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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |North Africa| ▸ |Numidia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Numidia

Numidia was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.


Kingdom of Numidia, Juba II, 25 B.C. - 23 A.D.

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These coins are usually called denarii because their design is inspired by the Roman pieces, however their weight is one full gram lower.
RP22816. Silver drachm, Mazard 341, SGICV 5974, SNG Cop 593, near Mint State, weight 3.036 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 180o, obverse REX IVBA, diademed head right; reverse cornucopia and transverse scepter; sharply struck, toned with underlying luster, Ponterio & Associates, Inc., Sale #142, 1724; scarce; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

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When King Masinissa died, rule was divided among his three sons by Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, to whom Masinissa had given the authority to administer his estate. Micipsa received the Numidian capital of Cirta along with the palace and treasury, Gulussa the charge of war, and Mastarnable the administration of justice. After his brothers died, Micipsa alone controlled the kingdom.
GB56731. Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a, Mazard III 50, Müller Afrique 32, SNG Cop 505 ff., SGCV II 6597, VF, weight 15.022 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head (Micipsa?) left with pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse rearing left, pellet below; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Juba I, 60 - 46 B.C.

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Juba supported Pompey the Great in the civil war and committed suicide after Caesar's victory.
RR57730. Silver denarius, SNG Cop 523, Mazard 379; Alexandropoulos 29; Müller Afrique -, aVF, toned, weight 3.251 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 315o, Utica mint, 60 - 46 B.C.; obverse REX IVBA, diademed and draped bust right, hair in ringlets, scepter over right shoulder; reverse neo-Punic legend HMMLKT YWB'Y, octastyle temple, tall platform with narrow central steps, pellet between spaced central columns, tall architrave, small gable-roofed upper construction; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
When King Masinissa died, rule was divided among his three sons by Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus, to whom Masinissa had given the authority to administer his estate. Micipsa received the Numidian capital of Cirta along with the palace and treasury, Gulussa the charge of war, and Mastarnable the administration of justice. After his brothers died, Micipsa alone controlled the kingdom.
GB62514. Bronze AE 26, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a, Mazard III 50, Müller Afrique 32, SNG Cop 505 ff., SGCV II 6597, VF, weight 15.512 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head (Micipsa?) left with pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse rearing left, pellet below; countermark: horned and bearded head of Ammon left within incuse square; rare countermark; SOLD


Rusicade, Numidia, 1st Century B.C.

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Numidia was highly Romanized and was studded with numerous towns. Rusicada was the port for the capital city, Cirta.
GB39916. Bronze AE 29, Mazard 537, Laffaille 646, aF, weak reverse, weight 13.391 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 285o, Rusicade (Skikda, Algeria) mint, 1st century B.C.; obverse jugate busts of the Dioskouroi right; reverse two horses standing right, Punic 'ASG' above; very rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Numidia was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
SL84534. Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a; Mazard III 50; Müller Afrique III p. 18, 32; SNG Cop 505 ff.; SGCV II 6597, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (3854272-006), weight 16.02 g, maximum diameter 27 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head of king left, pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse galloping left, pellet below, linear border; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Juba I, 60 - 46 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Juba supported Pompey the Great in the civil war and committed suicide after Caesar's victory.
RR18521. Silver denarius, debased metal; SNG Cop 524, VF, rough, corrosion, weight 3.200 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Utica mint, 60 - 46 B.C.; obverse REX IVBA, diademed and draped bust right, hair in ringlets, hold scepter over shoulder; reverse neo-Punic legend [HMMLKT] YWB'Y, octastyle temple; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Numidia (202 - 46 B.C.) was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
GB77302. Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a, Mazard III 50, Müller Afrique 32, SNG Cop 505 ff., SGCV II 6597, F, near black dark glossy patina, earthen deposits, weight 14.970 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head of king left, pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse galloping left, pellet below, linear border; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Hiempsal II, 106 - 60 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Numidia (202 - 46 B.C.) was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
GS10098. Silver quinarius, SGCV II 6603, SNG Cop 379, VF+, areas struck flat, weight 2.100 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 106 - 60 B.C.; obverse beardless head of Hiempsal II right wreathed in grain; reverse horse galloping right, Punic letters (=ht) below; SOLD


Kingdom of Numidia, Juba II and Cleopatra Selene, 25 B.C. - 23 A.D.

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Cleopatra Selene was the daughter of Cleopatra VII by Marc Antony. After the battle of Actium, she was paraded in Octavian's triumph and then raised by Octavia. Augustus made Cleopatra Selene queen of Mauritania and married her to Juba, the king of Numidia. The crocodile symbolized Egypt, a land she had the hereditary right to rule, but which was not part of her kingdom.

These coins are usually called denarii because their design is inspired by the Roman pieces, however their weight is one full gram lower.
RP22815. Silver drachm, Mazard 343, SGICV 6004, SNG Cop 592, near Mint State, weight 2.8394 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, obverse REX IVBA, diademed head right; reverse KΛEOΠATPA BACIΛIC[...], Egyptian crocodile left; sharply struck, toned with underlying luster, obverse 1/5 off-center but full portrait and legend on flan, Ponterio & Associates, Inc., Sale #142, 1725; scarce; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Alexandropoulos, J. Les monnaies de l'Afrique antique: 400 av. J.-C. - 40 ap. J.-C. (Toulouse, 2000).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Falbe, C. & J. Lindberg. Numismatique de L'Ancienne Afrique. (Copenhagen, 1860-1862).
Mazard, J. Corpus Nummorum Numidiae Mauretaniaeque. (Paris, 1955-1958).
Müller, L. et. al. Numismatique de l'ancienne Afrique. (Copenhagen, 1860-1862).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Bàle, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
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Numidia