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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Grapes & WineView Options:  |  |  |   

Grapes and Wine on Ancient Coins

Coins related to grapes and wine are popular. Of course, we also include in this theme coins depicting the gods of wine - Dionysus, Bacchus, and Liber.


Greek, Bronze Krater(?) Handle, Ornamented With Head of Dionysos, c. 400 - 200 B.C.

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This handle was probably once attached to a krater, a punch-bowl type vessel used for diluting and serving wine. The earliest kraters were bronze and almost exclusively the volute-type. Very few bronze kraters have survived. Most often only the handles remain.
AG40492. Greek bronze krater(?) handle, height 12.7 cm (4 5/8"), ornamented with facing head of Dionysos, $1000.00 (890.00)


Roman Bronze Vessel Handle, Ornamented With Bacchus and a Panther, c. 1st Century A.D.

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The Panther was the companion of Bacchus. The grapevine and its wild barren alter-ego, the toxic ivy plant, were both sacred to him. This handle was once attached to vessel used for serving or drinking wine.
AI30971. height 8.0 cm (3"), excellent condition with a nice green patina, bronze vessel handle ornamented with a facing young head of Bacchus wearing an ivy wreath in his long flowing hair, panther skin tied at neck, the curving handle ends with a panther head; $750.00 (667.50)


Kalakte, Sicily, 240 - 210 B.C.

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Kalakte was founded by the Duketios, the Hellenized leader of the Sicels, in 446 B.C. when he returned from his exile in Corinth. The name means beautiful beach. Nothing else is known of the city until Roman times when it became a civitas decumana, paying 1/10th of its annual harvest to Rome. Kalakte was the birthplace of Caecilius of Calacte, historian of the servile wars. The city survived until at least the second century A.D.
GI76362. Bronze quadrans, Calciati I p. 129, 2 Ds 1; SNG ANS 1200; SNG Morcom 545; BMC Sicily p. 32, 3; HGC 2 513 (R1), F, glossy green patina, weight 2.689 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kalakte (Caronia, Sicily) mint, 240 - 210 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of young Dionysos right, thyrsos over left (far) shoulder; reverse KAΛA-KTINΩN (upward on left and right), grape bunch on vine tendril; rare; $350.00 (311.50)


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 405 - 395 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power of at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS74435. Silver tetartemorion, BCD Boiotia 466; BMC Central p. 77, 87; SNG Cop 294; Brend Fractions 35; Head Boeotia 37, Choice VF, toned, weight 0.163 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, Thebes mint, 405 - 395 B.C.; obverse Boiotian ox-hide shield; reverse bunch of grapes on stem, Θ−E flanking above; ex BCD Collection; $320.00 (284.80)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79632. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XIV, monogram 24, cf. 1100 - 1104 (V CD3 / -); SNG Cop 1046, VF, centered, toned, struck with a worn obverse die, scrape on chin, scratches and marks, weight 16.690 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, monogram inner left; $300.00 (267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79633. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., aVF, nice style Herakles, some marks, small edge crack, weight 16.560 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (267.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79635. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XVI, 1226 (O DD4 / R 989); SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, nice style, light toning, bumps and scratches, die wear, weight 16.787 g, maximum diameter 33.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, MH monogram inner left; $300.00 (267.00)


Lix, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 50 - 1 B.C.

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Ancient Lixus is located within modern Larache, on the right bank of Loukkos River the about three kilometers inland from the Atlantic ocean. Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century B.C. and was later annexed by Carthage. When Carthage fell to Rome, Lixus became an imperial outpost of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana. Among the ruins, there are Roman baths, temples, 4th-century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate remains of the Capitol Hill.
GB84540. Bronze AE 26, Alexandropoulos MAA 167, Mazard 630, Mller Afrique 234, SNG Cop 692, SGCV II 6643, aF, light corrosion, weight 9.762 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lixus (Larache, Morocco) mint, c. 50 - 1 B.C.; obverse male head left (Chusor-Phtah?), with conical hat with long tassel; reverse two bunches of grapes, neo-Punic inscription: LKS (above), MPL (below); rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

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Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB72290. Bronze AE 17, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613 var. (divided ethnic); BMC Italy p. 131, 12 var. (same), VF, green patina, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 225o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY (upward on left), bunch of grapes; rare; $135.00 (120.15)


Arpi, Apulia, Italy, 215 - 212 B.C., Struck Under Hannibal

Click for a larger photo
Arpi remained faithful to Rome until Rome's defeat at the battle of Cannae and then defected to Hannibal. Rome captured Arpi in 213 or 212 B.C. and it never recovered its former importance. No Roman inscriptions have been found there, and remains of antiquity are scanty.
GB73614. Bronze AE 20, HN Italy 650; SNG ANS 646; SNG Cop 613; BMC Italy p. 131, 12, F, weight 3.792 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 270o, Arpi (near Foggia, Italy) mint, 215 - 212 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse APΠANOY, bunch of grapes; rare; $135.00 (120.15)




  



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