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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Provenance ▸ Hoards ▸ Antioch HoardView Options:  |  |  | 

Selection From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus

The hoard consisted of 583 silver and silver-wash antoniniani. While the location of discovery is not known, the contents of the hoard strongly suggest a site near Antioch. The coins date from Elagabalus (218 - 222) to Aurelian (270 - 275). The vast majority came from the period of Gallienus (253 - 268), with slightly over half dating from that emperor's joint reign with his father Valerian. Only two coins, one each of Elagabalus (included in our selection) and Philip II date from before 250; only one coin of Aurelian was minted after 270. The hoard was analyzed and cataloged by Dr. David W. Sorenson. Our coins below are a selection of 191 coins from the hoard. Another selection of 339 coins was offered by Alex Malloy in 1992 in a mail bid sale. Mr. Malloy reports that the biggest buyers of the coins sold in 1992 included the American Numismatic Society, the British Museum, and the Bibliotheque National de France. AHG numbers are those assigned by Dr. Sorenson to the complete hoard of 583 coins.

Click here to see the Malloy catalogue, including analysis of the hoard by Dr. David W. Sorenson and Camden W. Percival, and the coins offered by Mr. Malloy in 1992.

Click here to read "The Age of Gallienus" by Camden W. Percival.


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From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus.AHG Cover
RS39876. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1610e, RIC V 626, RSC IV 28c, SRCV III 10168 var. (obv. legend), AHG 339 (this coin), VF, full circles strike, weight 4.148 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse AEQVITAS AVG (equity of the emperor), Aequitas standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, star left; SOLD


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Virtus is the personification of valor and courage. Valor was, of course, essential for the success of a Roman emperor and Virtus was one of the embodiments of virtues that were part of the Imperial cult. During his joint reign with his father, Gallienus proved his courage in battle; but his failure to liberate his father from Persian captivity was perceived as cowardice and a disgrace to the Emperor and Empire. It was not, however, actually fear that prevented a rescue. While others mourned Valerian's fate, Gallienus rejoiced in his new sovereignty.
RA39814. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1617e, RSC IV 1235a, RIC V S667, SRCV III 10402 var. (obv. legend), AHG 478 (this coin), Choice EF, full circles strike, weight 4.060 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Virtus standing left, helmeted and wearing military garb, resting right hand on shield set on ground, spear with point up in left, star left; from the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus ; SOLD


Saloninus, Summer 260 A.D.

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From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus.

Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. On this coin, the Caesar, Saloninus, the designated successor of the emperor, is identified as the hope for the future of the Roman people.
RS39711. Billon antoninianus, AHG 318 (this coin), Gbl MIR 1696d (Samosata), RIC V 36 (Antioch), RSC IV 95 (Antioch), SRCV III 10775 (uncertain Syrian), Hunter IV - (p. liii), VF, weight 4.085 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Syrian mint, as caesar, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse SALON VALERIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SPES PVBLICA (the hope of the public), Saloninus (on left) and Spes (on right) standing confronted, Spes is raising skirt and presenting flower to prince, Saloninus holds scepter in left; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES




Click here to see the Malloy catalogue, including analysis of the hoard by Dr. David W. Sorenson and Camden W. Percival, and the coins offered by Mr. Malloy in 1992.

Click here to read "The Age of Gallienus" by Camden W. Percival.

Catalog current as of Saturday, November 18, 2017.
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Antioch Hoard