded in mourning for the death of Justinian I. Berk Gold (1986) lists this bearded type at $800 and Sommer (2010) lists it at €1200 in EF condition. The type without a beard is common and Berk prices it at $400 and Sommer at €550 in EF.
SH86352. Gold solidus, DOC I 2, Berk Gold 59, Hahn MIB II 4, Sommer 5.1, SBCV 344, Morrisson BnF - (p. 127, note 1), Wroth BMC -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, EF, nearly as struck, reverse slightly off center on a broad flan, some legend weak, a few small light scratches, weight 4.489 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, December 566 A.D.(?); obverse D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, bearded, helmeted, and cuirassed bust facing, helmet with crest, trefoil ornament and pendilia, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, shield ornamented with horseman in left hand; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG H (victory of the three emperors, 8th officina), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, wearing crested helmet, aegis on right shoulder, spear in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand, CONOB in exergue; ex MPO - Munten En Postzegel Organisatie (IJsselstein, Netherlands) auction, Nov 2013, lot 226 (misattributed as SBCV 345); very scarce; $700.00 SALE PRICE $630.00 ON RESERVE


Byzantine Empire, Constantine VIII, 15 December 1025 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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SH21620. Gold histamenon nomisma, SBCV 1815; DOC III part 2, 2, Choice EF, weight 4.391 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, obverse + IhS XPS REX REGNANTINM, Christ Pantocrator with gospels; reverse + CWNSTANTIN BASILEWS ROM, bust facing, wearing crown and loros, labarum in right, akakia in left; very scarce; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Adelson, Howard. Light Weight Solidi and Byzantine Trade during the Sixth and Seventh Centuries. ANSNNM 138. (New York, 1957).
Bellinger, A. & P. Grierson, eds. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection. (Washington D.C., 1966 - 1999).
Berk, H. Roman Gold Coins of the Medieval World, 383 - 1453 A.D. (Joliet, IL, 1986).
Feg, F. Corpus of the Nomismata from Anastasius II to John I in Constantinople, 713 - 976. (2007).
Feg, F. "Vom Umgang mit Zufall und Wahrscheinlichkeit in der Numismatischen Forschung" in SNR 76 (1997).
Grierson, P. Byzantine Coins. (London, 1999).
Grierson, P. "Byzantine Gold Bullae, with a Catalogue of those at Dumbarton Oaks" in Dumbarton Oaks Papers 20 (1966).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Hahn, W. & W. Metcalf. Studies in Early Byzantine Gold Coinage. ANSNS 17 (1988).
Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Hennequin, G. Catalogue des monnaies musulmanes de la Bibliotheque Nationale. (Paris, 1985).
Lianta, E. Late Byzantine Coins, 1204 - 1453, in the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. (London, 2009).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothque Nationale. (Paris, 1970).
Sear, D. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Sommer, A. Die Mnzen des Byzantinischen Reiches 491-1453. Mit einem Anhang: Die Mnzen des Kaiserreichs von Trapezunt. (Regenstauf, 2010).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines l'poque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 14).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths, Lombards and of the Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea, and Trebizond in the British Museum. (London, 1911).

Catalog current as of Sunday, February 25, 2018.
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Byzantine Gold