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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Hoards| ▸ |Moesia Denarii Hoard||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Finest Roman Denarii From a Hoard of 4000 Coins

FORVM has obtained the finest coins from a large hoard of nearly 4000 Roman denarii, minted from the late Republic to sometime before 107 A.D. These coins were discovered in what was once Moesia Inferior and appear to have been hidden as a result of Trajan's monetary reform or due to Trajan's "Dacian diversion." Towards the end of the first dacian war, Decebalus foreseeing his defeat issued a fierce counter-attack with the help of his Roxolan allies. The troops crossed the frozen Danube and attacked the cities and fortifications in Moesia Inferior which were weakened by the departure of their legions. The plan must have been to force Trajan to retreat a large part of his armies from Dacia, cut his communication lines, or at least gain time. But the Romans were fortunate. The auxiliary troops defeated the invasion, perhaps at the spot were Nikopolis, "the city of the Victory" was founded. Most of the hoard was, as could be expected, well circulated. But, out of the 4000 total coins, there were some in truly spectacular condition. We bought the best. Our expert staff has professionally cleaned these coins using the gentlest methods. Many of the coins below appear nearly as they were struck almost 2000 years ago.


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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"Nerva maintained that he had liberated Rome from the tyranny of Domitian and restored a constitutionally-based regime." -- David Van Meter
SH05247. Silver denarius, unpublished legend error; cf. RIC II 19, RSC II 113, BMCRE III 46, BnF III 32, Hunter I 22, SRCV II -, superb EF, fantastic portrait, sharp, bold, much mint luster, weight 3.33 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICI (sic, error for PVBLICA), Libertas standing half left, pileus in right hand, rod pointing up slightly right in left hand; SOLD


M. Junius Brutus, proconsul & imperator, by Moneyer L. Servius Rufus, 41 B.C.

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M. Junius Brutus (also called Q. Caepio Brutus) is the most famous of Caesars assassins. This type, along with other scarce types from 41 B.C., was the last of the "Republican" coinage. The moneyer was L. Servius Rufus.
SH08484. Silver denarius, SRCV I 503, RSC I Sulpicia 10, Crawford 515/2, Sydenham 1082, aF, weight 3.28 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 41 B.C.; obverse SERVIVS RVFVS, bare head of Brutus right; reverse the Dioscuri standing facing, each holding spear; very rare; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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In late October 97 A.D., Nerva adopted Trajan as son and heir of the Empire. It was the best option as Nerva was facing increasing military opposition. The previous emperor Domitian was a friend of the army and gave no consideration to the Senate, while the new emperor was a very old senator. Trajan was perhaps the most popular and successful general of the time. As recognition of his work in Germany he was named Germanicus and the tile passed onto Nerva as well. Trajan received a Consulship and Nerva announced his fourth for the following year, hence the COS III DESIGN IIII legend. This very rare type is difficult to obtain and even harder in this wonderful grade. Struck at a moment which shaped the destiny of the empire for the next century, a period viewed as a Golden Age.
SH01654. Silver denarius, RIC II 41, RSC II 84, lustrous EF, weight 3.37 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 27 Oct - 31 Dec 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG GERM P M TR P II, laureate head right; reverse IMP II COS III DESIGN IIII P P, sacrificial implements; very rare; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
SH08110. Silver denarius, RIC II 13, RSC II 6, BnF III 13, BMCRE III 24, Hunter I 9, SRCV II -, Choice EF, exceptional stern portrait, mint luster, weight 3.72 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse AEQVITAS AVGVST (fairness of the emperor), Aequitas standing half left, head left, wearing stephane, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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The Victory on the reverse duplicates a Victory on Trajan's Column. This Victory separates the scenes of the first Dacian war from the scenes of the second. Click here to see the |Victory| on the column.
SH11454. Silver denarius, RIC II 66, RSC II 247, BMCRE III 112, SRCV II 3144 variety, aUNC, superb mint luster, sharp, light toning, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 101 - 102 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P COS IIII P P, Victory inscribing shield set on base, foot on helmet; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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The pulvinar (plural pulvinaria) was a special couch used for displaying images of the gods, that they might receive offerings at ceremonies such as the lectisternium or supplicatio. In the famous lectisternium of 217 B.C., on orders of the Sibylline books, six pulvinaria were arranged, each for a divine male-female pair. By extension, pulvinar can also mean the shrine or platform housing several of these couches and their images. At the Circus Maximus, the couches and images of the gods were placed on an elevated pulvinar to "watch" the games.
SH01667. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 119; RSC II 316; BMCRE II 51; BnF III 43, SRCV I 2513, superb EF, light toning, mint luster, weight 3.64 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 80 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate bearded head right; reverse TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, horizontal winged fulmen (thunderbolt) on draped pulvinar (empty throne) of Jupiter; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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On 7th June 1974, during excavations of Pompeii's "House of the Gold Bracelet" an example of this type was discovered among 180 silver and 40 gold coins with the bodies of a group of victims. The traditional date given for the eruption of Vesuvius is 24 August 79 A.D. This traditional date is not, however, based on solid evidence. Contemporary sources and letters indicate that Titus did not receive his 15th Imperial acclamatio until September 79 A.D. The excavation of this coin type at Pompeii indicates the eruption did not occur until later in the fall.
RS06004. Silver denarius, RIC II 37, RSC II 294, BMCRE II 35. BnF III 32, SRCV I 2510, Choice EF, weight 3.38 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Sep - 31 Dec 79 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P (tribunitian power 9 times, imperator 15 times, consul 7 times, father of the country), Capricorn left, globe below; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"
SH01416. Silver denarius, RIC II 34, RSC II 51, BMCRE III 56, BnF III 41, SRCV II 3023, Hunter I -, EF, weight 3.54 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 18 Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR POT II, laureate head right; reverse COS III PATER PATRIAE, implements of the augurate and pontificate: simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), ewer (jug) and lituus (augural wand); SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
SH01666. Silver denarius, RIC II 16, RSC II 66, BMCRE III 37, EF, weight 3.32 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 1 Jan - 18 Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNA AVGVST (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; toned; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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A gilded 2nd century B.C. slightly over-lifesize bronze statue, Hercules of the Forum Boarium, has Hercules in a similar pose. This statue is probably the one mentioned by Pliny, which originally stood in the Temple of Hercules Victor, by the Tiber. It lacks the lion skin. Perhaps a actual lion skin was once draped on it. The sculpture is now in the Musei Capitolini, Rome. Another similar sculpture, from the 2nd Century A.D., the Hercules of the Theatre of Pompey, was discovered in 1864, carefully buried under protective tiles. It was incised FCS (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that it had been struck by lightning, and had been carefully interred on the spot. The figure lightly supports himself on his grounded vertical club, the skin of the Nemean Lion is draped over his left forearm. This sculpture is now in the round room area of Museo Pio-Clementino, in the Vatican.Hercules_Sculptures
SH01668. Silver denarius, Woytek 100b, RSC II 236, RIC II 50 var. (aegis), BnF IV 110 var. (same), Strack I 40 var. (same), BMCRE III 91 var. (same), SRCV II -, Mint State, amazing proof-like luster, light die break at 6 o'clock on reverse, weight 3.42 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 101 - Oct 102 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES NERVA TRAIAN AVG GERM, laureate bust right, aegis on far shoulder; reverse P M TR P COS IIII P P, statue of Hercules standing facing on low base, nude except for lion skin draped over shoulders and left arm, club downward in right hand, apples of Hesperides in his left hand; among the most lustrous coins Forum has handled; SOLD




  




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