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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Trojan WarView Options:  |  |  | 

The Trojan War on Ancient Coin

Homolion, Magnesia, Thessaly, Greece, Mid 4th Century B.C.

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Homolion was at the foot of Mount Homole but its exact location is still unknown. On the way to Troy, Philoktetes, the king of Homolion and the surrounding area, was bitten by a snake. The stench of his festering wound was so bad that Odysseus and his other companions stranded him on the island of Lemnos. Later they learned from prophesy that they could not take Troy without the bow and arrows of Herakles, which Philoktetes possessed. Odysseus and a group of men rushed back to Lemnos to recover Heracles' weapons. Surprised to find the him alive, the Greeks balked on what to do next. Odysseus tricked the weaponry away from Philoktetes, but Diomedes refused to take the weapons without the man. Herakles came down from Olympus and told Philoktetes to go, that he would be healed and win great honor as a hero. Outside Troy one of sons Asclepius healed his wound. Philoktetes was among those chosen to hide inside the Trojan Horse, and during the sack of the city he killed many famed Trojans.
GB85920. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 91 (same dies), Rogers 259, SNG Cop 73 var. (T behind head on obv.), HGC 4 87 (S), BCD Thessaly I -, BMC Thessaly -, VF, well centered and struck, dark patina, marks, corrosion, weight 10.111 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 270o, Homolion (near Omolio, Larissa, Greece) mint, mid 4th century B.C.; obverse head of Philoktetes left, bearded, wearing pilos; reverse OMOΛ-IEΩN (clockwise starting at 9:00), coiled serpent, erect head right, behind his head a small bunch of grapes; ex BCD Collection with his tag; ex Munzhandlung Ritter list 65 (Mar 2004), lot 614 (€140); very rare this nice; $140.00 (Ä119.00)


Roman Republic, C. Sulpicius C. f. Galba, 106 B.C.

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Crawford interprets this type as Aeneas landing in Lanuvium (home of Sulpicia gens) with the Penates and the subsequent miracle of the white sow that foretold the founding of Alba Longa. (David Sear, RCV 2000
RR17700. Silver denarius serratus, RSC I Sulpicia 1, S 189, Crawford 312/1, Sydenham 572, VF, weight 3.863 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 106 B.C.; obverse conjoined heads of the Dei Penates left, D P P before; reverse the Dei Penates standing facing, each holding spear and pointing at sow which lies between them, N above, C SVLPICI C F in exergue; two light scratches on reverse; SOLD


Roman Republic, C. Mamilius C.f. Limetanus, 82 B.C.

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This type alludes to the moneyer's claim of descent from Telegonus, son of Ulysses and Circe, and hence from Mercury -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
SH21139. Silver denarius serratus, SRCV I 282, Sydenham 741, Crawford 362/1, RSC I Mamilia 6, toned gVF, weight 3.661 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse bust of Mercury right wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder; reverse Ulysses walking right, staff in left hand, right extended toward his dog, Argus, C MAMIL downward on left, LIMETAN (AT ligate) upwards on right; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Friday, February 23, 2018.
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Trojan War