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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ MaroneiaView Options:  |  |  |   

Maroneia, Thrace

Maroneia was located on the coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus. It was named after Maron, son of Euanthes, a priest of Apollo, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maron is also called a son of Dionysos. Grapes and vines are symbols of Dionysos or Maron, and advertise the famous wine of Maroneia, which was said to be capable of mixture with twenty times its quantity of water. The autonomous coinage of Maroneia ceased when it fell under the dominion of Philip of Macedon, but the town appears to have remained a place of mintage under Philip, Alexander, Philip Aridaeus, Lysimachus, etc. Not until the second century B.C., when the Romans were supreme in Greece, did Maroneia regain its autonomy. The date of the commencement of the new series of tetradrachms is uncertain, but it is likely that neither Maroneia nor Thasos began to coin again until after the closing of the Macedonian mints for silver in 148 B.C.Maroneia on Wikipedia


Maroneia, Thrace, 386 - 347 B.C.

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SH28913. Silver tetradrachm, Schönert-Geiss 425 (V9/R14); West 92; BMC Thrace p. 126, 25; SNG Lockett 1200 (all same dies), Choice EF, weight 11.359 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 270o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, obverse horse rearing left, trailing rein, MAPΩ below; reverse grape-arbor with four bunches of grapes within square linear frame, EΠI IKE−ΣIO and caduceus around, all within shallow incuse square; toned, beautiful high-relief style, very rare this nice; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, c. 398 - 365 B.C.

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SH19464. Silver triobol, SNG Cop 615, EF, weight 2.755 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, c. 398 - 365 B.C.; obverse forepart of horse left, Π − Λ at sides; reverse vine branch with bunch of grapes, rython lower left, MA lower right, all within dotted square frame; superb horse, probably the finest specimen of the type we have seen; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. In the era of Ancient Greece and Rome, Maroneia was famous for its wine production. The wine was esteemed everywhere; it was said to possess the odor of nectar, and to be capable of mixture with twenty or more times its quantity with water. That the people of Maroneia venerated Dionysus, we learn not just from its famous Dionysian Sanctuary, the foundations of which can still be seen today, but also from the city's coins.
GS73524. Silver tetradrachm, Schönert-Geiss Maroneia 1079 (V33/R97); BMC Thrace p. 128, 56 ff. var. (right monogram); SNG Cop 638 var. (same); SGCV I 1635 var. (monograms), VF, broad flan, light toning, minor flan crack, weight 15.949 g, maximum diameter 36.4 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, ΩΠA monogram lower left, A lower right; SOLD


Lot of 20 Greek Bronze Coins from Maroneia, Thrace, c. 146 - 30 B.C.

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Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maroneia was famous for its wine, which was esteemed everywhere and was said to possess the odor of nectar.
LT77410. Bronze Lot, Lot of 20 bronze coins; cf. Schönert-Geiss Maroneia 1566, BMC Thrace p. 130, 80; SNG Cop 645; Lindgren II 805, aVF - VF, nice coins, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, Roman rule, c. 146 - 30 B.C.; obverse head of young Dionysos right, wearing band across forehead, and ivy wreath; reverse MAPΩNITΩN, Dionysos standing left, nude but for chlamys on left arm, bunch of grapes in right hand, two stalks of narthex in left hand; no tags or flips, actual coins in the photographs, as-is, no returns; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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In the era of Ancient Greece and Rome, Maroneia was famous for its wine production. The wine was esteemed everywhere; it was said to possess the odor of nectar, and to be capable of mixture with twenty or more times its quantity with water. That the people of Maroneia venerated Dionysus, we learn not just from its famous Dionysian Sanctuary, the foundations of which can still be seen today, but also from the city's coins. -- Wikipedia
SH63895. Silver tetradrachm, Schönert-Geiss 995; SNG Delepierre 802; BMC Thrace p. 128, 49 ff. (monogram); SNG Cop 637 - 638 var. (same), VF, flan flaw reverse center, weight 16.430 g, maximum diameter 31.9 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, ΩΠA monogram lower left, TAM monogram lower right; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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This coin came to us identified as a fourree, a silver plated counterfeit with a bronze core. There are a few spots that may expose a copper core, but this may be an official issue with just some coppery areas. The obverse appears to have been struck with the same obverse die as Schönert-Geiss Maroneia 1329 - 1333, none of which are identified as plated counterfeits.
SH68724. Silver tetradrachm, possibly a silver plated fourree; cf. Schönert-Geiss Maroneia 1329 (V101 / -), VF, weight 14.347 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, Π/O monogram lower left, Π/A monogram lower right; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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In the era of Ancient Greece and Rome, Maroneia was famous for its wine production. The wine was esteemed everywhere; it was said to possess the odor of nectar, and to be capable of mixture with twenty or more times its quantity with water. That the people of Maroneia venerated Dionysus, we learn not just from its famous Dionysian Sanctuary, the foundations of which can still be seen today, but also from the city's coins. -- Wikipedia
SH66571. Silver tetradrachm, Schönert-Geiss 1273; SNG Stockholm 769; BMC Thrace p. 128, 49 ff. var. (monogram); SNG Cop 637 ff. var. (same), VF, very broad flan, overstruck, slightly grainy and porous, weight 15.216 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, ΩΠA monogram lower left, TAM monogram lower right; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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SH21588. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Ashmolean 3624, SNG Cop 640, gVF, grainy, weight 14.870 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, ΠO monogram lower left, ΠA monogram lower right; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, Roman Rule, 146 - 45 B.C.

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Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. In the era of Ancient Greece and Rome, Maroneia was famous for its wine production. The wine was esteemed everywhere; it was said to possess the odor of nectar, and to be capable of mixture with twenty or more times its quantity with water. That the people of Maroneia venerated Dionysus, we learn not just from its famous Dionysian Sanctuary, the foundations of which can still be seen today, but also from the city's coins.
SH63684. Silver tetradrachm, Schönert-Geiss 1065 (V 29/R 83); BMC Thrace p. 128, 59 ff. (right monogram); SNG Cop 637 f. var. (same); SNG Delepierre 803 ff. var. (same), VF/F, weight 15.658 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 0o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 146 - 45 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right wreathed in ivy and grapes; reverse ∆IONYΣOY ΣΩTHPOΣ MAPONITΩN, Dionysos standing half left, nude, bunch of grapes in right, two narthex stalks and cloak in left, ΩΠA monogram lower left, TAM monogram lower right; SOLD


Maroneia, Thrace, 377 - 365 B.C.

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Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maroneia was famous for its wine, which was esteemed everywhere and was said to possess the odor of nectar.
SH63501. Silver triobol, Schönert-Geiss 267 ff. (V 49/ -), SNG Fitzwilliam 1728, SNG Cop 617, VF, toned, weight 2.842 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 135o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, 377 - 365 B.C.; obverse Forepart of horse prancing left, M-H-T around; reverse grape bunch on vine with leaves and tendrils, M-A flanking in lower fields, cloverleaf right; all within dotted square within shallow incuse square; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES

Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines, Supplement 2: Thrace. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Psoma S., Ch. Karadima, & D. Terzopoulou. The Coins from Maroneia and the Classical City at Molyvoti. (Athens, 2008).
Schönert-Geiss, E. Die Münzprägung von Maroneia. (Berlin, 1987).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 1, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 1: Italie. Sicile - Thrace. (Athens, 1970).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 2: Sicily - Thrace. (London, 1939).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 2: Sicily-Thrace. (London, 1947).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain V, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Part 4: Paeonia - Thessaly. (London. 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien - Macedonien - Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, SNG Sweden II, The Collection of the Royal Coin Cabinet, National Museum of Monetary History, Part 2: Thrace-Euboia. (Stockholm, 1980).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).
West, A. Fifth and Fourth Century Gold Coins from the Thracian Coast. ANSNNM 40 (1929).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, April 25, 2017.
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Maroneia Greek Coins