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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Tetrarchy ▸ Galeria ValeriaView Options:  |  |  | 

Galeria Valeria, Augusta, June 293(?) - 311 A.D., Daughter of Diocletian, Second Wife of Galerius

Galeria Valeria was the daughter of Emperor Diocletian and the second wife of Emperor Galerius. After her husband's death, she refused a proposal of marriage by Maximinus Daia. Infuriated he ordered her and her mother Prisca exiled to Syria. Diocletian begged Maximinus to allow his beloved daughter and wife to live with him, but Maximinus refused and imprisoned them in Syria. They escaped and wandered for 15 months in search of refuge before being recognized in the city of Saloniki. A mob seized the pair, dragged them to the town square, beheaded them and dumped their bodies in the sea.


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In 309, a plague, possibly related to anthrax, spread across the Roman Empire, causing a drastic decline in the population. Plagues and population decline were perhaps the greatest cause for the decline of Rome.
RL84389. Billon follis, RIC VI Thessalonica 36, SRCV IV 14592, VF, well centered, dark patina, areas of corrosion, weight 5.182 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed bust, shoulders facing, head right, wearing embroidered robe; reverse VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, raising apple in right hand, raising drapery over shoulder with left hand, star left, B right, •SM•TS• in exergue; ex FORVM (2012); $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00
 


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Venus (Aphrodite) can be faulted for the Trojan War. Upset that she was not invited to a wedding, she went anyway and maliciously left a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses, as Aphrodite expected, argued who was the rightful possessor of this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RB32716. Billon follis, RIC VI Heraclea 43, SRCV IV 14593, gVF, weight 5.566 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, c. 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse GAL VALERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VENERI VICTRICI, Venus standing left, raising apple in right hand, raising drapery over shoulder with left hand, HTB in exergue; SOLD


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The coins of Galeria from the mint of Cyzikus were all struck in the 4th officina which is marked in the left field. In these years the mint issued three groups, the second being marked with a star in the right field and the third with three dots in the right field. But our coin has only one dot. A RIC footnote records a similary marked Licinius in the Oxford collection and states it is probably a mint error. The coin was made in the first officina which probably rules out a repeat error by a die cutter. More likely, the mint started its third group by marking with only one dot, then quickly switched to three dots, perhaps to make the coins more noticeable. Another treat for the specialist collector.
RB07643. Billon follis, RIC VI Cyzicus 71 variant, gVF, weight 7.27 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 311 A.D.; obverse GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VENERI V-ICTRICI, Venus standing left, raising apple in right hand, raising drapery over shoulder with left hand, D in left field, • in right field, MKV in exergue; from the Scott Collection; very rare; SOLD







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GALVALERIAAVG

REFERENCES

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Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R.A.C. & C.H.V. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, August 23, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Galeria Valeria