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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ ViminaciumView Options:  |  |  | 

Viminacium, Moesia Superior

Viminacium, a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 240 A.D. and the capital of the Roman province of Moesia Superior, was located about 20 km to the east of modern Kostolac, Serbia. The usual legend on colonial coinage is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium and the usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII Claudia and IV Flavia Felix, which were quartered in the province. The rebel Pacatian opened his mint at Viminacium in 248. Valerian also opened an imperial mint at Viminacium. The city was destroyed in 440 by the Huns, rebuilt by Justinian I, and destroyed again by the Avars in 584.


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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The PAX AVGG type with this obverse legend is missing from the major references, except one. It is a die match to Gbl MIR 835c. We were unable to find another example online. Perhaps all examples of this very rare variant were struck with this single die pair.
RS90027. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 835c (same dies), RIC V -, RSC IV -, Hunter IV -, SRCV III -, F, irregular flan shape, small edge cracks, porous, weight 2.363 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 3rd emission, c. 257 - 258 A.D.; obverse IMP VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing half left, raising olive branch in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand; very rare; $50.00 (44.50)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS64741. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 815d, RIC V 245 (Milan), RSC IV 147 (Milan), cf. SRCV III 9954 (...P F AVG, Rome), Hunter IV -, aVF, excellent portrait, small flan split, weight 4.332 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 2nd emission, 254 - 255 A.D.; obverse IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing half left, raising olive branch in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand; $34.00 (30.26)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RS64738. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1566a (Antioch), RSC IV 241 (Viminacium), Hunter IV 66 (eastern), RIC V 225 (S, Rome), SRCV III -, F, porous spots of corrosion, weight 3.544 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 0o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 254 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Virtus standing half right, wearing military garb, spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield at side; scarce; $30.00 (26.70)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior

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Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
RP71499. Bronze AE 28, H-J Viminacium 32 (R2); Varbanov I 138 (R3); AMNG I/I 105; BMC Thrace p. 17, 25, aF, well centered, rough, encrusted, weight 15.422 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 45o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 247 - 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M S COL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN VIIII (year 9 of the Viminacium colonial era) in exergue; $28.00 (24.92)







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REFERENCES

Boric-Brescovic, B. Coins of the Colony of Viminacium. (Belgrade, 1976).
Hristova, N. and G. Jekov. The Local Coinage of the Roman Empire - Moesia Superior, Viminacium. (Blagoevgrad, 2004).
Martin, F. Kolonial Prgungen aus Moesia Superior und Dacia. (Budapest-Bonn, 1992).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Pick, B. and K. Regling. Die antiken Mnzen von Dacien und Mesien, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1910).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hungary, Budapest, Magyar Nemzeti Mzeum, II: Dacia-Moesia superior. (Milan, 1994).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, (English Edition), Volume I: Dacia, Moesia Superior & Moesia Inferior. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).

Catalog current as of Thursday, April 27, 2017.
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Viminacium