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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ HadrianopolisView Options:  |  |  |   

Hadrianopolis, Thrace

Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Asclepius, the son of Apollo and Koronis, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Hygieia, the goddess of health, was his daughter with Minerva. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in Asclepius' temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP41398. Bronze AE 28, BMC Thrace p. 116, 3, aVF, weight 13.457 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 225o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYTKAITAIA∆PI ANTΩNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse HΓAΠOYOΠEICKOYA∆PIANOΠOΛEIT, Asklepios standing facing, looking left, staff which serpent twines in left, Hygieia standing right, patera in right hand, feeding serpent; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Nemesis was the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers.
RP37474. Bronze AE 27, Varbanov II 3825 - 7 var. (obv. legend), gVF, weight 12.317 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 45o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Nemesis standing left, cubit rule in right hand, scepter in left hand, wheel at feet left; choice portrait; scarce; SOLD


Hadrianopolis, Thrace, c. 238 - 244 A.D.

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Hercules, assigned the labor of slaying the Hydra, quickly learned that when he cut off one of its heads two grew back. His nephew Iolaus aided him by quickly cauterizing the open stumps with a firebrand, preventing the heads from regrowing. Hera, who had created the Hydra to kill him, sent a large crab to distract him during the fight. But Hercules crushed the crab under his mighty foot and killed the Hydra.
GB56643. Bronze AE 18, Youroukova Hadrianople 709 (O298/R670), Moushmov 2479, Mionnet Suppl. II 604, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, SNG Fitzwilliam -, SNG Hunterian -, F, weight 2.251 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, c. 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse TON KTICTHN, bearded head of Herakles right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Herakles raising club against the Lernaean Hydra, which has wrapped itself around his leg, tree to left, bow and quiver upright behind him; very rare; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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RP28144. Bronze AE 31, Varbanov 3711, nice VF, weight 15.593 g, maximum diameter 31.3 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Apollo standing left, nude, branch in right hand, resting left on snake-entwined tripod; scarce; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Wandering the world in a panther-drawn chariot, Dionysus rode ahead of the maenads and satyrs, who sang loudly and danced, flushed with wine. They were profusely garlanded with ivy and held the thyrsus, a staff topped with a pine-cone, a symbol of the immortality of his believers. Everywhere he went he taught men how to cultivate vines, and the mysteries of his cult. Whoever stood in his way and refused to revere him was punished with madness.
RP29651. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 4004, gF, weight 10.554 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Dionysos, thyrsos in right, reclining left on back of panther walking right; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
RP39113. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3856-7 var. (obv. legend), gVF, weight 9.455 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 15o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AY, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, tetrastyle temple containing statue of Tyche with rudder in right and cornucopia in left; nice style and grade; rare variety; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
RP68077. Bronze AE 26, Jurukova 501, Varbanov II 3779 (R3), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, VF, weight 10.814 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 225o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓ (AYΓ ligate), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN (ΩN ligate), Dememter seated left, diademed, veiled and draped, poppy and grain in right hand, long torch vertical behind in left hand; scarce; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP84564. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3869 (R3), Jurukova Hadrianopolis 509, Mouchmov 2740, SNG Milan 439 var., SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, dark green patina, marks, central cavities, weight 12.138 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ (VΓ ligate), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Tyche-Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, wearing kalathos on head, holding grounded rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Agora Auctions, sale 53, lot 74; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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The river connected to Hadrianopolis is Hebros (Hebrus), today Maritsa or Evros, the longest river of the Balkans.
RP29624. Bronze AE 30, Varbanov II 4071, Choice F, weight 11.264 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC A\Γ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, river-god reclining left, plant in right, left elbow resting on vase from which water flows; scarce; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Helios was the ancient Greek personification of the sun. Each day he drove the chariot of the sun across the sky.
RP34837. Bronze AE 27, Varbanov II 4011 - 4012, VF, weight 8.097 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC [...], laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Helios advancing left, extending right, torch in left; green patina; scarce; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES

Brett, A.B. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Jurukova, Y. The Coinage of the Towns in Moesia Inferior and Thrace, 2nd-3rd centuries AD: Hadrianopolis. (Sophia. 1987).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T.E. Description de Mťdailles antiques grecques et romaines, Supplement 2: Thrace. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Italy, Milano, Civiche Raccolte Numismatiche, VI. Macedonia - Thracia, Part 3: Chersonesus Tauricus, Sarmatia, Thracia, Chersonesus Thraciae, Isole della Thracia. (Milan, 2000).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).
Youroukova, Y. The Coinage of the Towns in Moesia Inferior and Thrace, 2nd-3rd centuries AD: Hadrianople. (Sophia. 1987).

Catalog current as of Monday, March 25, 2019.
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Hadrianopolis