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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |Medieval & Modern Rarities||View Options:  |  |  |   

Rare Medieval & Modern Coins

Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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This is the line drawing coin in Malloy, Preston and Seltman's Coins of the Crusader States.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, it was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

Historically of great importance, this coin was minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

CR31585. Bronze AE 15, Malloy Crusaders 132 (this coin), VF, weight 0.986 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 225o, obverse A/N-T/I clockwise in the angles of a long cross pattée; reverse ANTI counterclockwise in the angles of a long cross pattée; extremely rare; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Old tag notes, "The Hague, Holland Viken Havandjian, Jan. 22, 1976, $65.00"

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, it was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type (one a variant without the T) from the Malloy Collection. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32267. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and historically important, the finest of three known to exist, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, aVF, octagonal shaped flan, weight 0.646 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, obverse hexagram, ANT (Antioch) monogram in center (T is small and above H); reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Louis of Burgundy, 31 Jul 1313 - 2 Aug 1316

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Louis of Burgundy was a younger son of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy and Agnes of France. On 31 Jul 1313, he married Matilda of Hainaut to whom Philip I of Taranto gave the Principality of Achaea. Louis ceded his family lands in Burgundy to his elder brother in exchange for the title of "King of Thessalonica." Matilda and Louis arrived separately in Achaea, she sailing directly from Marseille to Navarino with 1,000 troops. Matilda's army was defeated on 22 Feb 1316 by Ferdinand of Majorca, who also claimed the principality. Louis came by way of Venice to solicit aid from the Republic. He defeated Ferdinand, who was killed in the battle, on 5 July 1316. Four weeks later, Louis died. The Chronicle of the Morea attributes his death to a fever, while the Catalan Declaratio summa states that he was poisoned by John, count of Cephalonia. His death left Achaea in an unsettled state, with his brother Eudes, his wife, and the Angevins all attempting to gain it.Arms_of_Achaea
ME71110. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 29, Metcalf Crusades 993 - 996, Schlumberger XII 23, aVF, coppery spots, weight 0.599 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 135o, Clarentza mint, 1313 - 1316; obverse + LODOVIC•D•B•P•AChE, cross pattée; reverse DE CLARENCIA annulet before and after legend, castle tournois, annulet left; very rare; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of about 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Afterward, lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding the letter with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type (one a variant without the T) from the Malloy Collection. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32083. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and important, one of three known, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, VF, weight 0.672 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 270o, obverse hexagram, ANT (Antioch) monogram in center (T is small and above H); reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Late Anonymous, 1250 - 1268

Click for a larger photo
From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. See Malloy Crusaders p. 197 for a discussion of the late anonymous series.

Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.

Antioch existed for over 1500 years, was one of the three most important cities in the ancient world, and in the 1st century had a population of about 500,000 (not counting women and slaves). On 18 May 1268, Antioch surrendered to Baibars on the condition that the lives of the citizens would be spared. As soon as his troops were within the gates, Baibars ordered the gates shut and brutally massacred everyone in the city. Lamenting that Antioch's ruler had not been present either for the siege or the ransacking and murder, Baibars wrote a detailed letter describing exactly what had been done, concluding with the phrase, "Had you been there, you would have wished you had never been born."

FORVM has three examples of this type from the Malloy Collection. This particular coin is a unique variant. The other two examples have a small T above H, missing on this coin. No other examples are known and the type is otherwise unknown to modern numismatics. Historically of great importance, these coins were minted in the last throngs of the city of Antioch as it was dying.

SH32084. Bronze pougeoise, unpublished and historically important, unique variant of type with only three known, Malloy Crusaders -, Metcalf Crusades -, aVF, weight 0.774 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 45o, obverse hexagram, AN (Antioch) monogram in center; reverse hexagram, ΠP monogram in center (uncertain meaning, perhaps the moneyers name or the ruling Crusaders at this time but interestingly in Greek not Latin); of great rarity; SOLD


Crusaders, Principality of Antioch, Bohemond III, 1163 - 1201

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This is the line drawing coin in Malloy, Preston and Seltman's Coins of the Crusader States.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years. Ex Spink and Son. Ex R. Pesant Collection.
SH31535. Bronze pougeoise, Malloy Crusaders 71a (this coin), VF, edge chip, weight 0.729 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Majority, early period, 1163 - 1188; obverse + BOAMVNDVS, fleur-de-lis with splayed foot, pellet in each angle; reverse + ANTIOCHIA, cross pattée, five pointed star in each angle, fine beaded border; rare, Very Fine examples of this type are extremely difficult to obtain; SOLD


Crusaders, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, Roupen I, 1080 - 1095 A.D.

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Roupen I declared Cilicia independent from the Byzantine Empire in 1080, founding the Roupenian dynasty, which ruled Cilician Armenia until 1219. He led bold and successful military campaigns against the Byzantines, including capturing the fortress of Pardzerpert (today Andirin in Turkey), which became a stronghold of the new kingdom.
SH65204. Bronze Pogh, Bedoukian CCA 1, Nercessian 245, VF, weight 2.476 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, obverse Armenian legend: Raiben. (Roupen), cross within circle, pellets in quarters; reverse Armenian legend: Tsara ay (Servant of God), cross within circle, pellets in quarters; rare; SOLD


England, Edward I Longshanks, 1272 - 1307

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Elias notes, "In my experience for every 30 or 40 deniers with the EDWARD' FILI' legend only one with the EDWARDVS REX occurs."

Known as Edward Longshanks for his height of 6 ft. 2 in., and sometimes as the "Hammer of the Scots." Edward was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. He conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeding in doing the same to Scotland.
UK86321. Silver denier au lion, Elias 15 (RR), SCBC-SII 8016, Duplessy 1039, Poey d'Avant 2790, aVF, toned, scratches, earthen deposits, small edge crack, weight 0.736 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Aquitaine mint, 1272 - 1307; obverse + EDWARDVS REX (King Edward, S on its side), lion passant left within inner circle; reverse + DVX AqVITANIE (Duke of Aquitaine), cross pattée within inner circle; very rare; SOLD


Normans, Kingdom of Sicily, Roger II, 1105 - 1154 A.D.

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Roger II was King of Sicily, son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon. He began his rule as Count of Sicily in 1105, became Duke of Apulia and Calabria in 1127, and then King of Sicily in 1130. Roger II is remembered for having united all of the Norman conquests in Italy under one strong central government. He was also the grandfather of Frederick II.
ME66989. Bronze follaro, MIR 10 135 (R2), MEC Italy III 227, VF, weight 1.634 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 45o, Messina mint, 1150 - 1151 A.D.; obverse MP − ΘY (Greek abbreviation: Mother of God), half-length bust of the Virgin Orans facing; reverse Arabic inscription arranged as a cross: umila five hundred forty five (struck in 545), four dots arranged in a square in each corner; very rare; SOLD


France, Provincial, Duchy of Normandie, William the Conqueror, 1035 - 1087, In the Name of William Rufus(?)

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There are two varieties of this denier, one with RICAR above the pediment (Legros 336) and the other with two W's (Legros 337, Dumas and Legros list only one specimen, in the Brussels Coin Cabinet). These two types were struck in the reign of William the Conqueror, after 1070. The RICAR issue may have been struck in the name of his son Richard (1057- c. 1081), Duke of Bernay; and the W's may refer to his son William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English.
ME79660. Silver denier, Dumas pl. XX, 12 (Brussels Coin Cabinet); Legros 337 (same, unique); Poey d'Avant –; Duplessy Féodales –; Roberts –; De Wit Collection –, VF, toned, weight 0.801 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rouen mint, c. 1070 - 1081; obverse + NORMANNA, cross pattée, pellets in each quarter, within linear inner border; reverse stylized cathedral facade, cross within arched doorway, two pellets above arch, two towers flanking (each a line topped with an annulet), pellet in triangular pediment, two W's (for William Rufus?) above the pediment; extremely rare; SOLD




  




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Medieval & Modern Rarities