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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |Germanic Tribes||View Options:  |  |  |   

Germanic Tribes - Vandals, Goths, Gepids, Lombards, and Other Barbarian Invaders

Non-Imperial Coinages in Africa, "Domino Nostro," c. 5th Century A.D.

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This type has been attributed to the time of Johannes and Boniface in Carthage 423 - 425 A.D., but strong evidence is lacking. We may more safely assume the series is later and copying official issues. The star is probably a crude Christogram or degenerated cross.
ME26375. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 3815, F, weight 0.511 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, obverse DOMINIS NOSTRIS, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse star in wreath; very rare; SOLD


Kingdom of Gepidia, c. 493 - 518 A.D., In the Name of Anastasius

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Long attributed to the Ostrogoths, Metlich corrected attribution of this type to Gepidia. The Gepids were an East Germanic tribe, closely related to the Goths, first recorded in the 6th-century as having been allied with Goths invading Dacia in c. 260. In the 4th century, they were under the hegemony of the Hunnic Empire. Under King Ardaric, the Gepids united with other Germanic tribes and defeated the Huns at the Battle of Nedao in 454. The Gepids then founded the Kingdom of Gepidia, which reached its zenith of power after 537, settling around Singidunum (today's Belgrade). For a short time, Sirmium (today's Sremska Mitrovica) was the center of the Gepid State. In 552 the Gepids suffered a disastrous defeat to Alboin, king of the Lombards, after which Alboin had a drinking cup made from the skull of the Gepid King Cunimund. Remnants of the Gepids were conquered by the Avars later in the 6th century. Erythrai_amphitheater
BZ86482. Silver quarter siliqua, Hahn MIB I 46 (Theoderic), Kraus 63 - 64 (Theoderic), BMC Vandals ?, MEC I ?, Metlich ?, VF, well centered and struck on a broad flan, toned, light marks, small edge crack, weight 0.885 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 180o, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, c. 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse D N ANASTASIVS P P AVC, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Anastasius (Byzantine Emperor, 11 Apr 491 - 1 Jul 518) right; reverse INVIT-A ROMA D M, (monogram of Ostrogothic King Theoderic, 454 - 30 Aug 526), cross above and star below, both dividing legend; SOLD


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, 427 - 534 A.D.

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The 4 nummi was 1/1000 of a gold tremisis.

In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general Aëtius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME89613. Bronze 4 nummi, MEC I 51 - 56 (Carthage semi-autonomous municipal coinage); BMC Vandals p. 7, 12 - 14 (Hunneric, 477 - 484 A.D.); MIB I 20 (Gelimer, 530 - 533 A.D.), VF, highlighting red earthen deposits, reverse slightly off center, weight 1.161 g, maximum diameter 11.2 mm, die axis 315o, Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 480 - 533 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding palm frond; reverse N / IIII (mark of value) in two lines across field; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 989 (notes export permit was approved by the Israel Antiquities Authority); rare; SOLD


Germanic Tribes, Horse Head Swastika Plate Fibulae, c. 174 - 300 A.D.

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This type is found in the former Eastern Empire, including Pannonia, Moesia, Dacia and in Germanic lands. An especially high concentration have been found in northern Serbia in and around Novi Banovci, Roman Burgenae. It is considered a Germanic type. The horse head swastika is believed to be a sun symbol.
AS71473. Bojovic XXVII; Genceva 32b; Matouschek-Novak 1981/82, Taf. 14, 53; Janovic 60; Riha -; Feugère-; 36.3 mm, 10.6g, Choice, green patina, pin missing, a clockwise swastika shaped brooch with each arm ending with a horse's head, jaw hing pin connection; ON LAYAWAY


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, c. 429 - 534 A.D., Imitative of Valentinian III

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In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general Aëtius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME79994. Bronze nummus, cf. BMC Vandals p. 27, 80 & pl. iii, 38, VF, crowded flan typical for the type, weight 1.460 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, North African mint, c. 429 - 534 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Valentinian III right, blundered legend; reverse camp gate with two turrets, star between turrets, blundered legend; ex Forum (2016); rare; SOLD


Ostrogothic Kingdom, City of Rome, Municipal Coinage, 493 - 518 A.D.

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This City of Rome municipal coinage 40 nummi was struck during the reign of Theoderic the Great, king of the Ostrogoths (475 - 526). Theoderic controlled an empire stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Adriatic Sea. He kept good relations between Ostrogoths and Romans, maintained a Roman legal administration and oversaw a flourishing scholarly culture and the largest building program in Italy in 100 years. The Palace of Domitian on the Palatine Hill was reconstructed, the city walls were rebuilt, and the Senate's Curia, the Theater of Pompey, the city aqueducts, sewers and a granary were refurbished and repaired.
ME89614. Bronze 40 nummi, MEC I 109, cf. Metlich COI 76a (AE30), Hahn MIB I Ostgoten 74a (same); BMC Vandals p. 102, 6 (same), VF, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, struck on tight flan, weight 4.047 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse INVICTA ROMA (invincible Rome), helmeted and draped bust of Roma right; reverse eagle standing left, head turned back looking right, XL (mark of value, upward L reverse) lower left field, uncertain Greek letter (officina number) between pellets in exergue; ex Roman Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 990; ex North American private collection; very rare; SOLD


Ostrogoths, Athalaric, 31 August 526 - 2 October 534, In the Name of Byzantine Empire, Justinian I

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BZ40599. Bronze AE 4, BMC Vandals p. 67, 52, gF, weight 1.048 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, obverse JVST-INIANII (blundered), diademed and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right; reverse monogram of Athalaric in wreath; SOLD


Vandals, Anonymous, Early 5th Century A.D.

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ME50449. Bronze nummus, BMC Vandals p. 38, 165 - 172; MEC I 33, gVF, weight 0.572 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage(?) mint, 5th century A.D.; obverse diademed and draped bust right; reverse star within wreath; excellent for the type; rare; SOLD


Ostrogoth Kingdom in Italy, Theoderic the Great, 493 - 526 A.D.

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Theoderic the Great was king of the Ostrogoths, ruler of Italy, regent of the Visigoths, and a patricius of the Roman Empire. As ruler of the combined Gothic realms, Theoderic controlled an empire stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Adriatic Sea.Map526
ME88952. Bronze decanummium, Metlich COI 77; Hahn MIB I pl. 40, 76; BMC 34, 35, Kraus 1, Tolstoi 644, Ratto 2377 (rare), MEC I -, VF, dark brown patina, rough, small flan, weight 1.995 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse FELIX RAVENNA, crowned bust of Ravenna right; reverse eagle standing left on branch, head left, wings open, star left and star right, X (mark of value) in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 238 (11 Aug 2010), lot 649; rare; SOLD


Ostroghoths, 536 - 554 A.D.., Municipal Issue of Ravenna

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Belisarius first took Ravenna in 539 but after his recall the Goths reconquered Italy. The Byzantines practically annihilated the Ostrogoths in a battle near Mount Vesuvius in 553 and the last fortress fell in 555. Survivors mingled with other peoples and nations; some were Romanized in Italy and others wandered north among the Germanic tribes. Italy became a Byzantine province. The Ostrogoths disappeared.
SH11311. Bronze decanummium, Hahn MIB I 72b; MEC I 150, VF, weight 2.008 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, 536 - 554 A.D.; obverse FELIX R-AVENNA, Crowned and draped bust of Ravenna; reverse monogram of Ravenna within wreath, cross above, X below; rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Arslan, M. Le monete di ostrogoti, longobardi e vandalli. Catalogo delle Civiche Raccolte Numismatiche di Milano. (Milan, 1978).
Bernareggi, E. Il sistema economico e la monetazione dei Longobardi nell'Italia superior. (Milano, 1960).
Boutin, S. Monnaies des Empires de Byzance - Collection of N.K. (Maastricht, 1983).
Corpus Nummorum Italicorum. (Rome, 1910-1943).
Demo, Z. Ostrogothic coinage from collections in Croatia, Slovenia and Bosnia & Herzegovina. (Ljubljana, 1994).
Depeyrot, G. Les émissions monétaires d'Arles (4th -5th Siècles). (Wetteren, 1996).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or. (Wetteren, 1995-1996).
Depeyrot, G. "Les solidi gaulois de Valentinian III" in SNR 65 (1986).
Grierson, P. and M. Blackburn. Medieval European Coinage, Volume 1: The Early Middle Ages (5th - 10th Centuries). (Cambridge, 2007).
Hahn, W. "Das Wertsystem der vandalischen Kupfermünzen" in JNG XXXVI (1986).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Heiss, A. Description généerale des monnaies des roi wisigothes d'Espagne. (Paris, 1872).
Kent, J. "The coinage of Theodoric in the names of Anastasius and Justin I" in Essays Baldwin.
Kent, J. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Volume X, The Divided Empire and the Fall of the Western Parts, AD 395 - 491. (London, 1994).
King, C. "Fifth Century Silver Coinage in the Western Roman Empire (401-413)" in Mélanges Bastien.
Kraus, F. Die Münzen Odovacars und des Ostgotenreiches in Italien. (Riechmann, 1928).
Lacam, G. La fin de L'Empire Romain et le monnayage or en Italie. (Lucern, 1983).
Lianta, E. Late Byzantine Coins, 1204 - 1453, in the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. (London, 2009).
Metlich, M. The Coinage of Ostrogothic Italy. (London, 2004).
Miles, G. The Coinage of the Visigoths of Spain. (New York, 1952).
Morrisson, C. & J. Schwartz. "Vandal Silver Coinage in the Name of Honorius" in MN 27 (1982).
Oddy, W. "Analysis of the Gold Coinage of Beneventum" in NC 1974.
Ranieri, E. La monetazione di Ravenna antica dal V all' VIII secolo: impero romano e bizantino, regno ostrogoto e langobardo. (Bologna, 2006).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines à l'époque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Reinhart, W. "Die Münzen des tolosanischen Reiches der Westgoten" in Deutsches Jahrbuch für Numismatik 1938.
Retowski, O. Die Münzen der Komnenen von Trapezunt. (Braunschweig, 1974).
Sambon, A. Les monnaies antiques de l'Italie. (Paris, 1903).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1914).
Ulrich-Bansa, O. Moneta Mediolanensis (352-498). (Venice, 1949).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths, Lombards and Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea, and Trebizond in the British Museum. (London, 1911).

Catalog current as of Thursday, November 21, 2019.
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Germanic Tribes