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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Recovery of the Empire| ▸ |Numerian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

Numerian was the son of Carus and was raised to the rank of Caesar after his father's accession. During the campaign against the Persians he was declared co-emperor by his father, and after Carus' death led the Roman army back into Roman territory. Near Heraclea, Numerian was discovered murdered in his litter.


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA58676. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 395, Cohen 47, Bastien IX 557 (6 examples cited), gVF, bold portrait, some porosity, weight 3.392 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, emission 6, Aug 283 - start 284 A.D.; obverse IMP NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust left spear in right over shoulder, shield decorated with Medusa head in left; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand,B left; rare; SOLD


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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RA46797. Billon antoninianus, Bastien IX 561, RIC V-2 388, Cohen VI 22, VF, weight 3.829 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 225o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, Aug 283 - early 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, spear over shoulder in left; reverse MARS VICTOR (Mars the Victor), Mars advancing right, nude but for cloak flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, C in right field; rare; SOLD


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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In 283, Carus left Carinus in charge of the West and moved with Numerian and his praetorian prefect Arrius Aper to the East to wage war against the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids had been embroiled in a succession dispute since the death of Shapur and were in no position to oppose Carus' advance. According to Zonaras, Eutropius, and Festus, Carus won a major victory against the Persians, taking Seleucia and the Sassanid capital of Ctesiphon (near modern Al-Mada'in, Iraq), cities on opposite banks of the Tigris. In celebration, Numerian, Carus, and Carinus all took the title Persici maximi.
RA85606. Billon antoninianus, Venèra IV 1927 (12 ex.); RIC V-2 361; Cohen VI 76; Hunter IV 2 var. (KA∆); SRCV III -, Choice VF, excellent portrait, attractive surfaces, light marks, light encrustations, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT (to the Prince of Youth), Numerian standing left, baton pointed downward in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, ∆KA in exergue; SOLD


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In 283, Carus left Carinus in charge of the West and moved with Numerian and his praetorian prefect Arrius Aper to the East to wage war against the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids had been embroiled in a succession dispute since the death of Shapur and were in no position to oppose Carus' advance. According to Zonaras, Eutropius, and Festus, Carus won a major victory against the Persians, taking Seleucia and the Sassanid capital of Ctesiphon (near modern Al-Mada'in, Iraq), cities on opposite banks of the Tigris. In celebration, Numerian, Carus, and Carinus all took the title Persici maximi.
RA04153. Billon antoninianus, Venèra IV 2098 (25 ex.); Hunter IV 1; RIC V-2 363; Cohen VI 72; cf. SRCV III 12217 (obv. legend), Choice EF, bold and sharp, weight 3.97 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT (to the Prince of Youth), Numerian standing slightly left, bare head left, wearing military garb, globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, KAς in exergue; SOLD


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In 283, Carus left Carinus in charge of the West and moved with Numerian and his praetorian prefect Arrius Aper to the East to wage war against the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids had been embroiled in a succession dispute since the death of Shapur and were in no position to oppose Carus' advance. According to Zonaras, Eutropius, and Festus, Carus won a major victory against the Persians, taking Seleucia and the Sassanid capital of Ctesiphon (near modern Al-Mada'in, Iraq), cities on opposite banks of the Tigris. In celebration, Numerian, Carus, and Carinus all took the title Persici maximi.
RA12511. Billon antoninianus, Venèra IV 2098 (25 ex.); Hunter IV 1; RIC V-2 363; Cohen VI 72; cf. SRCV III 12217 (obv. legend), Choice gVF, weight 4.068 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVT (to the Prince of Youth), Numerian standing slightly left, bare head left, wearing military garb, globe in right hand, long scepter in left hand, KAς in exergue; SOLD


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA34811. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 394, Bastien 554, VF, weight 3.678 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust left, holding shield decorated with Medusa and spear over shoulder; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, raising branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B left; rare; SOLD


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Ticinum was a municipality and an important military site (a castrum) under the Roman Empire. In 476, Odoacer defeated Flavius Orestes at Ticinum after a long siege. To punish the city for helping his rival, Odoacer destroyed it completely. After the Lombard's conquest, Pavia became the capital of their kingdom, 568 - 774.
RB73871. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 366; Venèra IV 418 (24 ex.); Pink VI-2 p. 24; SRCV III 12219; Cohen VI 76 (3f.), VF, excellent centering, nice green patina, some light corrosion and marks, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D.; obverse M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Numerian walking left, holding baton pointed down in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, VIXXI in exergue; SOLD


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The VNDIQVE VICTORES legend translates to "Victorious everywhere." Victores is plural and refers to the two Emperors Numerian and Carinus. RIC notes, "sometimes between two captives." Our research indicates this type is rare.
RA26668. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 24 (also 6th officina); RIC V-2 423; Cohen VI 118; Pink VI-2 p. 35, series 3b; SRCV III 12258, VF, weight 4.111 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, obverse IMP NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VNDIQVE VICTORES (victorious everywhere), emperor standing left, globe in right hand, scepter in left hand, two captives at feet, KAς in exergue; rare variant of an interesting reverse; rare; SOLD


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA84506. Billon antoninianus, Venèra IV 55 - 60; RIC V-2 394; Hunter 33; Bastien Lyon 539; Cohen VI 43; Pink VI/2 p. 24; SRCV III 12249 var. (obv. leg., bust), Choice VF/F, excellent portrait, traces of silvering, porosity, reverse die wear, flan crack, weight 3.865 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 6th emission, August 283 - early 284 A.D.; obverse IMP C NVMERIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder, from the front; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing slightly left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse long scepter in left hand, B left; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; SOLD


Numerian, February or March 283 - October or November 284 A.D.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RA56332. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 378 (S); Cohen VI 115; SRCV III 12225; Pink p. 55, emission 2; Hunter IV 14 var. (9th officina), gVF, much silvering remaining, weight 4.249 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, Nov/Dec 282 - Feb/Mar 283 A.D; obverse IMP C M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVGGG (valor of the three emperors), emperor, on left, standing right, scepter in left hand, with right hand receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter (or Carus), Jupiter (or Carus) standing left, offering Victory on globe with right hand, long scepter in left hand, star above center, ∆ in center, XXI in exergue; scarce; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVONVMERIANO
IMPCNVMERIANVSAVG
IMPCNVMERIANVSPFAVG
IMPNVMERIANVSAVG
IMPNVMERIANVSPFAVG
MAVRNVMERIANVSNOBC
NVMERIANVSNOBCAES


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Bastien, P. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. De la réouverture de l'atelier par Aurélien à la mort de Carin (fin 274 - mi-285). (Wetteren, 1976).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 6: Macrianus to Diocletian & Maximianus. (Paris, 1886).
Gricourt, D. Ripostiglio della Venèra, Nuovo Catalogo Illustrato, Volume IV: Caro - Diocleziano. (Verona, 2000).
King, C. Roman Quinarii from the Republic to Diocletian and the Tetrarchy. (Oxford, 2007).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, |Part| I, Valerian to Florian. (London, 1927).
Milani, L. Il ripositglio della Venèra, Monete romane della seconda meta del terzo secolo. (Rome, 1880).
Pink, K. "Der Aufbau der Römischen münzprägung in der Kaiserzeit: VI/2. Carus und Söhne" in Numismatische Zeitschrift 80 (1963).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume Three, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Numerian