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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ ConstantinopolisView Options:  |  |  |   

Constantinopolis on Ancient Coins

City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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In 332, Constantine I and his son Constantine II, age 16, defeated the Goths in Moesia. The Goths agreed to become Roman allies and to protect the Danube frontier. Only two years later, in 334, the Goths on the Danube frontier prevented an invasion by the Vandals.
RL79123. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 274, 7 (also 1st officina); RIC VII Lyons 241 (R1); LRBC I 185; Bastien XIII 202; SRCV IV 16447; Cohen VII 21, Choice EF, mint luster, very sharp, small areas of porosity, closed flan crack, weight 2.478 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79133. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 246 (R2), LRBC I 191, SRCV V 16449, Cohen VII 21, Hunter V -, Choice EF, full circle centering, centers a little weak, weight 2.342 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79185. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 1 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Trier 530, LRBC I 59, SRCV IV 16444, Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, broad flan, weight 2.277 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 334 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79186. Billon reduced centenionalis, cf. SRCV IV 16444 ff., Cohen VII 22, Choice EF, superb obverse, reverse struck with a worn die, weight 2.715 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 334 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, [...]TRP[...] in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 347 - 348 A.D.

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Of the hundreds of Constantinople commemoratives we have handled in the past 17 years, this is only the second example Forum has handled with this reverse type. Although RIC lists it as only as scarce, it is certainly rare.
RL70891. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea 50 (S), LRBC 961, Voetter -, VF, tight flan, weight 1.533 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 315o, 3rd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLI, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMHΓ in exergue; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79124. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 274, 7 (also 1st officina); RIC VII Lyons 241 (R1); LRBC I 185; Bastien XIII 202; SRCV IV 16447; Cohen VII 21, Choice EF, well centered on a ragged flan, flan crack, areas of light corrosion, weight 2.323 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79126. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 274, 7 (also 1st officina); RIC VII Lyons 241 (R1); LRBC I 185; Bastien XIII 202; SRCV IV 16447; Cohen VII 21, Choice aEF, well centered, areas of weak strike, areas of porosity, weight 2.072 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 347 - 348 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Of the hundreds of Constantinople commemoratives we have handled in the past 17 years, this is only the third example Forum has handled with this reverse type. Although RIC lists it as only as scarce, it is certainly rare.
RL70558. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Heraclea 50, aVF, small and ragged flan, weight 1.481 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 135o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 347 - 348 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLI, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines within wreath, SMHΓ in exergue (mintmark off flan); rare; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79125. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V p. 274, 7 (also 1st officina); RIC VII Lyons 241 (R1); LRBC I 185; Bastien XIII 202; SRCV IV 16447; Cohen VII 21, Choice EF, well centered, a few light marks, spots of light corrosion, Victory's head not fully struck, weight 2.628 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $75.00 SALE PRICE $67.50


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL79134. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 246 (R2), LRBC I 191, SRCV V 16449, Cohen VII 21, Hunter V -, Choice aEF, well centered, reverse struck with a worn die, some light corrosion, tiny edge crack, weight 2.634 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; scarce; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00




  



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Catalog current as of Tuesday, February 28, 2017.
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Constantinopolis