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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ TroasView Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Troas

The Troad or Troas is the historical name of the Biga Yarimadasi peninsula in the northwestern Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join near the ruins of Troy. The Kingdom of Pergamum ceded the territory to the Roman Republic.


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Alexandria Troas, Troas

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The representation of the decurions of Alexandria depicted on the reverse of this type is unique within the Roman provincial series. The decurions were members of municipal senates responsible for procuring funds for new public works, festivities and games, as well as for welfare networks. Their fiscal responsibilities also extended to the collecting of imperial taxes, for which they were expected to cover any shortfalls.
RP87204. Bronze AE 22, RPC IX 432 (12 spec.); Bellinger A409; SNG Çanakkale 376; BMC Troas p. 27, 145; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, dark green patina, reverse slightly off center, tiny encrustations, some legend weak, edge cracks, weight 4.586 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, Jun/Jul 251 - Jul/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse IMP C VIBI TRIBO GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse The curia decurionum of Alexandria in session: nine men wearing togas seated in a semicircle, two outer men seated on curule chairs, two in center holding short staffs, AVG above, two steps below, ALEXAND on upper step, decorative pattern on lower step, TROADA in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 40 (28 Oct 2017), lot 429; very rare; $1300.00 (€1144.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") was a nobleman and strategos (general and governor) under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
SL89826. Silver drachm, Price 1560; ADM II, Series XIX, 375; Müller Alexander 252; SNG Cop 972; SNG Berry 158; SNG München 486, HGC 3.1 -, Ch AU, strike 4/5, surface 5/5, posthumous Alexander III (4166087-001), weight 4.30 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos (near Canakkale, Turkey) mint, 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp as headdress, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, ME monogram left, ivy leaf under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; from the Martineit Collection of Ancient and World Coins; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Abydos, Troas, 4th Century B.C.

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Abydos is located on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Dardanelles), at the shortest crossing point, scarcely a mile across from Sestus on the European side. In the Iliad, Abydos was an ally of the Trojans (Iliad ii.836) and it is the mythical home of Leander. Persians occupied it in 514 B.C. and Darius burned it in 512. When he invaded Greece in 480 B.C., Xerxes built his two bridges of boats across the strait from Abydos. Abydos became a member of the Delian League, but revolted against Athens in 411 B.C. It allied itself to Sparta, until 394 B.C. Then it passed under Achaemenid rule until 334. Alexander the Great threw a spear to Abydos while crossing the strait and claimed Asia as his own. Abydos is celebrated for the vigorous resistance it made against Philip V of Macedon in 200 B.C. The city minted coins from the early fifth century B.C. to the mid-third century A.D.
GS91349. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Berry 979; SNG Cop 9; BMC Troas p. 3, 17; SNG München 12 (club in exergue); SNGvA -, gF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, minor deposits, weight 2.519 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Abydos mint, magistrate Efaistoleos, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ABY, eagle standing right, Nike holding wreath flying left (control symbol) lower left, HΦAIΣTOΛEΩΣ (magistrate name) downward on right, club(?) left below; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, 3rd Century A.D.

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Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
RP87273. Bronze AE 22, SNG Tübingen 2534 (same dies); SNG Canakkale 536 (same); SNG Hunt 1270; SNG Cop 114; SNGvA 7553; Bellinger Troy A490; BMC Troas -; SNG Mün -, EF, nearly as struck, flan adjustment marks, reverse legend weak, tiny edge cracks, weight 5.202 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 3rd century A.D.; obverse COL TROA, turreted and draped bust of Tyche of Alexandria Troas right, vexillum behind inscribed CO / AV; reverse CO AVG TRO, eagle flying right, bull forepart right its talons; $105.00 (€92.40)
 


Larissa-Ptolemais, Troas, 3rd Century B.C.

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Imhoof-Blumer attributed this type to Ptolemais in Pamphylia, but in Hill convincingly argued against that city. Waddington was of the opinion that these coins might belong to Lebedos under the name Ptolemais. L. Robert in Monnaies antiques en Troade (Paris, 1966), p. 56, suggests Larissa-Ptolemais in Troas. Most recent auction listings accept Robert's attribution but the identity of the city is by no means certain.
GB88082. Bronze AE 13, SNGvA 2026 (Lebedos-Ptolemais, Ionia), BMC Troas -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tübingen -, SNG München -, Winterthur -, Klein -, VF, nice dark patina, some porosity, earthen deposits, weight 1.988 g, maximum diameter 13.1 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa-Ptolemais mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIEΩ, amphora; very rare; $95.00 (€83.60)
 


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 450 - 387 B.C.

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Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid, in the latter as the island where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls. The island was important throughout classical antiquity despite its small size due to its strategic location at the entrance of the Dardanelles. In the following centuries, the island came under the control of a succession of regional powers, including the Persian Empire, the Delian League, Alexander the Great, the Kingdom of Pergamon, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Republic of Venice. As a result of the War of Chioggia (1381) between Genoa and Venice the entire population was evacuated and the town was demolished. The Ottoman Empire established control over the deserted island in 1455. During Ottoman rule, it was resettled by both Greeks and Turks. In 1807, the island was temporarily invaded by the Russians. During this invasion, the town was burnt down and many Turkish residents left the island.Map of Troas
GS91378. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 508; SNGvA 7665; BMC Troas p. 92, 9; SNG München -; HGC 6 -, aF, toned, tight flan, weight 1.622 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 180o, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 387 B.C.; obverse archaic janiform head, female on left, male on right (Hera and Zeus?); reverse labrys (double axe), T-E/N-E in two lines divided by ax handle, all within a shallow incuse square; scarce; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Dardanos, Troas, 4th Century B.C.

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In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB87737. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 303; BMC Troas p. 50, 18; SNGvA -; SNG München -; SNG Tüb -, F, porous, corrosion, weight 6.069 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 270o, Dardanos mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, raising right hand, wearing petasos, chlamys flying behind; reverse cock right, standing erect, ∆AP above, grain ear right below; scarce; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Dardanos, Troas, 4th Century B.C.

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In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB87738. Bronze AE 15, BMC Troas p. 48, 6; SNG Cop 287; SNGvA -; SNG Tübingen -; SNG München -, F, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, weight 3.964 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Dardanos mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys flying behind, ΦIΛO KPA and owl below horse; reverse cock right, standing erect, ∆AP above, star over Athena Promachos in right field; rare; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Dardanos, Troas, c. 4th Century B.C.

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In mythology, Dardanos was founded by Dardanus, from whom the city, the region and the people took their name. It lay on the Hellespont, and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles. From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained the additional name of Trojans and the region gained the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus subsequently founded a city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium) down on the plain, the city now commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania. The Dardani people appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets.The Troad
GB89025. Bronze AE 11, SNG Cop 290; SNG Ashmolean 1126; BMC Troas p. 49, 10; SNGvA -; SNG München -; SNG Tübingen -, gF, dark patina with buff earthen highlighting, obverse off center, marks, weight 1.207 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 180o, Dardanos mint, c. 4th Century B.C.; obverse horseman galloping right, wearing chiton, chlamys (flying behind) and petasos, raising right hand; reverse cock standing right, race torch (control symbol) upper left, ∆APdownward on right; ex Numismatik Lanz; rare; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Birytis, Troas, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.

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Birytis' precise location in western Asia Minor remains unknown but it probably stood either south of Troy or near Hellespont. Numismatics provides our only evidence this city existed.

The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.

GB79803. Bronze AE 10, SNG Cop 251, SNG München 171, SGCV II 4059, VF, attractive green patina, light corrosion, weight 1.052 g, maximum diameter 9.8 mm, die axis 0o, Birytis mint, c. 4th - 3rd Centuries B.C.; obverse bearded head of Kabeiros right wearing pileus; reverse triskeles formed by three crescents, B-I/PY around clockwise divided by triskeles, P reversed, linear border; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 21 (31 Oct 2015), lot 235; $70.00 (€61.60)
 




  



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REFERENCES

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Bellinger, A. Troy, The Coins. (Princeton, 1961).
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Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
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Müller, L. Numismatique d'Alexandre le Grand; Appendice les monnaies de Philippe II et III, et Lysimaque. (Copenhagen, 1855-58).
Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeusr. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus - Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas-Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien - Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. (London, 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 9: Bosporus - Aeolis. (London, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge. (Oxford, 1972 - 1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain - Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden II, The Collection of the Royal Coin Cabinet, National Museum of Monetary History, Part 3: Attica-Lesbos. (Stockholm, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 3, Canakkale Museum Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 4, Ancient Coins from Mysia, Troad and Aeolis in the Collection of Selcuk Tanrikulu. (Istanbul, 2010).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 9, The Özkan Arıkantürk Collection, Vol. 1: Troas. (Istanbul, 2015).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.
Waggoner, N. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Troas, Aeolis and Lesbos. (London, 1894).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, July 17, 2019.
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Troas