Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ IoniaView Options:  |  |  |   

Ionia

Ionia lies in central Western Anatolia (Asia Minor) on the shores of the Aegean Sea. The region is rather small and mountainous unsuited for agriculture but excellent for seafaring. Greek settlement took place in the 11th to 10th Centuries B.C. despite hostilities with the native Luwians (Indo-European people related to the Hittites and Lycians). After resisting fairly well to the Cimmerian invasion, the Ionians were gradually conquered by the Lycian Kingdom, and later by the Persian Empire. Ionia was freed by Alexander but became a contested prize for the Hellenistic kings, until the last king of Pergamum bequeathed his land to Rome. Ionia offered the world countless philosophers and men of science, and a fabulous school of art.


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
As reported by B.V. Head in Chapter 5 of Excavations at Ephesus: The Archaic Artemisia, a coin of this type was one of five coins found in excavations underneath the foundations of the southern wall of the B cella of the Artemisia at Ephesus. The other four coins were lion head and lion paw types. Head wrote these coins must have been deposited during construction of the First Temple (A). Weidauer 145 is the coin found at the Artemisia (= Head Artemisia 79), now at the Arkeoloji Müzesi, Istanbul. The Weidauer coins appear to be struck with the same obverse die.
SH84450. Electrum 1/24 stater, Milesian standard; Weidauer 145 - 146; Head Artemisia p. 86 and pl. 2, 79; cf. SNGvA 1781 (different style); Rosen 287 (same); SNG Kayhan 717 (same), gVF, centered, edge cracks, some die rust (also found on other examples of this type), weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 6.2 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse bridled head and neck of Pegasos left, with top edge of wing visible; reverse four raised squares in a cross pattern within incuse square punch; very rare; $1800.00 (€1602.00)


Vespasian the Younger, Caesar, 94 - 95 A.D., Smyrna, Ionia

Click for a larger photo
In 94 A.D., because he had no heir, Domitian adopted his two young great-nephews. He renamed them Vespasian and Domitian. The next year he executed the boys' father, his cousin, Titus Flavius Clemens, and exiled the boys' mother, his niece, Flavia Domitilla. They were charged with Atheism, a charge sometimes applied to condemn converts to Judaism or Christianity. The boys then disappeared from history and their fate is unknown.

Smyrna was the only city to strike coins in the name of Vespasian the Younger. No coins were struck for his brother.

Some scholars connect Domitilla with a Roman Matron in the Talmud (Avodah Zarah 10b) and the Deuteronomy Rabbah 2.25. When the emperor had decreed that in 30 days, the Senate would confirm an edict to kill all Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire, the Roman matron convinced her husband to stand up for the Jews. If that identification is correct, her husband Flavius Clemens converted to Judaism, after having contact with the great sage Rabbi Akiva. Flavia Domitilla is a saint in both the Greek Orthodox and the Roman Catholic Church.
SH83453. Bronze AE 16, Klose p. 244, 3, pl. 31 (V1/R1); RPC II 1028; SNG Cop 1360; SNGvA 2208; BMC Ionia p. 276, 320, gF/F, weight 2.790 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Smyrna mint, as caesar, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse OYOCΠACIANOC NEΩTEPOC, bare head right; reverse ZMYPNAIΩN, Nike standing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand; ex Solidus Numismatik, auction 7, lot 200; rare; $1300.00 (€1157.00)


Ionia, c. 650 - 600 B.C., Rough Irregular "Typeless" Type

Click for a larger photo
Some sales catalogs describe similar coins as the striated type. The roughly parallel lines on the striated type appear to be impressed into the "obverse" by lines cut into the anvil. On this coin, it appears the rough irregular "typeless" surface is simply flattened rough pre-strike features from the raw irregular nugget-like "planchet." Based on the apparent wear on the reverse punch, huge numbers of this type may have been struck. Very few have survived. This is the first example handled by Forum.
SH77378. Electrum 1/24 stater, cf. SNGvA 7768, SNG Kayhan 682, Traité I 14 -15, Weidauer -, Rosen -, VF, weight 0.647 g, maximum diameter 5.7 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, 650 - 600 B.C.; obverse flattened rough irregular "typeless" surface; reverse roughly square incuse pyramidal punch with striated sides, divided roughly in half by a raised irregular line, striated sides and the irregular line appear to be the result of wear; very rare; $1080.00 (€961.20)


Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The referenced coins are not very similar. It might be more appropriate to describe this coin as unpublished but perhaps the pattern is purely random and it is from the same mint and issue as the Kayhan or Von Aulock coin.
SH76827. Electrum 1/24 stater, cf. SNG Kayhan 688, SNGvA 7768, (neither very similar), Weidauer -, Rosen -, Traité I -, Mitchiner ATEC -, Zhuyuetang -, VF, weight 0.710 g, maximum diameter 6.8 mm, uncertain Ionian mint, c. 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse random(?) pattern of shapes and pellets; reverse a roughly square incuse punch with a central pellet surrounded by a random(?) pattern of curved lines; $570.00 (€507.30)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., Struck in the Name of Philip

Click for a larger photo
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. Perdikkas held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH75320. Silver drachm, Price P43, Müller Alexander P50, SNG München 938, aEF, some die wear, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - c. 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, lyre left; ex Forum (2005); $180.00 (€160.20)


Klazomenai, Ionia, c. 386 - 301 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The ruins of Klazomenai (or Clazomenae) are in the modern town Urla near Izmir in Izmir Province, Turkey. It was one of the first cities to issue silver coinage. Clazomenae was attacked by the Lydian king Alyattes II in the 6th century. During the 5th century it was for some time subject to the Athenians, but about the middle of the Peloponnesian War, c. 412 B.C. it revolted. After a brief resistance, it again acknowledged the Athenian supremacy, and repelled a Lacedaemonian attack. In 387 B.C. Klazomenai and other cities in Asia were taken over by Persia, but the city continued to issue its own coins. Under the Romans, Clazomenae was included in the province of Asia, and enjoyed an immunity from taxation.
GB72669. Brass AE 16, BMC Ionia p. 24, 56; SNG Cop 85; SNG München 484; SNGvA 1993, gVF, weight 4.894 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Klazomenai (Urla, Turkey) mint, c. 386 - 301 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena, head turned slightly right, wearing triple crested helmet, earrings and necklace; reverse ram walking right, KΛAZOME/NIΩN in two lines above, uncertain control symbol (trophy?) right; ex Roger Liles Collection; rare; $160.00 (€142.40)


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 320 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Struck by Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed") as strategos of Asia (320 - 306 B.C.) or as king (306 - 301 B.C.). Antigonos I was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C.
GS75260. Silver drachm, cf. Price 1789 ff., Müller Alexander 1603 ff., SNG Cop 917 f., SNG München 513 ff. (all with various symbols under throne), VF, nice style, well centered on a crowded flan, light marks and scratches, small areas of encrustation, weight 4.235 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around waist and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, SW monogram left, uncertain symbol under throne(?); $155.00 (€137.95)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Struck in the Name of Alexander the Great

Click for a larger photo
Colophon struck this commemorative in the name of Alexander the Great under the rule of Lysimachus. The city also issued the same type with the same symbols in the name of King Lysimachus (examples are listed in Forum's catalog). Colophon was about 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Ephesus.
GS76133. Silver drachm, Price 1843, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG München -, SNG Alpha Bank -, VF, well centered, toned, scratches, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 301 - 297 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, crescent horns right over lion-forepart left in left field, pentagram under throne; $155.00 (€137.95)


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachus, 305 - 281 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Lysimachus, a bodyguard for Alexander the Great, was made a strategos (general) after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors) of Alexander who divided the empire and continually allied and warred with each other. In 305, he took the title of basileus (king), ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. He was killed in battle against Seleukos.

Colophon was about 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Ephesus. The same type with the same symbols was also issued by Colophon in the name of Alexander (examples are listed in Forum's catalog).
GS84602. Silver drachm, Price L23, Thompson 123, Müller L19, SGCV II 6812, gF, well centered, toned, weight 4.000 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 299 - c. 296 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, lion forepart and crescent left, pentagram under throne; from the Lawrence Woolslayer Collection, ex Forum (2004); $155.00 (€137.95)


Samos, Islands of Ionia, c. 300 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Samos is the birth place of Pythagoras. A famous attraction on the island is the tunnel-aqueduct dug through a mountain to bring water to the city from an inland secret the spring. An engineering marvel over 1000m long, it was dug from both ends by two teams working simultaneously and used for a very long period. Herodotus' wrote of it, which led to its discovery in the 19th century.
GB83703. Bronze AE 18, cf. SNG Cop 1704 - ; BMC Ionia p. 365, 168 - 170; HGC 6 1252 (S); SNGvA -, F, nice green patina, weight 6.058 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Samos mint, c. 300 B.C.; obverse head of Hera left, wearing stephane and necklace; reverse lion's scalp facing, magistrate's name (off flan) below; ex Ancient Imports; very scarce; $145.00 (€129.05)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des médailles. (Paris, 1897-1898).
Balcer, J. M. "The Early Coinage of Teos" in SNR 47. (1968).
Bauslaugh, R.A. "The posthumous Alexander coinage of Chios" in ANSMN 24 (1979).
Bodenstedt, F. Die Elektronmünzen von Phokaia und Mytilene. (Tübingen, 1981).
Brett, A.B. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Deppert-Lippitz, B. Die Münzprägung Milets vom vierten bis ersten Jahrhundert v. Chr. Typos V. (Aarau, 1984).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922 - 1929).
Head, B. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Ionia. (London, 1892).
Jones, M. "The Autonomous Wreathed Tetradrachms of Magnesia on Maeander" in MN 24. (New York, 1979).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen, Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Klose, D.O.A. Die Münzprägung von Smyrna in der römischen Kaiserzeit. AMUGS X. (Berlin, 1987).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H., and F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Linzalone, J. Electrum And The Invention of Coinage. (New Jersey, 2011).
MacDonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection. (Glascow, 1899)
Marcellesi, M.-C. Milet des Hécatomnides à la domination romaine. Milesische Forschungen Bd. 3. (Mainz, 2004).
Milne, J.G. "The Autonomous Coinage of Smyrna" in NC 1923, 1927, and 1928.
Mionnet, T. E. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Price, M. J. The Coinage of in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. (London, 1991).
Schultz, S. Die Münzprägung von Magnesia am Mäander in der Römischen Kaiserzeit. (Berlin, 1975).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 5: Ionia, Caria and Lydia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 20: Ionien 1: (Frühes Elektron-Priene). (Berlin, 1995).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 4: Mysien-Ionien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 1: Pontus, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Aiolis, Lesbos, Ionia. (Berlin, 1957).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part II: Asia Minor except Karia. (Helsinki, 1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum, Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 7: Odemis Museum, Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins of Ionia, Lydia and etc. (Istanbul, 2012).
Thompson, M. Alexander's Drachm Mints I: Sardes and Miletos. ANSNS 16. (1983).
Thompson, M. "Posthumous Philip II Staters of Asia Minor" in Studia Naster (1982).
Thompson, M., and A.R. Bellinger. Greek Coins in the Yale Collection, IV: A Hoard of Alexander Drachms.. (1955).
Waggoner, N.M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).
Weidauer, L. Problemeder frühen Elektronprägung, Typos I. (Fribourg, 1975).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 21, 2017.
Page created in 1.404 seconds
Ionia