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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Heros ▸ RomulusView Options:  |  |  |   

Romulus

Romulus and Remus are the mythical twin founders of Rome. Their grandfather was Numitor, king of Alba Longa, a descendant of the Trojan Prince Aeneas and father to their mother, Rhea Silvia. Numitor's brother Amulius deposed him, killed his sons and forced Rhea to become a Vestal Virgin, but Rhea conceived Romulus and Remus by Mars (or Hercules). Amulius exposed the newborns to die but a she-wolf found and suckled them. A shepherd and his wife raised them to manhood. The twins were natural leaders, and acquired many followers. When told their true identities, they killed Amulius, restored Numitor to the throne of Alba Longa and decided to found a new city for themselves. Romulus wished to build the new city on the Palatine Hill but Remus preferred the Aventine Hill. They agreed to determine the site through augury. Romulus received the more favorable signs but each claimed the results in his favor. Remus was killed in the dispute. Romulus named the new city Rome, after himself, and created the Roman Legions and the Roman Senate. Rome's population was swelled by landless refugees and outlaws, mostly men. They abducted women from the neighboring Sabine tribes, which led to war but eventually resulted the Sabines and Romans joining. In later life Romulus became increasingly autocratic, disappeared in mysterious circumstances and was deified as the god Quirinus, the divine persona of the Roman people. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe the mythological narrative is mostly or entirely fiction.


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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In 323, Constantine the Great defeated invading Goths and Sarmatians north of the Danube in Dacia, and claimed the title Sarmaticus Maximus.
RS85085. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 308 note, SRCV IV 16728, Cohen VII 21, Hunter V 13 (plain shield), gVF, very rare in white metal, scarce and desirable shield decoration, well centered and struck, some porosity and corrosion, light scratches, weight 3.274 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield on left shoulder ornamented with she-wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus; reverse BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; $170.00 (€144.50)
 


Lot of 2 VF Roma Commemoratives, Wolf and Twins Reverse, 333 - 334 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. Coins were issued with types for Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL84874. Billon reduced centenionalis, Pair of Rare Wolf and Twins; 1) Palm frond, RIC VII Trier 561 (ex CNG); 2) Wreath: RIC VII Arles 373, EF, minor flaws, 333 - 334 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, symbol between two stars above, mintmark in exergue; rare types; $155.00 (€131.75)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RP85227. Bronze AE 23, SNG BnF 1503, BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Çanakkale -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Hunt -, Weber -, aVF, nice portrait, well centered, light corrosion, weight 5.905 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPE SEV MACRINVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana), she-wolf standing right, head left, suckling the twin infants Romulus and Remus; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RP85261. Bronze AE 23, SNG BnF 1503, BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Çanakkale -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Hunt -, Weber -, aVF, excellent centering and strike, marks, light corrosion, weight 6.360 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPE SEV MACRINVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana), She-wolf standing right, head left, suckling the twin infants Romulus and Remus; rare; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RP84560. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 187; Bellinger Troy A442; BMC Troas p. 30, 167 var. (legends); SNG Hunterian 1296 var. (same); SNGvA -, gVF, excellent portrait, well centered and struck on a broad flan, porous, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.844 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 225o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP LIC V-ALERIAN, laureate, draped, and bearded bust right, from behind; reverse COL AV, TRO (TRO in exergue), she-wolf standing right, head turned facing, suckling Romulus and Remus; ex Agora Auction 52, lot 90; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia in the province of Asia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. When this coin was minted, Parium was within the Conventus of Adramyteum. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, Parium was in the province of Hellespontus. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP85224. Bronze AE 24, SNG Çanakkale 218, SNG Cop 295 var. (obv. leg. no AV); BMC Mysia p. 106, 107 var. (obv. leg. ends A); SNG BnF -; SNGvA -; SNG Tüb -; et al. -, VF, full circles strike, scratches, weight 8.503 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AV, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, beardless, from behind; reverse she-wolf standing right, head left, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, C G I H PAR (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) curving above, final R in exergue; rare; $100.00 (€85.00)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus were the twin sons of the Vestal Virgin Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war, Mars. They were abandoned in the Tiber as infants. Faustulus, a shepherd, found the infants being suckled by the she-wolf (Lupa) at the foot of the Palatine Hill. Their cradle, in which they had been abandoned, was on the shore overturned under a fig tree. Faustulus and his wife, Acca Larentia, raised the children. Romulus was the first King of Rome.
RP85259. Bronze AE 23, SNG BnF 1503 var. (no A on rev.), BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Çanakkale -, SNG Tüb -, SNG Hunt -, Weber -, aVF, well centered, some corrosion and light pitting, weight 6.787 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPE SEV MACRINVS, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse C G I H PA (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) curving above, final A in exergue, She-wolf standing right, head left, suckling the twin infants Romulus and Remus; very rare; $100.00 (€85.00)
 


City of Rome Commemorative, 332 - 333 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79233. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 542, LRBC I 65, SRCV IV 16488, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V 1 var. (1st officina), Choice EF, perfect centering, reverse strike slightly weak, light porosity, weight 2.704 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, TR•S in exergue; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


City of Rome Commemorative, 333 - 335 A.D.

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On 13 September 335, Constantine I consecrated the Church of the Holy sepulcher in Jerusalem.
RL85706. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Constantinople 85 (R3), LRBC I 1022, SRCV IV 16520, Cohen VII 17, Choice VF, highlighting red earthen fill, weight 2.401 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 333 - 335 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, •CONSE• in exergue; scarce; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


City of Rome Commemorative, 335 - 336 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL76421. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Rome 370 (R2), LRBC I 556, SRCV IV 16509, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, VF, tight, slightly ragged flan, weight 1.840 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 335 - 336 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, R * Q in exergue; first example of this rare type handled by Forum; rare; $80.00 (€68.00)
 




  



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Romulus