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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ ApolloView Options:  |  |  |   

Apollo

God of light, healing, music, poetry, prophecy, archery, and the arts. Symbols include the bow and the lyre. Artemis is his twin sister. Son of Zeus and Leto.


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II of Macedonia, 359 - 336 B.C.

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Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.
SH85135. Gold stater, Le Rider pl. 75, 63 (D31/R52), SNG ANS 251 (also same dies), SNG Cop 523, aEF, fine style, sculptural high relief obverse die, some mint luster, very light marks, weight 8.572 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 315o, Amphipolis mint, 340/336 - 328 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΦIΛIΠΠOY, charioteer driving a racing biga right, wearing a himation, kentron in right hand, reins in his left hand, ivy leaf right below horses; $3500.00 (3115.00)


Myrina, Aeolis, Mid 2nd Century B.C.

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At the time this coin was issued, Myrina was a thriving town popular with tourists and known for its terracotta, glassware, and oysters. Today it is perhaps best known for these beautiful tetradrachms!
GS85155. Silver tetradrachm, stephanophoric; Sacks 30, Hunterian 8, de Luynes 2530, McClean 7946, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Ash -, SNG Mun -, BMC Troas -, aEF, attractive style, broad flan, nice toning, slight double strike on obverse, center not fully struck on reverse, weight 16.320 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 0o, Myrina mint, c. 155 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair falling three long curls over shoulder, ribbons flowing behind; reverse MYPINAIΩN, Apollo Grynios advancing right, patera in right hand, laurel branch with fillets in left hand, omphalos and amphora at feet, three monograms to left, all within laurel wreath; ex Marion Stinton Collection; $800.00 (712.00)


Seleukid Kingdom, Achaios, 220 - 214 B.C.

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Achaios was an uncle of Antiochos III. He proclaimed himself King in Anatolia. After a two-year siege of his capital of Sardes, Lydia, he was captured and beheaded.
GY76100. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber I 956 var. (unlisted control symbol), SNG Spaer 834 var. (same), Newell WSM 1442 var. (same), HGC 9 436 (S-R1), VF, nice green patina, weight 3.314 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 220 - autumn or winter 214 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse eagle standing right, head right, wings closed, wreath in talons, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / AXAIOY in two flanking downward lines, X (control symbol) outer right; unpublished extremely rare variant; $430.00 (382.70)


Persian Achaeminid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Pixodaros, c. 340 - 335 B.C.

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Pixodarus was the youngest of the three sons of Hecatomnus, all of whom successively ruled. To secure the friendship of Philip II, king of Macedonia, Pixodarus offered his eldest daughter in marriage to his Philip's son Arrhidaeus. Arrhidaeus' ambitious younger brother, Alexander (later Alexander the Great) offered himself instead. Pixodarus eagerly agreed but Philip put an end to the scheme. Pixodarus died, apparently a natural death, before Alexander landed in Asia in 334 B.C. and was succeeded by his Persian son-in-law Orontobates.
SH63582. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 2375; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Kayhan 891; SNG Lockett 2913; BMC Caria p. 185, 5 ff.; Weber 6608; SGCV II 4966, aVF, porous, weight 6.541 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mylasa (Milas, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 335 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse ΠIΞΩ∆APOY, Zeus Labraundos standing right, labrys (double-headed axe) over shoulder in right, lotus-tipped scepter vertical in left; $400.00 (356.00)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a citys status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77248. Bronze AE 28, Franke-Nolle, type VI, 857 (Vs.C/Rs.18); cf. SNGvA 3668; SNG Tubingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, VF, tight flan, obscure countermark on obverse, weight 9.924 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY K - ΠOY ΛIK OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, NEOKOPΩN downward in right field, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $300.00 (267.00)


Kyrene, Kyrenaica, North Africa, Ptolemaic Rule, c. 300 - 275 B.C.

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Magas was the stepson of Ptolemy I, the son of Berenice I, and half-brother to Ptolemy II. In 276 B.C., he crowned himself King in Kyrene, married the daughter of Antiochos I and invaded Egypt with his Seleukid allies. The Seleukid army was defeated by Ptolemy II and Magas faced an internal revolt of Libyan nomads. Still, Kyrene remained independent as long as he lived.
GS75115. Silver hemiobol, BMC Cyrenaica pl. XXV, 8 (plates only, missing from text); Mller Afrique -; SNG Cop -; SNG Milan -, gVF, toned, scratches, weight 0.419 g, maximum diameter 9.3 mm, Kyrene mint, Magas, as Ptolemaic governor, c. 300 - 275 B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse star of eight narrow rays around central pellet; ex Roma Numismatics E-sale 17 (April 2015), lot 375; extremely rare; $250.00 (222.50)


Roman Republic, L. Marcius Censorinus, 82 B.C.

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The moneyer selected the design to play on his name, Marsyas sounds like Marcius.

Marsyas found Athena's flute. Inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully. Foolishly he challenged Apollo to a musical contest. Apollo won by singing to the music of his lyre. As a just punishment for his presumption, Apollo flayed Marsyas alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and his skin was hung like a wine bag in the cave out of which that river flows.
SH73011. Silver denarius, SRCV 281, Sydenham 737, Crawford 363/1, RSC I Marcia 24, VF, nice style, attractive iridescent toning, weight 3.650 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse the satyr Marsyas standing left with wine skin over shoulder, LCENSOR before, a column topped with Victory behind; scarce; $245.00 (218.05)


Salapia, Apulia, Italy, c. 225 - 210 B.C.

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Salapia defected to Hannibal in the Second Punic War and he made it his center of operations from c. 214 to 210 B.C. He had an affair with a local woman, branded a prostitute by Pliny. Salapia later made an about-face and returned to the side of Rome. Hannibal tried to reenter the city to take revenge, but failed.

During the Social War, Salapia was burned and almost razed to the ground.

Salapia overlooked a lagoon, which, in the middle of the first century B.C silted-up and transformed into a malaria-generating swamp. With permission from the Roman Senate, the city was moved four miles away, enclosed by walls and connected by a channel to a sea port.

SH72286. Bronze AE 22, HN Italy 692a; SNG Cop 683; SNG ANS 735, VF, green patina, weight 7.588 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 45o, Salapia mint, magistrate Pyllos, c. 225 - 210 B.C.; obverse ΣAΛΛAΠINΩN, laureate head of Apollo right; reverse horse prancing right without rider, trident head right above, ΠYΛΛOY below; very rare; $240.00 (213.60)


Syracuse, Sicily, Roman Rule, c. 212 - 133 B.C.

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Apollo's most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
GI76347. Bronze AE 13, Calciati II p. 419, 212 DS 41; SNG Cop 894; SNG ANS 1079; HGC 2 1523 (R1, Agathokles, c. 310 - 305 B.C.); BMC Sicily -, Nice VF, nice style, attractive green patina, weight 1.544 g, maximum diameter 12.7 mm, die axis 150o, Syracuse mint, Roman rule, c. 212 - 133 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, cornucopia (control symbol) behind; reverse tripod lebes with lion paw feet, three loop handles above the bowl, surmounted by the Pythia's seat, ΣYPAKO/ΣIΩN in two downward lines, starting on right; $225.00 (200.25)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious and cited him as an example of those who by their crimes come to be princes. According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI76940. Bronze AE 13, cf. Calciati II p. 284, 149 R1 6 (controls, Timoleon); SNG ANS 744 (same); SNG Morcom 748 (same); HGC 2 1525 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG Mn -, BMC Sicily -, VF, well centered, green patina, some corrosion, weight 1.877 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 295 - 289 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣION, laureate head of Apollo left, oinochoe behind; reverse dog seated left, looking back right at tail?, Y (control letter) above, A (control letter) in exergue; $225.00 (200.25)




  



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Apollo