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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Lycaonia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Lycaonia

Lycaonia was a large region in the interior of Anatolia, north of Mount Taurus, bounded on the east by Cappadocia, on the north by Galatia, on the west by Phrygia and Pisidia, and on the south by Cilicia and in the Byzantine period Isauria; but its boundaries varied greatly at different times. The Lycaonians appear to have been in early times to a great extent independent of the Persian empire, and were like their neighbors the Isaurians a wild and lawless race of freebooters; but their country was traversed by one of the great natural lines of high road through Asia Minor, from Sardis and Ephesus to the Cilician gates, and a few considerable towns grew up along or near this line. After the defeat of Antiochus the Great, Lycaonia was given by the Romans to King Eumenes II of Pergamon. About 160 BC, part of Lycaonia was added to Galatia; and in 129 BC the eastern half was given to Cappadocia. Its administration and grouping changed often under the Romans. In Acts 14:6 Paul, after leaving Iconium, crossed the frontier and came to Lystra in Lycaonia. The mention of the Lycaonian language in the Acts of the Apostles (14:11) shows that the native language was spoken by the common people at Lystra even in 50 A.D.; and probably it was only later and under Christian influence that Greek took its place. In 371, Lycaonia was first formed into a separate Roman province. The ancient coinage of Lycaonia is quite limited. Judging from the number of types and known issues, coins appear to have been struck sporadically and perhaps mostly for prestige or important occasions.


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Laodicea Combusta, Lycaonia

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Nike is often found on coins minted by the Greeks. She is shown with wings, and is often in the action of flying. She is frequently shown crowning the victor of a battle, a victorious team of horses or charioteer (Sicily), and also crowning a king's name. Usually a wreath is held in her hand, with which she crowns the victorious subject. Sometimes she is shown alongside, erecting, or inscribing upon a trophy. She is nearly always shown with wings; a noteable exception is Athens, where they have a wingless Nike, in hopes she would not leave that city.
RP91181. Bronze AE 25, RPC II 1612 (7 spec.), vA Lykien 141, SNG BnF 2320, SNGvA 5399, Lindgren-Kovacs 1384, VF, dark green patina, bumps and marks, reverse a little off center, weight 9.779 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea Combusta (Ladik, Konya Province, Turkey) mint, 71 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPATWP KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC, laureate head right; reverse CEBACTH NEIKH KΛAY∆IOΛAO∆IKEWN, Nike standing slightly left, head left, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; very scarce; $220.00 (€193.60)
 


Laranda, Lycaonia, 4th Century B.C.

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Göktürk identifies this type as issued by Laranda, Lycaonia, which issued coins with the same types. Most references attribute the type to an uncertain city in Cilicia and some to Tarsos. Laranda was destroyed by Perdiccas in about 322 B.C. and later became a seat of Isaurian pirates. This type was minted with a progression of reverses, first with an incuse square, then a square border of dots, and finally with a circle of dots. The original archaic punch reverse gradually evolved into a regular die, nearly identical to an obverse die. This variant was struck near the end of that evolution, perhaps for the defense against Perdiccas.
GA92015. Silver obol, cf. Göktürk 82-5, pl XXV, 6-9; SNG BnF 450 (uncertain Cilicia); SNG Levante 225 (uncertain Cilicia), VF, well centered on a tight flan, struck with worn dies, corrosion, weight 0.584 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 125o, Laranda (Karaman, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse Baal seated left, stalk of grain and bunch of grapes in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse wolf forepart right, crescent above with horns upward, circle border of dots; ex Moneta (St. Cloud, MN); $70.00 (€61.60)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Claudiconium (Iconium), Lycaonia

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After Alexander's empire broke up, Iconium was ruled by Seleucus I Nicator and later the kings of Pergamon. Attalus III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed his kingdom to the Roman Republic. Under Claudius, the name was changed to Claudioconium, and under Hadrian to Colonia Aelia Hadriana. Paul and Barnabas preached in Iconium during their 1st Missionary Journey, c. 47 - 48 A.D., and Paul and Silas probably visited it again during Paul's 2nd Missionary Journey, c. 50 A.D. After non-believers in Iconium attempted to stone him, Paul fled to Lystra and Derbe. This is also mentioned in the Second Letter to Timothy.
RP86549. Bronze AE 27, vA Lykaoniens 270; SNGvA 8647; BMC Lycaonia p. 4, 3; RPC I 3544; SNG Paris 2282; SNG Cop 4; SNG Fitzwilliam 5211, VF, toned, reverse slightly off center, light marks and scratches, weight 10.068 g, maximum diameter 26.9 mm, die axis 0o, Iconium (Konya, Turkey) mint, 62 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPWN KAICAP CEBACTOC (counterclockwise from lower right), laureate head right; reverse ΠOΠΠAIA CEBACTH KΛAY∆EIKO,NIEWN (counterclockwise from lower right, ending in exergue), Poppaea (as Kore) seated left on low throne, poppy in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins, ex CNG e-auction 110 (16 Mar 2005), lot 119; scarce; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des médailles. (Paris, 1898).
Göktürk, M.T. "Small coins from Cilicia and surroundings" in MIMAA.
Hill, G.F. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Lycaonia, Isauria, and Cilicia. (London, 1900).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia, Galatia, Lykaonia, and Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, etc. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland I, Levante-Cilicia. (Zurich,1986).
Troxell, H. A. & J. H. Kagin. ?Cilicians and Neighbors in Miniature? in Kraay-Mĝrkholm Essays.
von Aulock, H., ed. Münzen und Städte Lycaoniens. (Tübingen, 1976).

Catalog current as of Saturday, September 21, 2019.
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Lycaonia