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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Troas||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins of Troas

The Troad or Troas is the historical name of the Biga Yarimadasi peninsula in the northwestern Turkey. Bounded by the Dardanelles to the northwest, by the Aegean Sea to the west and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida, the Troad is drained by two main rivers, the Scamander (Karamenderes) and the Simois, which join near the ruins of Troy. The Kingdom of Pergamum ceded the territory to the Roman Republic.


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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SH48869. Gold stater, Price 1568, Müller Alexander 373, gVF, weight 8.640 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos (near Canakkale, Turkey) mint, posthumous, c. 310 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, monogram and cornucopia left; high relief, well centered, mint luster, nice!; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck under Leonnatos, Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos. Philip III Arrhidaeus, the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa, was Alexander the Great's half-brother. Alexander's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned him as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Incapable of actual rule, he was made king upon Alexander's death only to serve as a pawn for those who wished to grab power for themselves. Olympias had him imprisoned and then ordered his execution in 317 B.C.
SH86159. Gold stater, Price P38; ADM II Series XI, 159a; Müller Alexander P64, aEF, some luster, well centered, attractive style, edge bump, weight 8.519 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos (near Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet ornamented with a coiled snake, wearing necklace and long drop earring; reverse Nike standing slightly left, head left, wreath in extended right hand, grounded stylis in left hand at her side, MH monogram over pentagram outer left, coiled snake under left wing; ex CNG auction 108, lot 189; SOLD


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

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Silenus, the old man of the forest with horse ears (sometimes also a horse tail and legs), was the oldest, wisest and most drunken of the followers of Dionysus, and was said in Orphic hymns to be the young god's tutor. He was usually drunk and had to be supported by satyrs or carried by a donkey. When intoxicated, he possessed special knowledge and the power of prophecy. Eager to learn from Silenus, King Midas caught the old man by lacing a fountain from which Silenus often drank. Silenus shared with the king a pessimistic philosophy: That the best thing for a man is not to be born, and if already born, to die as soon as possible. In another myth, when lost and wandering in Phrygia, Silenus was rescued by peasants and taken to King Midas, who treated him kindly and entertained him for five days and nights. Dionysus offered Midas a reward for his kindness towards Silenus, and Midas chose the power of turning everything he touched into gold.
RP71870. Bronze AE 24, Bellinger Troy A435; SNG Cop 194; SNG München 125; BMC Troas p. 30, 165; SNGvA - (refs ID the central figure as drunken Hercules), gVF, grainy surfaces, weight 6.082 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria, Troas mint, obverse IMP LIC VALERIANVS AVG (N retrograde), Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL A-VG, TROAC (ending in exergue, AC ligate), Silenus standing half right, supported by three satyrs, one standing behind with arms around his waist, and two more at sides; very rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lampsacus was known as a center for worship of Priapus, who was said to have been born there.

Thompson notes that Lampsacus was Lysimachos' largest mint in Asia Minor, with approximately 150 known obverse dies. Output from Lampsacus declined when Amphipolis began its extensive coinage c. 288 B.C.
SH66383. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 58, Müller 90, SNG Cop -, VF, scratches, weight 16.491 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 45o, Lampsacus mint, 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, rests arm on shield, transverse spear against right side, holds Nike crowning name, herm outer left, monogram inner left; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH81475. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 159, Müller 433 (Ephesus), SGCV II 6814 var. (monograms), gVF, weight 16.683 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Troas, Abydos (near Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, rests left arm on shield, transverse spear against right side, Nike crowning name in right, (AP monogram) over bee inner left, thunderbolt in exergue; SOLD


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 450 - 387 B.C.

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Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid, in the latter as the island where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls. The island was important throughout classical antiquity despite its small size due to its strategic location at the entrance of the Dardanelles. In the following centuries, the island came under the control of a succession of regional powers, including the Persian Empire, the Delian League, Alexander the Great, the Kingdom of Pergamon, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Republic of Venice. As a result of the War of Chioggia (1381) between Genoa and Venice the entire population was evacuated and the town was demolished. The Ottoman Empire established control over the deserted island in 1455. During Ottoman rule, it was resettled by both Greeks and Turks. In 1807, the island was temporarily invaded by the Russians. During this invasion, the town was burnt down and many Turkish residents left the island.Map of Troas
SH34867. Silver drachm, SNG München 347, SNG Cop 513, VF, weight 3.465 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 387 B.C.; obverse janiform head of a diademed female left and laureate male right; reverse TE−NE−∆I−ON, labrys, grape bunch and lyre flanking handle, all within incuse square; some horn silver and lamination defects; rare; SOLD


Tenedos, Troas, c. 450 - 387 B.C.

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Tenedos is mentioned in both the Iliad and the Aeneid, in the latter as the island where the Greeks hid their fleet near the end of the Trojan War in order to trick the Trojans into believing the war was over and into taking the Trojan Horse within their city walls. The island was important throughout classical antiquity despite its small size due to its strategic location at the entrance of the Dardanelles. In the following centuries, the island came under the control of a succession of regional powers, including the Persian Empire, the Delian League, Alexander the Great, the Kingdom of Pergamon, the Roman Empire, the Byzantine Empire, and the Republic of Venice. As a result of the War of Chioggia (1381) between Genoa and Venice the entire population was evacuated and the town was demolished. The Ottoman Empire established control over the deserted island in 1455. During Ottoman rule, it was resettled by both Greeks and Turks. In 1807, the island was temporarily invaded by the Russians. During this invasion, the town was burnt down and many Turkish residents left the island.Map of Troas
SH19456. Silver drachm, BMC Troas p. 93, 14 (same dies), gVF, toned, weight 3.376 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 387 B.C.; obverse male and female janiform head (Zeus and Hera?); reverse TENE-∆-I-ON, large double-axe, kantharos right, grapes left, all in incuse square; rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and the Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH58576. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson 163, Müller -, VF, weight 16.631 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, c. 297 - 281 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Athena enthroned left, holding Nike crowning name with wreath in right hand, resting left arm on shield at side, transverse spear behind, wreath outer left, Σ exergue; ex ACCG Benefit Auction, Aug 2008, lot 21; ex Freeman and Sear; SOLD


Assos, Troas, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

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Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GS85697. Silver triobol, Traité II 2304 var. (AΣΣOON), cf. Weber 5320 (drachm), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mün –, SNG Ash –, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Keckman -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, a little porous, weight 1.743 g, maximum diameter 12.1 mm, die axis 90o, Assus mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse helmeted and laureate head of Athena left; reverse AΣΣION (retrograde), roaring lion head left, within square incuse; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 49, lot 177; very rare; SOLD


Assos, Troas, 430 - 400 B.C.

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Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GA46614. Silver hemidrachm, Possibly unpublished; cf. Weber 5320 (drachm), Traité 2303 (same); Klein -, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Keckman -, Rosen -, VF, porous, weight 1.704 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 45o, Assus mint, obverse helmeted and laureate head of Athena left; reverse AΣΣOON, roaring lion head left, within square incuse; extremely rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bellinger, A. Troy, The Coins. (Princeton, 1961).
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de Callataÿ, F. "Les monnaies hellénistiques en argent de Tenedos" in Studies Price.
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Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, and Carpathian Seas (Excluding Crete and Cyprus), 6th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 6. (Lancaster/London, 2010).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
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Price, M. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeusr. (London, 1991).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 4: Bosporus - Lesbos. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 19: Troas-Lesbos. (Berlin, 1991).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge. (Oxford, 1972 - 1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain - Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden II, The Collection of the Royal Coin Cabinet, National Museum of Monetary History, Part 3: Attica-Lesbos. (Stockholm, 1991).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 3, Canakkale Museum Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 4, Ancient Coins from Mysia, Troad and Aeolis in the Collection of Selcuk Tanrikulu. (Istanbul, 2010).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Turkey 9, The Özkan Arıkantürk Collection, Vol. 1: Troas. (Istanbul, 2015).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, Burton Y. Berry Collection, Part 2. Megaris to Egypt. (New York, 1962).
Thompson, M. "The Mints of Lysimachus," in Essays Robinson.
Waggoner, N. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Troas, Aeolis and Lesbos. (London, 1894).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
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Troas