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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Laodicea ad Mare||View Options:  |  |  |   

Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia), Syria

The Laodicea mint, like that at Emesa, operated for Septimius Severus' family, from 195 to 202 A.D.


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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PAR AR AD abbreviates Parthicus Arabicus Adiabenicus; the Parthian, the Arabian, the Adiabenican titles given to Septimius Severus for having conquered those countries.
SH47733. Silver denarius, RSC III 360, BMCRE V 627, cf. RIC IV 496 corr. and 494B var. (obv. legend), SRCV II -, aEF, weight 2.013 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse L SEP SEVERVS PER AVG P M IMP XI, laureate head right; reverse PAR AR AD TR P VI COS II P P, trophy of captured arms, two bound captives at feet, wearing peaked Parthian caps; rare; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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Minerva, equated with the Greek Athena, was the Roman virgin warrior goddess of poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic, and the inventor of music. She was worshiped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno.
SH28445. Silver denarius, RIC IV 105(a); RSC III 83; BMCRE V p. 302, 751; Hunter III p. 77, 55; SRCV II 7181, Choice EF, weight 3.114 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, c. 202 - 203 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, bare headed, draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse MINERV SANCT (sacred Minerva), Minerva standing half left, resting right hand on shield, inverted spear in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. The city was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS90503. Silver denarius, RIC IV 511(a), RSC III 4 55a; BMCRE V p. 294, 712; SRCV II -, Choice aEF, bold full circles strike on a broad flan, weight 3.231 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 200 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse P MAX TR P VIII COS II P P, Fides standing half left, raising a basket of fruits in right, two stalks of grain in left; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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This type probably refers to Severus' departure for his eastern campaign. This PROFECTIO AVG type with the obverse legend ending TR P VIIII is listed in RIC as rare and is much scarcer than the same type with the legend ending TR P VIII.
RS74405. Silver denarius, RIC IV 494 (S); BMCRE V p. 116, 466; SRCV II 6353 (Laodicea); RSC III 580; Hunter III -, Choice aEF, excellent portrait, centering and surfaces, highest points flatly struck, very small open edge crack, weight 3.196 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 197 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIIII, laureate head right; reverse PROFECTIO AVG, Septimius on horse pacing right, transverse spear in right, reins in left; scarce; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. Laodicea was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS68071. Silver denarius, RIC IV 337d (S), RSC III 168e; BMCRE V p. 283, 641 var. (no cuirass); SRCV II 6822 var. (head), EF, nice boy portrait, weight 3.654 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 45o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR ANTON AVG P TR P, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MONETA AVGG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. The city was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
SH90491. Silver denarius, RIC IV 492; BMCRE V p. 116, 463; RSC III 433; cf. SRCV II 6331 (Rome mint), Choice aEF, weight 3.410 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea-ad-mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 197 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIIII, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P V COS II P P, Sol standing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Additional information from Curtis Clay: "The Mars type: R. Mowat, Revue Num. 1901, p. 469, no. 1, in his collection, with engraving. Apparently overlooked by Mattingly in RIC and BMC. Looks like yours might be from the same reverse die as his, but a different obverse die."
RS47757. Silver denarius, R. Mowat, Revue Num. 1901, p. 469, no. 1 (same reverse die, otherwise unpublished), BMCRE -, RIC -, RSC -, VF, toned, weight 2.311 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 A.D.; obverse L SEP SEVERVS PER AVG P M IMP XI, laureate head right; reverse PAR AR AD TR P VI COS II P P, Mars advancing right, nude except for helmet and cloak tied in belt at waist and flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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In 201, Osroene, a semi-autonomous vassal kingdom located in Mesopotamia, became the first state to adopt Christianity as its official religion. The independence of the state ended in 244 when it was incorporated in the Roman Empire.
RS58680. Silver denarius, RIC IV 342, RSC III 181, aEF, filled die, weight 2.881 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 201 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P MAX TR P III, Roma seated left on shield, Victory in right hand, scepter in left hand; nice Eastern style; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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In 200, Septimius Severus visited Syria, Palestine and Arabia. Palestine, benefiting from the benevolent policies of Severus, began a significant economic revival.
RS90475. Silver denarius, RIC IV 505, RSC III 251, BMCRE V 660, Choice aEF, weight 4.038 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 198 - 202 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse IVSTITIA, Justitia seated left on throne, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Minerva, equated with the Greek Athena, was the Roman virgin warrior goddess of poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic, and the inventor of music. She was worshiped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno.
RS47411. Silver denarius, RIC IV 105(a); RSC III 83; BMCRE V p. 302, 751; Hunter III p. 77, 55; SRCV II 7181, Choice gVF, weight 3.394 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, c. 202 - 203 A.D.; obverse P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES, bare headed, draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse MINERV SANCT (sacred Minerva), Minerva standing half left, resting right hand on shield, inverted spear in left hand; scarce; SOLD




  




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Laodicea ad Mare