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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Aphrodite or Venus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Aphrodite or Venus

Goddess of love, beauty and sexuality. Daughter of Zeus and Dione or, in other traditions, of Uranus. Symbols include the dove.


Ionia, Phokaia, c. 360 - 300 B.C.

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GS89699. Silver tetartemorion, apparently unpublished, four specimens known from auctions, including CNG e-auction 378 (13 Jul 2016), lot 160, VF, well centered, toned, slightly grainy, weight 0.280 g, maximum diameter 7.4 mm, die axis 270o, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, c. 360 - 300 B.C.; obverse female (Aphrodite?) head left, hair rolled at back; reverse head and neck of a griffin left, with spiked crest, within a linear square border; ex Beast Coins; extremely rare; $250.00 SALE |PRICE| $225.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response, he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch, and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9. The Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power during his reign.
GP85912. Bronze trihemiobol, Lorber CPE B447; Svoronos 1005; SNG Cop 644; Weiser 107; BMC Ptolemies p. 52, 57; SNG Milan 199; Weber 854; McClean 9789; Noeske -; Hosking -, VF, dark patina, well centered, some red earthen deposits, porosity/light corrosion, central cavities, weight 17.135 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, series 5; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), cult statue of Aphrodite standing facing on base, wearing polos, chiton and peplos, right arm across breast, left arm downward away from side; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


The Sileraioi, Sicily, c. 357 - 330 B.C.

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Sileraioi was not a city. The Sileraians were Campanian mercenaries who took their name from their proximity to the river Silaros. These rare coins have been found at the site of their settlement, Cozzo Mususino, a natural strong-hold in north central Sicily. The coins are often overstruck on coins from Syracuse minted c. 375 - 345 B.C.
SH68704. Bronze Calciati p. 301, 2; HGC 2 1243 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG MŁnchen -; SNG Morcom -, VF/F, reverse rough, weight 7.521 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 90o, Sileraian mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse ΣI−ΛEPAIΩ−N (retrograde counterclockwise from 3:00), man-faced bull forepart charging right; reverse SIL (retrograde, upward behind), warrior advancing right, spear in right hand, shield in left; rare; $170.00 SALE |PRICE| $153.00


Livia and Julia, Pergamon, Mysia, c. 10 - 2 B.C.

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Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia. Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius. During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
RP89139. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2359; SNG Cop 467; BMC Mysia p. 139, 248; AMC I 1229; McClean 7718; SNG Paris -; SNGvA -, aVF, closed flan crack, earthen encrustation, weight 4.195 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, grammateus Charinos, c. 10 - 3 B.C.; obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia (as Hera) right; reverse IOVΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia (as Aphrodite) right; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Roman Republic, Gaius Norbanus, 83 B.C.

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In 83 B.C., Sulla returned from Greece and defeated the popular forces led by the consul Norbanus (probably the father of this moneyer). The reverse type alludes to the elder Norbanus' activity during the Social War, when he raised troops, organized a fleet, and provisioned the town of Rhegium.

Fasces, from the Latin fascis meaning "bundle," is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe with its blade emerging. The fasces originated with the Etruscans and was passed on to ancient Rome, where it symbolized a magistrate's power and jurisdiction. The image has survived in the modern world as a representation of magisterial or collective power, law and governance. The fasces frequently occurs as a charge in heraldry. It was the origin of the name of the Mussolini's National Fascist Party in Italy (from which the term fascism is derived). It is on the reverse of the U.S. Mercury dime and behind the podium in the United States House of Representatives.
RR88001. Silver denarius, RSC I Norbana 2, Sydenham 739, Crawford 357/1b, BMCRR I Rome 2810, SRCV I 278, aF, light toning, scratches, banker's mark, weight 3.458 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 83 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Venus right, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace, Roman numeral control number behind, CēNORBANVS below; reverse fasces between grain ear on left and caduceus on right; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Laodicea ad Lycus, Phrygia, c. 200 - 133 B.C.

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Laodicea on the Lycus was on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana, now near the modern city of Denizli, Turkey. It was home to one of the Seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelation. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. Its ruins attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled. Laodicea
GB91507. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phrygia p. 284, 29; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Lindgren -, aVF, dark patina rubbed to bare bronze on highest points, reverse slightly off center, weight 3.437 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycum (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane, hair in a bun at the back; reverse Aphrodite standing slightly left, head left, draped in long chiton dove in extended right hand, rose on stem in lower left field, ΛAO∆IKEΩN downward on right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $95.00 SALE |PRICE| $85.50


Paphos, Cyprus, Timocharis or Nicolcles, c. 350 - 320 B.C.

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Destrooper-Georgiades speculates, that the type of the rose may mark a change of reign in the royal house of Paphos or a monetary reform. She also notes, they are often corroded and their study presents many difficulties of classification and dating because, like most bronzes struck in Cyprus at that time they are anepigraphic or bear only one syllabic character whose meaning is not always obvious and because none was found in a dated stratigraphic layer, not even the 12 or so found in the systematic excavations of Kourion and of Paphos.
GB88980. Bronze AE 14, cf. Zapiti-Michaelidou 22; Destrooper-Georgiades Nouvelles 13; Tzambazis 92; BMC Cyprus p. 45; 49, gF, crowded flan, corrosion, weight 2.193 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 180o, Paphos mint, c. 350 - 320 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite left, wearing ornamented stephanos; reverse rose, tendril left; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 282 B.C.

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In Coins of the Ptolemaic Empire, C. Lorber writes, "This series combines a type of local significance -- Aphrodite, patroness of Cyprus -- with Ptolemy's personal badge, the eagle on thunderbolt, and names Ptolemy as issuing authority." Of the likely mint, Lorber writes, "The pattern of finds for this issue is consistent with an origin at Palai Paphos, home to the great sanctuary of Aphrodite Cypria."
GP85879. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B120; Svoronos 81 (2 spec.); BMC Ptolemies p. 7, 60; SNG Milan 28; SNG Cop 643; Weiser 3; Noeske -; Malter -, F, tight flan, rough corrosion, weight 3.046 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Palai Paphos(?) mint, 294 - 282 B.C.; obverse head of Aphrodite Paphia right, wearing plain taenia; reverse eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, ΠTOΛE (upward on left); rare; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Katane, Sicily, c. 212 - 50 B.C.

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In 212 B.C., after a two-year siege, despite defenses designed by the Greek mathematician and scientist Archimedes, the Roman general Marcus Claudius Marcellus forced his way into Syracuse. Although Marcellus wished to spare the Syracusans, he was unable to stop his soldiers from sacking the city. Archimedes was killed. Marcellus carried off the art treasures of Syracuse to Rome, the first recorded instance of a practice which was to become common.
GB82650. Bronze two chalkoi, Calciati III p. 110, 25; SNG ANS 1278; SNG Morcom 563; HGC 2 612 (R1); BMC Sicily p. 51, 65 corr.; SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina, scratches, porous, weight 3.768 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Katane (Catania, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 212 - 50 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse KATA/NAIΩN, Aphrodite Hyblaia (or Isis?) standing right, wearing kalathos on head, holding dove in extended right, II (2 chalkoi) right; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

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Felix (Lucky) was a traditional epithet for Venus. Venus Felix was her cult title at Hadrian's temple to Venus Felix and Roma Aeterna on the Via Sacra. In dice-games, a popular pastime among Romans of all classes, the luckiest, best possible roll was known as "Venus."
RS91458. Silver antoninianus, GŲbl MIR 898c, RIC V-1 J7 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 115 (Lugdunum), Hunter IV J24, Eauze 1513, Cunetio 733 (20 spec.), Elmer 60, SRCV III 10655, VF, well centered, old cabinet toning, flow lines, struck with worn dies, weight 3.934 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head, crescent behind shoulders; reverse VENVS FELIX (Venus who brings good fortune), Venus seated left, extending right hand reaching for child (or Cupid) standing at her feet with arms raised to her, transverse scepter in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $40.00 SALE |PRICE| $36.00




  



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Aphrodite or Venus