Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 2 MARCH Layaway and reserve are not available during the sale. Shop now and save! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING UNTIL 2 MARCH Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Shop now and save!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ GalatiaView Options:  |  |  | 

Galatia

Galatia was named for Gauls from Thrace who settled there and became its ruling caste following the Gallic invasion of the Balkans in 279 B.C. The local Cappadocian population was left in control of the towns and most of the land, paying tithes to the new military aristocracy who kept aloof in fortified farmsteads, surrounded by their bands. These Celtic warriors were often hired as mercenary soldiers, sometimes fighting on both sides in the great battles of the times. For decades their war bands ravaged western Asia Minor. About 232 B.C. the Hellenized cities united under king Attalus I of Pergamum, defeated them, and forced them to confine themselves to Galatia. The Galatians were defeated by Rome in 189 B.C. and became a client state of Rome in 64 B.C. During his second missionary journey, St. Paul of Tarsus visited Galatia, where he was detained by sickness (Galatians 4:13). The Galatians were still speaking their language (Gaulish) in the 4th century A.D. Galatia


Anatolia, Unknown King, 2nd Century B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
RPC I, p. 536, notes that this crab type, struck in three denominations is traditionally attributed to Amyntas, King of Galatia, 39 - 25 B.C., but omits the coins from the catalog because, "It is hard to see that this is really a version of the king's name." RPC then discusses other possible attributions and dismisses them all. We agree Amyntas is surely wrong.
SH65879. Bronze AE 16, SNG Fitzwilliam 5381; Imhoof-Blumer ZfN (1874) p. 332, 13; RPC I - (note, p. 536), VF, weight 3.985 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, obverse crab; reverse BA ME/MTOY / M (sic), inscription in three lines, no type; very rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00
 


Nero and Poppaea, 62 - 65 A.D., Koinon Galatia, Galatia

Click for a larger photo
Poppaea was renowned for her beauty and voluptuous extravagance. Nero divorced his first wife Octavia to marry her in 62 A.D. Three years later, in a fit of anger, Nero kicked her in the abdomen. Pregnant, she died from her injuries.
RP79843. Bronze AE 27, RPC I 3562, SNG BnF 2400, SNGvA 6117, SGICV 662, gF, nice portraits, legends not full struck, flan adjustment marks on the reverse, small flan crack, weight 13.988 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tavium(?) mint, 62 - 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩNOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate head of Nero right; reverse ΠOΠΠIAΣ ΣEBAΣTHΣ, draped bust of Poppaea right; SOLD


Plotina, Wife of Trajan, Augusta 105 - 129 A.D., Ankyra, Galatia

Click for a larger photo
Ankara, formerly Ancyra and Angora, is the capital of Turkey and its second largest city, with a population of 4,587,558 (2014). Ankara is a very old city with Hittite, Phrygian, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman archaeological sites. The historical center is a rocky hill rising 150 m (500 ft) over the left bank of the Ankara Cayi, a tributary of the Sakarya River, the classical Sangarius. The hill remains crowned by the ruins of the old citadel. There are well-preserved examples of Roman and Ottoman architecture throughout the city, the most remarkable being the 20 B.C. Temple of Augustus and Rome that boasts the Monumentum Ancyranum, an inscription recording the Res Gestae Divi Augusti.
RP74372. Bronze AE 20, SNGvA 3431, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Tübingen -, SNG Leypold -, BMC Galatia -, aF, edge crack, rough, weight 3.838 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ancyra (Ankara, Turkey) mint, 112 - Aug 117 A.D.; obverse ΠΛΩTEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse ANKYPANΩN, cult statue of Artemis Ephasia standing facing, veiled, arms extended with supports, flanked by two stags; very rare; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Arslan, M. "The Roman Coinage of Ancyra in Galatia" in Nomismata 1 (1997).
Arslan, M. The Coins of Galatian Kingdom and the Roman Coinage of Ancyra in Galatia. (Ankara, 2004).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. E. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines, Vol. IV. (Paris, 1809).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, [etc.]. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothéque Nationale, Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit. Vol. II: Phrygia - Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 28, 2017.
Page created in 0.967 seconds
Galatia Coins