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Ancient Pottery

Ancient Israel, Four-Wick Saucer Oil Lamp, Middle Bronze Age, c. 2200 - 1550 B.C.

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According to tradition, Abraham was born in 2166 B.C. and traveled to Cannan in 2019 B.C.

This four-pinch or four wick type is the earliest type of oil lamp, made as early as 2200 B.C. The type was still made in the Middle Bronze Age to about 1550 B.C. By the end of that period, most lamps had only one pinch for only one wick.
AH21499. Four-wick oil lamp; Sussman p. 27, 3.19:5; Amiran pl. 59, 1; Adler 1.1.3; Schloessinger 311; Anawati -; 10.1 cm (4") long, 2.5 cm (1"), Choice, complete, intact, earthen deposits, Hebrew ink markings on bottom, Middle Bronze Age, c. 2200 - 1550 B.C.; pottery, coarse pinkish-buff clay, wheel made saucer, rim pushed inward on four sides, creating a squared form with a channels in each corner for a wick, slightly convex flat bottom, ex Alex G. Malloy; scarce; $350.00 (308.00)


Southern Israelite Monarchy, Pinched-Rim Stepped-Base Lamp, Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.

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The final phase of the Iron Age in Palestine ended in 586 B.C. with the destruction of the First Temple in Jerusalem by the Babylonians.

Sussman writes that thick heavy, ungainly bases of are characteristic of this last stage of the Iron Age - particularly in Southern Palestine. She also notes that the types is clumsier, receptacle smaller and many of the lamps are unstable (this one is stable). Alex Malloy says this type is scarce and is not found above Meggedo.
AH21501. Pinched-rim stepped-base lamp, Sussman p. 69, figure 8.38:2; Gerar 91u; Amiran -; 12.8 cm (5") wide, 11.8 cm (4 5/8") long, 5.9 cm (2 3/8") tall, Choice, complete except for tiny chip in the rim (visible in photo), a few thin cracks (probably as made), traces of a white slip, Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.; pinkish clay with traces of a white slip, wheel-made with pinched-in rim for wick, shallow receptacle with a broad fairly flat rim, stepped base with a distinct disk on a thick heavy heal; ex Alex G. Malloy; scarce; $280.00 (246.40)


Ancient Israel, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Late Bronze Age II, 1400 - 1200 B.C.

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This lamp has no rim. It is a simple shallow saucer with the sides folded (pinched) to make a triangular wick-rest. Its austerity of form and simple design indicate it is an early type of "pinched-rim" saucer lamp and date it to the Late Bronze Age. As is typical for the type, the walls and rim of wick channel are blackened indicating the wick burned within and along the channel, not just at the end.
AH21343. Pinched-rim oil lamp; Sussman p. 47, figure 5.29:1; Petrie Gerar 91e; 4.7 cm (1 7/8") high, 14.9 cm (5 7/8") long, 14.8 cm (5 3/4") wide, Choice, minor chipping on rim, earthen deposits, wheel-made with wheel marks on underside, gray-brown clay with a cream slip, thin-walled shallow bowl, without rim, v-shaped spout, round thick bottom made by adding clay to the underside of the turned bowl; ex Edgar L. Owen; $250.00 (220.00)


Ancient Israel, Pinched-Rim Saucer Oil Lamp, Middle Bronze Age II, c. 1730 - 1550 B.C.

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From the traditional time of Israel in Egypt.

The earliest Palestinian lamp was the wheel-made saucer with four pinched corners, forming a square lamp with four wick channels. Although the four wick lamp continued to be produced, this later one wick type became increasingly popular and became the prototype for almost all the lamps that followed.
AH21498. Pinched-rim saucer oil lamp; Sussman p. 45, 5.27:1; Amiran pl. 59, 9; Adler 1.1.7; Schloessinger 315; Gerar 91r; 10.1 cm (4") long, 2.5 cm (1") high, Collectible, complete, intact except for small chips in edge, base marked with ink, "MB IIB 1730 - 1550 BC", pottery, coarse pinkish-buff clay, wheel made shallow bowl, pinch in the rim for wick, pinch pulled outward to protrude from the body, simple flat bottom, ex Alex G. Malloy; $240.00 (211.20)


Ancient Israel, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Late Bronze I - Late Bronze IIA, 1550 - 1300 B.C.

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The similar referenced lamp, Sussman 665, was found at Gezer, Israel, an archaeological site in the foothills of the Judaean Mountains at the border of the Shfela region roughly midway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

This type of lamp has many nicknames including: pinched-rim, cocked hat, saucer, and shell type. With few exceptions, they can be roughly dated by the height of the base and the prominence of the rim opposite the nozzle. Both the height of the base and the width of the rim grew over time. On the earliest lamps the edge of the bowl is vertical with no outward folded rim. Most of the earliest lamps have a round bottom, with no distinct base. The last lamps of Southern Israel have a high stepped base comprised of a disk base on a distinct heel. On some of the latest Iron Age lamps the rim becomes so wide and the base so thick that the oil receptical appears somewhat impractically small. The simple pinched-rim form had a revival in the Hellenistic period, at which time the lamps were smaller and of a finer clay.
AH21270. Pinched-rim oil lamp; Sussman p. 54, figure 6.33; 665 (Gezer), Petrie Gerar 91p; 6.3 cm (2 1/2") high, 12.1 cm (4 3/4") long, 13.8 cm (5 3/8") wide, Choice, cracking, minor reconstruction, burn mark, Late Bronze I - Late Bronze IIA, 1550 - 1300 B.C.; wheel-made with wheel marks on underside (perhaps intended to be decorative), buff-brown clay with a cream slip, thin-walled shallow bowl, lip slightly everted, v-shaped spout, round thick bottom made by adding clay to the underside of the turned bowl; ex Edgar L. Owen; $200.00 (176.00)


Kingdom of Judah, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.

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Many similar lamps listed by Sussman were found at Tell Beit Mirsim, an archaeological site in Israel, on the border between the Shfela and Mount Hebron. It was excavated for four seasons (1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932) by William F. Albright. The site has "a town plan characteristic of the Kingdom of Judah that is also known from other sites" including, Beit Shemesh, Tell en-Nasbeh, Khirbet Qeiyafa and Beersheba. "A casemate wall was built at all of these sites and the city?s houses next to it incorporated the casemates as one of the dwelling?s rooms. This model is not known from any Canaanite, Philistine or Kingdom of Israel site."
AH21553. Pinched-rim lamp, Sussman p. 66, figure 7.37:1; 1387 ff. (Tell Beit Mirsim); 12.6 cm (5") wide, 12.7 cm (5") long, 4.7 cm (1 7/8") tall, Choice, complete and intact, much of slip remaining, small closed crack, a few very small rim chips, Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.; reddish clay with white slip, wheel-made, deep folds forming an elongated channel and U-shaped spout, shallow receptacle, rounded turned-out rim, thick bottom, disk base; ex Alex G. Malloy; $200.00 (176.00)


Ancient Israel, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Late Bronze IIB - Iron Age I, c. 1300 - 1000 B.C.

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This type of lamp has many nicknames including: pinched-rim, cocked hat, saucer, and shell type. With few exceptions, they can be roughly dated by the height of the base and the prominence of the rim opposite the nozzle. Both the height of the base and the width of the rim grew over time. On the earliest lamps the edge of the bowl is vertical with no outward folded rim. Most of the earliest lamps have a round bottom, with no distinct base. The last lamps of Southern Israel have a high stepped base comprised of a disk base on a distinct heel. On some of the latest Iron Age lamps the rim becomes so wide and the base so thick that the oil receptical appears somewhat impractically small. The simple pinched-rim form had a revival in the Hellenistic period, at which time the lamps were smaller and of a finer clay.
AH21344. Pinched-rim terracotta lamp; cf. Sussman p. 45, figure 5.28; Petrie Gerar 91l; 11.8 cm (4 5/8") wide, 11.5 cm (4 1/2") long, 5.2 cm (2") high, Choice, wear and tiny chips at the nozzle, Late Bronze IIB - Iron Age I, c. 1300 - 1000 B.C.; buff pottery wheel-made lamp, sides pushed-in (pinched) to create elongated wick channel, wide rounded turned-out rim, thick round bottom; ex Edgar L. Owen; $180.00 (158.40)


Greek, Athens(?), Miniature Pottery Oil Lamp, c. Late 6th - Early 5th Century B.C.

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The referenced lamp from Isthmia is a very similar miniature lamp with the same shape and same dull brown glaze on buff pottery. Broneer identifies it as, "probably a local [Athens] product." Broneer also writes, "There are no close parallels from the Athenian Agora. See Corinth IV, ii, p. 137, fig 61, which, however is later, as shown by the longer nozzle"
AH21462. Broneer Isthmia 59, cf. Corinth IV 61 (longer nozzle, later); 2.8 cm (1 1/8") high, 5.8 cm (2 1/4") long, Choice, complete and intact, much of brown slip lost, c. late 6th - early 5th century B.C.; wheel-turned, partial dull brown slip on slightly pink buff pottery, round, small projecting nozzle, concave discus, large fill hole, sides narrowing slightly to low round disc base, no handle; ex Edgar L. Owen; $160.00 (140.80)


Ancient Israel, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Late Bronze IIB - Iron Age I, c. 1300 - 1000 B.C.

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This type of lamp has many nicknames including: pinched-rim, cocked hat, saucer, and shell type. With few exceptions, they can be roughly dated by the height of the base and the prominence of the rim opposite the nozzle. Both the height of the base and the width of the rim grew over time. On the earliest lamps the edge of the bowl is vertical with no outward folded rim. Most of the earliest lamps have a round bottom, with no distinct base. The last lamps of Southern Israel have a high stepped base comprised of a disk base on a distinct heel. On some of the latest Iron Age lamps the rim becomes so wide and the base so thick that the oil receptical appears somewhat impractically small. The simple pinched-rim form had a revival in the Hellenistic period, at which time the lamps were smaller and of a finer clay.
AH21559. Pinched-rim terracotta lamp; cf. Sussman p. 54, figure 6.33, 567 (Tel Ro'e); 12.9 cm (5 1/8") wide, 12.6 cm (5") long, 4.5 cm (1 3/4") high, Average, small closed cracks in rim, flaking on bottom, Late Bronze IIB - Iron Age I, c. 1300 - 1000 B.C.; pinkish-buff pottery, wheel-made lamp, sides pushed-in (pinched) to create a V-shaped elongated wick channel, narrow rounded turned-out rim, thick round bottom; ex Alex G. Malloy; $160.00 (140.80)


Kingdom of Judah, Pinched-Rim Oil Lamp, Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Many similar lamps listed by Sussman were found at Tell Beit Mirsim, an archaeological site in Israel, on the border between the Shfela and Mount Hebron. It was excavated for four seasons (1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932) by William F. Albright. The site has "a town plan characteristic of the Kingdom of Judah that is also known from other sites" including, Beit Shemesh, Tell en-Nasbeh, Khirbet Qeiyafa and Beersheba. "A casemate wall was built at all of these sites and the city?s houses next to it incorporated the casemates as one of the dwelling?s rooms. This model is not known from any Canaanite, Philistine or Kingdom of Israel site."
AH21545. Pinched-rim lamp, Sussman p. 66, figure 7.37:1; 1387 ff. (Tell Beit Mirsim); 11.2 cm (4 3/8") wide, 12 cm (4 3/4") long, 5.7 cm (2 1/4") tall, Average, chipped nozzle (visible in photos), Iron Age IIC, 700 - 586 B.C.; reddish clay with cream slip, wheel-made with wheel marks on the outside (probably intended to be decorative), deep folds forming an elongated channel and U-shaped spout, shallow receptacle, near vertical saucer walls, rounded turned-out rim, thick bottom, rough irregular (carelessly made) disk base; ex Alex G. Malloy; $150.00 (132.00)




  



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Ancient Pottery