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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Geography ▸ EgyptView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of Ancient Egypt

Please see the Egyptian, Beaded Horus Falcon and Kebhsenuf Funerary Ornaments, Ptolemaic Period, 304 - 30 B.C.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

These beaded Horus Falcon and Qebehsenuef funerary ornaments were likely placed on the chest of a mummy sheathed in strands of blue faience beads.
AZ33396. Colorful beaded funerary ornament; Alex G. Malloy, Ancient Art and Antiquities, Summer 1977, 17, intact with original strings, Superb, 7 " Horus Falcon with crowned head and spread wings, with pairs of 3 " Qebehsenuef, brightly colored turquoise blue, maroon, white yellow, and black beads faience beads; $1600.00 (1360.00)

Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Otho ruled for just a few months. The mint of Alexandria struck coins with his name, though the portrait bears little resemblance to those of the other mints. It is possible that Alexandria produced coins without having an image of the new emperor.
RP84745. Bronze hemidrachm, RPC I 5364 (3 spec.); Geissen 257; Dattari 336; BMC Alexandria 217; Milne 376; SNG BnF 710; Kampmann-Ganschow 18.13; Emmett 189 (R4); SNG Milan -, F, attractive brown tone, flan crack, light scratches, smoothing, weight 16.768 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, beveled edge; reverse bust of Nilus right, wearing papyrus diadem, cornucopia behind right shoulder, date LA (year 1) before; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; extremely rare; $1170.00 (994.50)

Mesopotamia, Levant, Arabia, or Egypt, Imitative Old Style Tetradrachm, c. 450 - 350 B.C.

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From Mesopotamia, across the Levante and Arabia, to Egypt, Persian satraps and local rulers struck imitative Athenian type tetradrachms. Some were struck with styles much different from the Athenian originals. Some included monograms or inscriptions in Aramaic or other local scripts. The style of this coin is close to the original Athenian but unusual enough that we are convinced it is an imitative. In particular, Athena's face is distorted and the owls eyes are unusually large.
GS86605. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Dewing 1622; SNG Cop 40; Svoronos Athens pl. 17, 18; SNG Munchen 56; HGC 4 1597; SGCV I 2526, gVF, centered on a tight flan, bumps and marks, punch on obverse, banker's mark on reverse, tiny edge cracks, weight 17.243 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 225o, unofficial mint, c. 450 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves into ear; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; $750.00 (637.50) ON RESERVE

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Huge 89.242g, 46.6mm bronze! The largest of all Ptolemaic bronze coin types.
GP87132. Bronze octobol, Svoronos 446; Weiser 19; BMC Ptolemies p. 37, 158; SNG Cop 142; Noeske 64; Hosking 13; Malter 67, VF, weakly struck areas, central dimples, some light bumps and scratches, weight 89.242 g, maximum diameter 46.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 285 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head turned back right, E between legs; ex World Numismatics (Carefree, AZ), ex Harlan J. Berk; scarce; $450.00 (382.50)

Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 130 - 153 A.D.

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Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
RX90575. Lead tessera, Dattari 6536, Geissen 3559 var. (11.23g), Emmett 4397 (R4), F, weight 4.666 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis (or Alexandria?) mint, c. 130 - 153 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing hem-hem crown of Harpocrates, crescent before; reverse Serapis standing left, wearing chiton, himation, and kalathos on head, right hand raised, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare; $200.00 (170.00)

Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
SH66838. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 5342; Geissen 2982; Kampmann-Ganschow 91.47; SRCV III 10716; BMC Alexandria p. 2266; Milne 4140, Choice aEF, weight 11.345 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 315o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 266 - 28 Aug 267 A.D.; obverse KOPNHΛIA CAΛWNEINA CEB, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in horizontal ridges and in plait looped below ear; reverse Tyche reclining left on couch, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, LI∆ (year 14) above; $180.00 (153.00)

Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 62 A.D., Lucan wrote a history of the conflict between Julius Caesar and Pompey.
RX86146. Bronze obol, RPC I 5263; Dattari 278/279; Geissen 149; BMC Alexandria 179/180; Milne 207; Kampmann-Ganschow 14.67, F, old scratch on obverse, reverse rough, edge cracks, weight 5.661 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 61 - 62 A.D.; obverse NER KLAY KAI CEB GEP, laureate head right; reverse AYTO KPAT, Roma standing half left, patera in right hand, shield and spear in left hand, LH (year 8) lower left; rare; $180.00 (153.00)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Magas in Kyrene, c. 277 - 249 B.C.

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Magas was the stepson of Ptolemy I, the son of Berenice I, and half-brother to Ptolemy II. In 276 B.C., he crowned himself King in Kyrene, married the daughter of Antiochos I and invaded Egypt with his Seleukid allies. The Seleukid army was defeated by Ptolemy II and Magas faced an internal revolt of Libyan nomads. Still, Kyrene remained independent as long as he lived.
GB65215. Bronze obol, Svoronos 324; Noeske 112; SNG Cop 431; SNG Milan 443; Malter 54; BMC Ptolemies p. 76, 14; Weiser -, VF, weight 7.158 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene (near Shahhat, Libya) mint, c. 277 - 261 B.C.; obverse diademed bust of Ptolemy right; reverse ΠTOΛEM BAΣIΛ MAΓ, horizontal winged thunderbolt, monogram above; rare; $160.00 (136.00)

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IX Soter II (Lathyros), 2nd Reign, 88 - 80 B.C.

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Ptolemy IX Lathyros was king of Egypt three times with intervening periods ruled by his brother, Ptolemy X Alexander. His first reign ended when his mother and co-regent Cleopatra III claimed that he tried to kill her and replaced him with Alexander, her favorite son. Ptolemy IX, replaced the gold sarcophagus of Alexander the Great with a glass one and melted the original to strike gold coinage. The citizens of Alexandria were outraged and he was killed soon after.
GP84839. Bronze AE 34, Svoronos 1696 (only 1 specimen), SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, Weiser -, Hosking -, Noeske -, Malter -, Cox Curium -, F, dark green patina, porous, reverse a little off center, irregular flan with pre-strike casting sprues, weight 16.863 g, maximum diameter 33.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cypriot mint, c. 87 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, petasos with diadem and straps (control symbol) left; extremely rare; $160.00 (136.00)

Ptolemaic Kingdom; Ptolemy IX, 2nd reign, 88 - 80 B.C.; or Ptolemy XII, 1st reign, 80 - 58 B.C.

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The Paphos II finds were excavated at the House of Dionysos in Paphos.
GP84889. Bronze hemiobol, Paphos II 383 - 385, otherwise unpublished, gVF, weight 1.996 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Paphos mint, 88 - 58 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned bust of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, single cornucopia bound with fillet; rare; $160.00 (136.00)



Catalog current as of Friday, March 23, 2018.
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