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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ SecurityView Options:  |  |  | 

Security (Securitas)

Securitas was depicted on Roman coins more frequently in perilous times. Securitas coin types may have been appeals to the gods, or expressions of hope or intent, or perhaps it simply propaganda.


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

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Securitas stands perfectly at her ease, with legs crossed and leaning on a column, clearly relaxed, having nothing to fear. Macrinus was praised for restoring security by eliminating the fratricidal son of Severus, long feared as the most cruel tyrant of Rome, beloved only by a venal soldiery, whom his largesses had enriched.
SH77277. Silver denarius, RIC IV 92b, BMCRE V 80, RSC III 122c corr. (Antioch), Hunter III 32 var. (draped, no cuirass), SRCV II 7365, Choice EF, nearly as struck, light tone on luster, superb portrait, well centered, small edge cracks, weight 3.140 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS TEMPORVM (time of security), Securitas standing facing, head left, scepter in right hand, left leg crossed in front of right, leaning with left forearm on column; $450.00 (382.50)


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

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The same types with the same legends may have been minted for Macrinus at both Rome and Antioch. Some examples with a short beard and younger face are clearly of the style of Rome (and probably look little like Macrinus who was in the east). Some, but probably not all, examples with a longer beard and older features were probably minted at Antioch. RIC does not attempt to distinguish between the products of the two mints.
RS73902. Silver denarius, RIC IV 24b; RSC III 62; BMCRE V p. 501, 40; Hunter III 19; SRCV II 7347, VF, well centered, very dark thick toning, perhaps debased silver, weight 2.495 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (or Rome?) mint, Jan 217 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate cuirassed bust right; reverse PONTIF MAX TR P COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power, consul, father of the country), Securitas standing facing, head left, legs crossed, long scepter vertical in right, resting left arm on column; $125.00 (106.25)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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In Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume III, David Sear notes this type was issued for the wedding of Gordian and Tranquillina.

Under Gordian III the same coin types were often struck at both Rome and Antioch. One way to distinguish Gordian's coins struck at Antioch from those struck at Rome is the shape of the letter M. On coins from Antioch, M usually resembles a V in the middle of two I's, thus IVI. From the Rome mint, M normally resembles two lambdas, thus ΛΛ.
RS79932. Silver denarius, RIC IV 130 (R), RSC IV 340, Hunter III 65, SRCV III 8682, Choice gVF, well centered, nice metal, die wear, weight 2.879 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, issued for wedding to Tranquillina, 241 - 242 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRITAS PVBLICA (security of the public), Securitas seated left, at ease, scepter in right hand, propping head with left hand; $110.00 (93.50)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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On 25 February 244, Gordian III was murdered by mutinous soldiers in Zaitha (Mesopotamia). Philip the Arab, who had been responsible for Gordian's "perpetual security," declared himself emperor.
RB73637. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 335a, Cohen V 329, Hunter III 152, SRCV III 8740, VF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck, attractive brown surfaces, light marks and corrosion, small edge cracks, weight 17.188 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 5th issue, c. 243 - Jul 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRITAS PERPET (everlasting security), Securitas standing facing, head left, right leg crossed in front of left leg, vertical scepter in right hand, leaning with left arm on column, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; $105.00 (89.25)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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In winter 241, Gordian III arrived at Antioch and began to prepare with his army for an offensive against the Persians. In 242, Shapur I made a preemptive attack on Antioch to drive him out. Gordian's father-in-law, Timesitheus, repeatedly defeated the Persians until, in 243, Shapur was forced to retreat back to Persia.
RS65189. Silver denarius, RIC IV 130 (R), RSC IV 340, Hunter III 65, SRCV III 8682, VF, well centered, weight 3.174 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 241 - 242 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SECVRITAS PVBLICA (security of the public), Securitas seated left, at ease, scepter in right hand, propping head with left hand; $75.00 (63.75)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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The RIC lists this type as common but this is only the third coin of Constans with this reverse type handled by Forum.
RL68789. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Rome 11, LRBC I 588, SRCV V 18566, Cohen VII 102, Voetter -, Hunter V -, VF, attractive green patina, weight 1.331 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 9 Sep 337 - spring 340 A.D.; obverse D N FL CONSTANS AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIP (security of the Republic), Securitas standing right holding scepter in right and leaning left elbow on column, R clover leaf Q in exergue; rare; $60.00 (51.00)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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RIC lists this type as scarce, however, we believe it is rare.
RL56550. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Rome 13 (S), LRBC I 588, Voetter 11, SRCV V 18566, Cohen VII 102, Hunter V -, aVF, green patina, some legend weak, weight 1.577 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Rome mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse D N FL CONSTANS AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIP (security of the Republic), Securitas standing facing, head right, long scepter in right, leaning with left elbow on column, R leaf T in exergue; rare; $45.00 (38.25)


Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RL77790. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Rome 24(b), LRBC II 725, SRCV V 19829, Cohen VIII 47, VF, well centered and struck on a tight flan, nice green patina, traces of flan casting sprues, weight 2.749 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, SM leaf RB in exergue; $35.00 (29.75)


Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

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They look similar, but there is a significant physical difference between angels and Victory. Angels are all male. Victory (Nike) is female. On Byzantine coinage, the male angel replaced the female Victory after the reunion with Rome was concluded on 28 March 519 A.D.
RL77791. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 14(b)xvi, LRBC II 1330, SRCV V 19835, Cohen VIII 47, VF, well centered, green patina, bumps and marks, edge split, weight 2.895 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, * / F left, M right, ASISC in exergue; $28.00 (23.80)







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Catalog current as of Saturday, November 18, 2017.
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