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Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

Tacitus coins for sale in the Forum Ancient Coins shop

Tacitus was an elderly senator in the reign of Aurelian, and after the latter's death was selected as Augustus by the senate. After personally leading his army in a successful campaign against a Gothic invasion, the emperor, aged around 75, died.

Also see: ERIC - TACITUS


References

Abdy, R., E. Besly & F. López-Sánchez. The Gloucester Hoard and other coin hoards of the Britannic Empire. CHRB XIII. (Wetteren, 2010).
Alföldi, A. Siscia, Vorarbeiten zu einem Corpus der in Siscia geprägten Römermünzen IV, Die Prägungen von Tacitus und Florianus. (Budapest, 1940).
Alram, M., R. Denk, & W. Szaivert. Die Münzsammlung des Augustiner-Chorherrenstiftes Klosterneuburg. TNRB 6. (1989).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Bastien, P. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. De la réouverture de l'atelier par Aurélien à la mort de Carin (fin 274 - mi-285). (Wetteren, 1976).
Besly, E. & R. Bland. "The Coleby, near Lincoln, hoard" in CHRB V (1984), pp. 22 - 60.
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Volume 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Crnobrnja, N. The Hoard of Roman Coins from Svetozarevo, Valerian-Diocletian. (Svetozarevo, 1987).
Estiot, S. "Le double trésor de Colonne (Jura), terminus 298 AD" in TM XVII (1998), pp. 107-180.
Estiot, S. "Le Trésor de Maravielle" in TM V (1983), pp. 9 - 115.
Estiot, S. Monnaies de l'Empire Romain Volume XII - 1, D'Aurélien à Florien (270-276 après J.-C.). Bibliotheque nationale de France. (Paris, 2004).
Estiot, S., et al. Ripostiglio della Venèra, Nuovo Catalogo Illustrato, Volume II/2: Tacitus and Florianus. (Verona, 1987).
Estiot, S., M. Amandry & M. Bompaire. "Le Trésor de Sainte-Pallaye (Yonne): 8864 antoniniens de Valérien à Carin" in TM XIV (1993), pp. 39 - 124.
Franke, P. Die antiken Münzen der Sammlung Heynen. (Cologne, 1976).
Kellner, H., L. Zemmer-Plank, & E. Kellner. Ein römischer Münzschatz von Navis-Mühlen im Wipptal. (Innsbruck, 1984).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. V, Part I, Valerian to Florian. (London, 1927).
Mazzini, I. Monete Imperiali Romane. (Milan, 1957-1958).
Monnaies de l'Empire Romain / Roman Imperial Coinage AD 268-276 (RIC V online) - http://www.ric.mom.fr
Milani, L. Il ripositglio della Venèra, Monete romane della seconda meta del terzo secolo. (Rome, 1880).
Nesler, J., D. Hollard & M. Bompaire. "Le trésor de Ciron IV (Indre)" in TM XIX (2000), pp. 129-160.
Postel, R. Katalog der Antiken Münzen in der Hamburger Kunsthalle. (Hamburg, 1976).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. Three, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).


Obverse Legends

CLTACITVSAVG
IMPCAESMCLTACITVSAVG
IMPCCLTACITVSAVG
IMPCLTACITVSAVG
IMPCLTACITVSPFAVG
IMPCMCLTACITVSAVG
IMPCMCLTACITVSINVICTAVG
IMPCMCLTACITVSPAVG
IMPCMCLTACITVSPFAVG
IMPCMCLTACITVSPFAVGVIRTVS
IMPCMCLATACITVSAVG
IMPCMCLATACITVSPAVG
IMPCMTACITVSINVICTVSPFAVG
IMPCTACTIVSAVG
IMPCTACITVSINVICTVSAVG
IMPCTACITVSPAVG
IMPCTACITVSPFINVICTVSAVG
IMPTACITVSINVICTVSAVG
MCLTACITVSPAVG
MCLTACITVSPFAVG


DICTIONARY OF ROMAN COINS




Please add updates or make corrections to the NumisWiki text version as appropriate.
TACITVS (Marcus Claudius), a noble Roman of consular rank, who was not ashamed to

reckon the historian Tacitus among his ancestors; and who, after and interregnum of eight months, during which the empire remained wholly without a head, was, by the united assent of the senate and the army, elected and declared Augustus, A.D. 275, as the successor of the illustrious Aurelian. The elevation of this prince, whose merit and virtues placed him on the throne of the Caesars, at the age, it is said, of 65, was hailed with universal joy by the people of Rome and of the provinces. He was a man of strict integrity, correct in morals, benign and affable, and so addicted to the pursuit of literature, that he never suffered a day to pass without reading or writing something. Temperate in his habits, he appeared, when emperor, in the same unostentatious dress to which he had been accustomed in individual life, nor would he permit his wife to wear either diamonds or pearls. Yet he expended his own immense fortune in contributing to the popular gratification and comfort, causing public baths to be built at his own cost, but commanding them to be shut before night.--Although an involuntary and unwilling occupant of the imperial seat, Tacitus, after having established several laws for the maintenance of good order and the preservation of internal peace, proceeded quickly from Rome to join the army in Thrace. The Scythians, who, having crossed the palus Maeotis, had penetrated into the provinces of Pontus, Cappadocia, and Cilicia, were arrested in their career of devastation and cruelty by the arrival of this brave sovereign, who, in conjunction with his brother Florianus, vanquished those barbarians of the north, and compelled them to take refuge within their own native forests. But, as he was returning from this successful expedition into Europe, he died, according to some writers, at Tarsus, according to others at Tyana, in March, A.D. 276, either of fever, or through treachery of certain military conspirators concerned in the assassination of Aurelian whose death he had avenged by the capital punishment of most of his murderers.---His coins, which are very rare in gold, are still rarer in brass medallions and second brass; but common in small brass, from one of which the engraving above was made: his style is IMP. CL. TACITVS AVG. --- IMP. C. M. CL. TACITVS P.F. AVG., or INVICTVS AVG.

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