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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |In This Sign...||View Options:  |  |  |   

In This Sign You Will Be The Victor

The Roman, Byzantine, crusader and other coins below carry the symbols of Christ. In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Chi Rho Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO ERIS, meaning "In this sign you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions' standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor. Click here to read Christian Themes in |Byzantine| Coinage by Zach Margulies.


Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
SH53618. Gold solidus, RIC X Arcadius 38 (R2); Depeyrot p. 225, 44/2; DOCLR 756; SRCV V 20900, gVF, weight 4.379 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 397 - 402 A.D.; obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, diademed, cuirassed, cross on breast plate, spear in right over right shoulder behind head, shield decorated with horseman on left arm; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG (harmony between the two emperors), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, holding long scepter and Victory on globe, foot on prow, COMOB in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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Marcian indirectly saved Rome from Attila the Hun. In 452, Attila captured and ransacked Aquileia, Milan, and other cities in Northern Italy. It seemed Attila would soon attack Rome itself, whose walls were weaker than some cities Attila had already captured. Meanwhile, however, Marcian's Eastern Roman forces had taken the offensive across the Danube, attacking the breadbasket of the Hunnic Empire. The loss of food supply from Attila's own land, and a famine and plague in Italy, depleted Attila's forces, allowing the Western Roman Empire to bribe him into returning to his homeland. Back home, Attila threatened to invade the Eastern Empire and enslave the entirety of it. Marcian and Aspar ignored his threats. The Eastern Empire had already paid Attila about six tons of gold, yet he still threatened them. They reasoned that gold would be better spent building up armies. Attila's attack never came, as he died unexpectedly in 453, either from hemorrhaging or alcoholic suffocation, after celebrating a marriage to one of his many wives. Attila's tribal confederation empire fell apart within a year after his death. Marcian settled numerous tribes, formerly under Attila, within Eastern Roman lands as foederati (subject tribes which gave military service in exchange for various benefits). Map 450 A.D.
SH37574. Gold solidus, DOCLR 481 (also 7th officina), Ratto 217, RIC X Marcian 510, Hahn MIB 5, SRCV V 21379, EF, weight 4.485 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, 7th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 450 A.D.; obverse D N MARCIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding spear and shield decorated with horseman spearing a fallen enemy; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG Z (victory of the three emperors, 7th officina), Victory standing left holding a long jeweled cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

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Struck at Ravenna where the late western emperors' made their capital.
SH28125. Gold solidus, RIC X Valentinian III 2018, Cohen VIII 19, SRCV 4310, EF, weight 4.425 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, Ravenna mint, c. 430 - 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Valentinian standing facing, foot on the head of a man-faced snake with closed coil, holding long cross and Victory on globe, R left, V right, COMOB in exergue; slightly double-struck, a couple very small light scratches; SOLD


Zeno, 18 January - 17 November 474 and August 476 - 11 April 491 A.D.

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Zeno the Isaurian, was originally named Tarasis Kodisa Rousombladadiotes. The Isaurians were a people who lived inland from the Mediterranean coast of Anatolia, in the core of the Taurus Mountains. They were looked upon as barbarians by the Romans, however, being Orthodox Christians rather than Arians, as the Goths and other Germanic tribes were, they were not formally barred from the throne. Zeno married Ariadne, daughter of Leo I and Verina. To make himself more acceptable to the Roman hierarchy and the population of Constantinople, Tarasis adopted the Greek name of Zeno and used it for the rest of his life.
SH26063. Gold solidus, RIC X 930 (pearl diadem, no jewel), DOCLR 629 var. (4th officina), Depeyrot 108/1, SRCV V 21514, Choice EF, bold strike with sharp dies and nice centering - very attractive coin!, weight 4.307 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, second reign; obverse D N ZENO PERP AVG, helmeted bust facing, pearl diademed, cuirassed, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm decorated with horseman riding down enemy; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG S (victory of the three emperors, 6th officina), Victory standing left, long jeweled cross in right, star right, CONOB in exergue; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Leontius, 695 - 698 A.D.

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Leontius' success as a general forced the Arab Caliph Abd al-Malik to make concessions and pay tribute to Emperor Justinian II; but when war was renewed, Leontius was defeated. Furious over the loss, Justinian imprisoned him for two years. When he was freed, Leontius and his former prison comrades organized a revolt, and he took the throne. Justinian was deposed, his nose and tongue were slit and he was exiled to a monastery. After the Arabs took Carthage, the fleet Leontius sent to retake the city failed. Rather than report defeat to the emperor, the army overthrew their admiral and named Apsimar, a Germanic sailor, as their leader. Apsimar changed his name to Tiberius, returned to Constantinople, seized the thrown, cut off Leontius' nose and ears and exiled him to a monastery. In 705, Justinian II returned to Constantinople with an army of Bulgars and Slavs. Both Leontius and Tiberius were dragged through the streets in chains and beheaded.
SH89538. Gold solidus, DOC II part 2, 1b, Morrisson BnF 16/Cp/AV/02, SBCV 1330, Hahn MIB III 1, Sommer 15.1, Wroth BMC -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, EF, mint luster, flow lines, uneven strike with part of obverse legend and mintmark weak, obverse off center, die wear, tight flan, weight 4.319 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 695 - 698 A.D.; obverse D LEO-N PE AV, bearded facing bust, wearing loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse VICTORIA AVSY S, cross potent set on three step, CONOB in exergue; from the Robert Watcher Collection; rare; ON LAYAWAY


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

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SH26056. Gold solidus, RIC X Valentinian III 2018, Cohen VIII 19, SRCV 4310, EF, weight 4.408 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 195o, Ravenna mint, c. 430 - 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Valentinian standing facing, foot on the head of a man-faced snake with closed coil, holding long cross and Victory on globe, R left, V right, COMOB in exergue; SOLD


Crusaders, Kingdom of Cyprus, John II, 1432 - 1458

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer for 40 years and co-author of Coins of the Crusader States. Ex Sotheby's auction 10-14-99. Ex John J. Slocum Collection. Mr. Slocum was in the American diplomatic service in the Holy Land where he collected rare and unique coins in the early 1960's.
CR31991. Billon gros, Malloy Crusaders, type 10, 136 var. (no depression at center, legend ends PR), aEF, weight 3.885 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 225o, obverse + IOAn REX D, king seated on curule chair, foreparts of lions at sides, cloak open, cruciform scepter in right, orb in left, cauldron left, triple pellet after X, double pellet after D; reverse + IERUSAIm E D ChIPRE, Jerusalem cross, small depression at center, triple pellet legend breaks; SOLD


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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The Column of Marcian was dedicated to Marcian, built by the praefectus urbi Tatianus, sometime between 450 and 452. It still stands in modern Istanbul, though the statue of Marcian which originally topped it has been lost. Marcian also had a statue in the Forum of Arcadius, which contained the statues of several of Arcadius' successors.Column of Marcian
SH28069. Gold solidus, RIC X Marcian 509, RIC X Marcian 509, DOCLR 476, SRCV V 21379, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, Choice aEF, attractive centering, scratch in obverse right field, weight 4.482 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 25 Aug - Dec 450 A.D.; obverse D N MARCIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding spear and shield decorated with horseman spearing a fallen enemy; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG (victory of the three emperors, no officina number), Victory standing left holding a long jeweled cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Basil II Bulgaroktonos and Constantine VIII, 10 January 976 - 15 December 1025 A.D.

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The manus Dei (the hand of God) is above Basil's head.
SH17756. Gold histamenon nomisma, SBCV 1800; DOC III part 2, 6a, Choice gVF, weight 4.296 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, obverse IhS XPS REX REGNANTIhM, bust of Christ facing wearing nimbus cruciger with crescents in upper quarters, pallium and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, Gospels in left hand, triple border; reverse bASIL C CONSTANT, facing crowned busts of Basil (on left) wearing square pattern loros, manus Dei above, and Constantine wearing jeweled chlamys, both hold long plain cross, triple border; from the Woolslayer Collection; SOLD


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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In 450, Vardan II Mamikonian, who was leading a revolt against the Sassanian Empire, sent an embassy to Theodosius to ask for assistance. This was favored by Theodosius but these plans were dropped by Marcian. Later, c. 456, Marcian risked the anger of the Sassanids to strike against Gubazes I, the king of Lazica, which was nominally a vassal Roman state, who was attempting to form an alliance with the Sassanians to break free of Roman control. Marcian launched a military campaign against him in 456, forcing him to abdicate.
SH14768. Gold solidus, DOCLR 481 (also 7th officina), Ratto 217, RIC X Marcian 510, Hahn MIB 5, SRCV V 21379, Choice EF, weight 4.491 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, 7th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 450 A.D.; obverse D N MARCIA-NVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding spear and shield, diadem with large jewel and three pearls, shield decorated with horseman spearing a fallen enemy; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG Z (victory of the three emperors, 7th officina), Victory standing left holding a long jeweled cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD




  




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In This Sign... Biblical Coins