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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Julia Mamaea||View Options:  |  |  | 

Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

Julia Mamaea was the highly intelligent and capable mother of Severus Alexander. After the death of her mother Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea was the power behind the throne and largely responsible for the impressive recovery of the Roman state that took place during her son's rule. Though popular with the population of the empire, the military was deeply offended at being controlled by a woman. In 235 A.D., Julia Mamaea and Severus Alexander were both murdered by mutinous soldiers led by the thug Maximinus I.


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On 11 March 222, Elagabalus was assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard. Their mutilated bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome before being thrown into the Tiber. Severus Alexander succeeded Elagabalus. He was only 13 years old, his mother, Julia Avita Mamaea, governed the Roman Empire with the help of Domitius Ulpianus and a council of 16 senators.
RS91439. Silver denarius, RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, Hunter III 1, SRCV II 8212, VF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.527 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right; reverse IVNO CONSERVATRIX (Juno the protectress), Juno standing half left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock right at feet on left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $144.00 (126.72)


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Vesta was originally a household spirit. Later she was personified as the goddess of the hearth and given the stature of her Greek equivalent, Hestia. In the temple of Vesta, her sacred flame was kept alive by Vestal Virgins. In 394, by order of the Christian emperor Theodosius I in his campaign to eliminate pagan practices in Rome, the fire of Vesta was extinguished.
RS92953. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; Hunter III 7, SRCV II 8217, VF, nice portrait, well centered, porous, edge cracks, weight 2.156 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $60.00 (52.80)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D., Tomis, Moesia Inferior

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Hecate or Hekate is an underworld goddess of archaic origin associated with magic, childbirth, nurturing the young, gates and walls, doorways, crossroads, lunar lore, torches and dogs. During the Hellenistic period, she appeared as a three-faced goddess associated with ghosts, witchcraft, and curses. Today she is popular with modern witches and neo-pagans.
SH56016. Bronze triassarion, AMNG I/II 3296, Varbanov I 5453, aVF, rough surfaces, weight 7.322 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 225o, Tomis (Constanta, Romania) mint, obverse IOYΛIA MAMAIA AYΓ, draped bust right; reverse MHTPO ΠONTOY TOMEΩC, bust of Hekate triformis set on column, her six arms holding her torches of lunar fire, serpents of immortality and knives of midwifery, Γ (mark of value) in left; rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IVLIAMAMAEAAVG
IVLIAMAMAEAAVGMATAVGVSTI
IVLIAMAMAEAAVGVSTA
IVLIAMAMMAEAAVGVST


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 19, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Julia Mamaea