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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ GoatView Options:  |  |  | 

Goats on Ancient Coins

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Cyzicus, Mysia

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This is the finest of only two specimens of this type known to Forum, the other example in SNG Von Aulock. Although we can't quite agree, NAC graded it extremely fine.
RP86162. Bronze AE 26, SNGvA suppl. 7377, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tbingen -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Righetti -, SNG Leypold -, BMC Mysia -, McClean -, Mionnet -, gVF, nice dark green patina, marks, small patina chips, reverse slightly off center, weight 10.976 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 194 - 217 A.D.; obverse IOYΛIA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse KYZIKHNΩN NEOKOPΩN, man sitting right on rocks under a tree, milking goat standing right, goat's head turned back looking left; ex Numismatica Ars Classica auction 100 (29 May 2017), lot 1212; ex Gorny & Mosch sale 237 (7 Mar 2016), 1656; ex Gitbud & Naumann auction 34 (2 Aug 2015), lot 581; extremely rare; $1500.00 (1275.00)


Kelenderis, Cilicia, c. 410 - 375 B.C.

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Kelenderis was a port town, one of the oldest in Cilicia, described in Hellenistic and Roman sources as a small, but strong castle. The rider on the obverse may be Castor, who was not only a horse trainer but also the protector of sailors, an appropriate type for a port town.
GS86211. Silver stater, Casabonne type 4; BMC Cilicia p. 55, 25 & pl. X, 3; cf. SNG BnF 75 (KEΛEN); Celenderis Hoard-; SNG Levante -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aEF, attractive style, centered on a tight flan, die wear and minor die cracks, marks, weight 10.800 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 30o, Celenderis mint, c. 410 - 375 B.C.; obverse young man riding sideways on horse galloping right, preparing to dismount(?), nude, whip in right hand, bridle in left hand; reverse goat crouching left on dotted exergue line, head turned looking back right, KEΛ[E?] above; very rare late issue with rider right and goat left; $1200.00 (1020.00)


Himera, Sicily, 420 - 409 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GB86306. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati I p. 41, 27; SNG Cop 318, SNG Munchen 365; SNG ANS 184 var. (grasshopper control), gVF, dark patina, bumps and scratches, areas of light corrosion, earthen deposits, a little off center, weight 6.039 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 90o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse Pan on a goat prancing right, nude but for chlamys fluttering in the wind behind, preparing to blow on conch in right, thyrsus in left over shoulder, Corinthian helmet (control symbol) below; reverse HIMEPAION, Nike flying left, apluster with dangling fillets in extended right, fold of long chiton in left, six pellets (mark of value) left below arm; $350.00 (297.50)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus won the decisive Battle of Pydna. Perseus of Macedonia was made prisoner and the Third Macedonian War ended. Paullus executed 500 Macedonians, exiled many more to Italy and confiscated their belongings in the name of Rome but according to Plutarch, keeping too much to himself. On the return to Rome in 167 BC, his legions were displeased with their share of the plunder. To keep them happy, Paullus stopped in Epirus, a kingdom suspected of sympathizing with Macedonia; 70 towns were sacked, 150,000 people enslaved, and the region was left bankrupt. Paullus' return to Rome was glorious. With the immense plunder collected in Macedonia and Epirus, he celebrated a spectacular triumph, featuring the captured king of Macedonia himself. The senate awarded him the cognomen Macedonicus.
GB83472. Bronze AE 19, BMC Macedonia p. 48, 40 - 41; AMNG III 51; SNG Cop -; SNG Evelpidis -, Nice VF, attractive style, nice green patina, weight 5.610 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, c. 168 - 149 B.C.; obverse ivy-wreathed head of Dionysos right; reverse goat standing right, AMΦIΠO/ΛEITΩN in two lines, starting above, ending in exergue; scarce; $135.00 (114.75)


Aegira, Achaea, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 369 - 330 B.C.

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The symbol of Aegira is the goat. The city supposedly adopted the symbol and its name after goats saved it from an attack. When the Sikyonian army was about to invade, the inhabitants gathered goats. They tied torches to their horns and at night lit the torches and released the herd. The invaders believed the city was receiving an allied force and turned back. In 370, the inhabitants of Aegae left their city and most settled in Aegira.
GB85811. Bronze AE 14, BCD Peloponnesos 394; BMC Peloponnesus p. 17, 2; Traite 829 & pl. CCXXIII, 1, F, near black patina, scrapes, marks, weight 1.556 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 180o, Aegira mint, c. 369 - 330 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse forepart of goat right, AIΓI around, all within laurel wreath bound above; ex CNG, ex BCD Collection with his round tag; $90.00 (76.50)


Himera, Sicily, c. 420 - 409 B.C.

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In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were put to death by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C.
GB67658. Bronze tetras, Calciati I, p. 42, 31; SNG ANS 1339; Laffaille 149; SNG Cop -, aF, weight 2.200 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 90o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse Pan on a goat prancing right, nude but for chlamys fluttering in the wind behind, preparing to blow on conch in right, thyrsus in left over shoulder, three pellets under goat between legs; reverse [IMEΠAION], Nike flying left, apluster with dangling fillets in extended right, fold of long chiton in left; $60.00 (51.00)


Valerian II, Caesar, Early 256 - 258 A.D.

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The infant Jupiter was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.
RA69007. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 907e, SRCV III 10731, RIC V 3 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 26, F, some mint luster, but struck with worn dies, weight 2.903 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) mint, 1st emission, 257 - 258 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS CAES, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI CRESCENTI, child Jupiter riding right on goat, looking back, raising right hand; $50.00 (42.50)


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

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Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB90741. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 3, SNGvA 1593 var. (no legend), BMC Troas -, SNG Munchen -, VF, green patina, weight 0.880 g, maximum diameter 9.3 mm, die axis 135o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head and neck of goat right, AIΓA upward behind; $36.00 (30.60)


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB86112. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 2; SNGvA 1593 var. (no legend), BMC Troas -, SNG Munchen -, VF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, weight 1.220 g, maximum diameter 9.1 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head and neck of goat right, AIΓAE upward behind; $32.00 (27.20)


Aigai, Aiolis, 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Aegae (or Aigai) means place of goats and was the name of many cities of antiquity. Aigai, Aiolis was also an important sanctuary of Apollo. It was within the Lydian Empire, then the Achaemenid Persian Empire, but had its brightest period under the Attalid dynasty, which ruled from nearby Pergamon in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. It changed hands from Pergamon to the Seleucid Empire, but was recaptured by Attalus I of Pergamon in 218 B.C. In the war between Bithynia and Pergamon, it was destroyed by Prusias II of Bithynia in 156 B.C. After a peace was brokered by the Romans, the city was compensated with 100 talents. In 129 B.C., the Kingdom of Pergamon became part of the Roman Empire. Aigai was destroyed by an earthquake in 17 A.D. and received aid for reconstruction from Tiberius. The ruins are near the village of Yuntdagi Koseler in Manisa Province, Turkey.
GB86099. Bronze AE 9, SNG Cop 2; SNGvA 1593 var. (no legend), BMC Troas -, SNG Munchen -, aVF, green patina, weight .0717 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 0o, Aiolis, Aigai (near Yuntdagi Koseler, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse AIΓAE, head and neck of goat right; a very tiny coin; $14.00 (11.90)







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Goats