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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Under $50View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

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Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $25.00 (22.25)


Ptolemaic Kyrenaica, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), 246 - 116 B.C.

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Alexander the Great received tribute from the cities of Kyrenaica after he took Egypt. Kyrenaica was annexed by Ptolemy I Soter. It briefly gained independence under Magas of Cyrene, stepson of Ptolemy I, but was reabsorbed into the Ptolemaic empire after his death. It was separated from the main kingdom by Ptolemy VIII and given to his son Ptolemy Apion, who, dying without heirs in 96 B.C., bequeathed it to the Roman Republic.
GP65950. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 874 (Ptolemy II, 1 specimen), cf. SNG Cop 445 (Ptolemy III), Weiser 105 (Ptolemy V), Noeske 130 (Ptolemy III), SNG Milan 484 (uncertain date), VF, weight 0.881 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene mint, 246 - 116 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse head of Libya right, wearing tainia, cornucopia below chin; $80.00 (71.20)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA47000. Silvered antoninianus, MER-RIC 3257, RIC V 44, Bastien IX 30, BnF XII 1406, Venra 1139 - 1143, VF, well centered, much silvering, weight 3.904 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, issue 1, Nov - Dec 275 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX PVBLICA, Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, no mark; scarce; $45.00 (40.05)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Probus defeated the usurpers, Proculus at Lugdunum (Lyon), Bonosus at Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne), and Julius Saturninus at Apamea, Syria.
RA46840. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 913, gVF, near full silvering, weight 3.465 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 280 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), emperor riding left, raising hand, captive at foot before horse, V below, XXI M(oneta) C(yzicus) in exergue; $45.00 (40.05)


Thracian Tribes, c. 146 - 30 B.C., Imitative of Maroneia, Thrace

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This is the only example of this type with a blundered ethnic known to Forum. We believe it much more likely a Thracian tribal imitative than a Maroneia mint error.
BB54594. Bronze AE 18, cf. Schnert-Geiss Maroneia 1566, BMC Thrace p. 130, 80; SNG Cop 645; Lindgren II 805 (blundered ethnic), VF, crude, weight 6.585 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thracian tribal mint, c. 146 - 30 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of young Dionysos right; reverse Dionysos standing left, grapes in right, narthex in left, blundered inscription downward on right (normally MAPΩNITΩN, appears as NEOΣ?); $45.00 (40.05)


Kolophon, Ionia, c. 360 - 294 B.C.

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After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered.
GB59682. Bronze dichalkon, Milne Kolophon 112, Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 70, 5, BMC Ionia p. 38, 23 ff. var. (various magistrates), SNG Cop 149 ff. var. (same), aVF, weight 2.045 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 360 - 294 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of horse right, ΘPAΣYKΛHΣ (magistrate) left, KO below; $45.00 (40.05)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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The Romans, whose fondness for new gods increased with the influence of their foreign conquests, introduced the worship of Serapis within the walls of their city; not, however, without some opposition and resistance from the Senate. Through the influence of P. Victor an altar was erected to Serapis in the Circus Flaminii, and it quickly assumed the form of a superb temple which, after its Alexandrine prototype, was called the Serapeon. The principal Italian cities, never far behind Rome, soon imitated her example, and it was not long before the worship of Serapis was extended from Italy by the different colonies sent from that country into Asia Minor.
RP59690. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3842 - 3843 var. (obv. legend), BMC Thrace p. 120, 27 var. (same), SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 9.782 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Serapis standing half left, raising right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand; rare variety; $45.00 (40.05)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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In 292, the Roman general Achilleus was proclaimed emperor in Alexandria. For two years he ruled over Egypt, but in 294 his rebellion was crushed by Emperor Diocletian.
RS60443. Billon antoninianus, Bastien 435; RIC V, part 2, 34; cf. Hunter IV 35 (1st officina); SRCV IV 12658 var. (obv. legend), EF, near full silvering, uneven strike, weight 2.795 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 292 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI AVGG, Jupiter seated left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter behind in left, uncertain officina letter in exergue; $45.00 (40.05)


Kierion, Thessaly, Greece, c. 400 - 344 B.C.

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Kierion was originally named Arne for the Nymph on the reverse of this coin. Most references, including BCD, identify the male god on the obverse as Zeus. Rogers and SNG Cop say Poseidon. Since, according to one myth, Arne became pregnant by Poseidon and bore the twins Aiolos and Boiotos, we think Poseidon is more likely.
BB62454. Bronze chalkous, cf. BCD Thessaly II 105.1; Rogers 173; SNG Cop 35; BMC Thessaly p. 15, 1; SNG Evelpidis 1516; HGC 4 679 (S), Fair, weight 2.492 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 255o, Kierion mint, c. 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right with a short neatly trimmed beard and fillet binding his hair; reverse KIEPIEIΩN, the nymph Arne kneeling right on right knee, looking left, her torso bare, leaning on right hand on the ground, tossing astragaloi with left; scarce; $45.00 (40.05)


Pannonian Celts, Syrmia Region, Kugelwange (Ball Cheek) Type, c. 2nd Century B.C.

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Syrmia is a fertile region of the Pannonian Plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. Today, it is divided between Serbia in the east and Croatia in the west.
CE68492. Bronze tetradrachm, cf. Lanz 471; Gbl OTA 193/14; CCCBM I S133; Pink 199, Forrer Keltische pl. XXXII, 279; derived from the Macedonian Kingdom tetradrachms of Philip II, aVF, weight 8.947 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Syrmia mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse devolved laureate head of Zeus right, hair in arcs on both sides of central point, broad laurel wreath, ball cheek; reverse devolved horse trotting left; $45.00 (40.05)




  



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Under $50