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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ BaalView Options:  |  |  | 

Baal

Ba'al simply means 'Lord' in Phoenician and was used to describe many local gods. At first the name Ba'al was used by the Jews for their God, but as the struggle between religions developed, the name Ba'al was given up in Judaism. Over time Ba'al became synonymous with Beelzebub.


Arados, Phoenicia, Uncertain King, c. 400 - 384 B.C.

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Early coins of Arados have the Aramaic letters mem aleph (read from right to left) above the galley, abbreviating Melech Arad (meaning King of Arados), sometimes followed by the king's initial, and sometimes by the Phoenician regnal year date.
GS87352. Silver stater, Elayi-Elayi Arwad group III.2.1; HGC 10, 32 (R1), VF, typical compact flan, bumps and marks, weight 10.308 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 270o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 400 - 384 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Ba'al Arwad right, with profile eye; reverse galley right, figure of Pataikos right on prow, row of shields on bulwark, Phoenician letters mem aleph (abbreviating Melech Arad - King of Arados) from right to left above, three waves below; ex CNG e-auction 424 (11 Jul 2018), lot 252; rare; $235.00 (Ä199.75)


Ziz (Panormos), Punic Sicily, c. 405 - 380 B.C.

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Some authorities have identified the male head on the obverse as Apollo. Indeed, on some examples the head does resemble other depictions of the youthful sun god, but on other examples the god is horned. On this coin the head seems to better resemble traditional depictions of Herakles or Baal. The type usually has the Punic ethnic above the bull. Sometimes it is below. Most likely it should be above on this coin but is merely unstruck.
GS79961. Silver obol, cf. Jenkins Punic (SNR 50) 14; BMC Sicily p. 249, 27; SNG ANS 551; SGCV I 889 (all w/ Punic ethnic "sys" above bull), aVF, toned, reverse slightly off center, weight 0.547 g, maximum diameter 9.1 mm, die axis 45o, Ziz (Palermo, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 405 - 380 B.C.; obverse male head left; reverse man-faced bull advancing left, head turned facing; $130.00 (Ä110.50)


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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This type is one of our favorites.
SH08014. Silver stater, SNG Levante 106; Casabonne 2C; SNG BnF 350 var. (TN vice NT), gEF, superb nearly mint state, extraordinary sharp and bold strike, slightly irregular flan, weight 10.84 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 45o, Tarsos mint, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (=Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, BLTRZ (Baaltars) in Aramaic (read upward) behind; bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand; lotus headed scepter vertical behind in left hand, Aramaic letters NT lower left and M below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above, Aramaic monogram below; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Sunday, September 23, 2018.
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Baal