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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ 150-100 B.C.View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic 150 - 100 B.C.

Roman Republic, Q. Minucius M.f. Thermus, 103 B.C.

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The reverse refers to the moneyer's ancestor, Q. Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, consul in 193 B.C., who distinguished himself by his bravery against the Ligurians.
RR88379. Silver denarius, Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, RSC I Minucia 19, BMCRR Italy 653, RBW Collection 1174, SRCV I 197, gVF, attractive style, light marks, some die wear, exergue not fully struck, weight 3.670 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 60o, Rome mint, 103 B.C.; obverse head of Mars left, wearing crested helmet, side ornamented with feather and annulet; reverse Roman soldier, on the left, fighting a barbarian, on the right, protecting a fallen comrade in center below, each holding a sword and shield, Roman soldier holds oval shield ornamented with a thunderbolt, barbarian wears a horned helmet, Q•TERM•MF in exergue; $270.00 (€229.50)
 


Roman Republic, Marcus Herennius, 108 - 107 B.C.

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The Cantanaean brothers, Amphinomus and Anapias, saved their parents after an eruption of Mt. Etna, carrying them on their shoulders to safety. This was a favorite story among the Romans, for whom duty to family was among the most important virtues, fundamental to the Roman ideal of pietas. This moneyer had some connection to Sicily.
RR88377. Silver denarius, Crawford 308/1a, RSC I Herennia 1, Sydenham 567, SRCV I 185, BMCRR I Rome 1263 var. (control), RBW Collection 1149 var. (control), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, light marks, frosty surfaces with slightest porosity, weight 3.791 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 108 - 107 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Pietas right, PIETAS (TA ligate) downward behind, (control symbol) below chin; reverse one of Cantanaean brothers running right, nude, bearing his father on his shoulders, his father looking back and raising right hand, M•HERENNI (HE ligate) downward on left; $225.00 (€191.25)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79630. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 743 (O AC8 / R 592); SNG Cop 1040 ff. (Thasos), VF, toned, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 16.745 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; $195.00 (€165.75)
 


Roman Republic, Lucius Cassius Caeicianus, c. 102 B.C.

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The yoke of oxen was used by the Romans as a symbol of colonization. This coin probably refers to a colony established by an ancestor of the moneyer. The control marks on the obverse and reverse are combined in opposite alphabetical order, e.g., A with X, B with V, C with T, down to K with M. -- The Coinage of the Roman Republic by Edward A. Sydenham
RR88380. Silver denarius, Crawford 321/1, Sydenham 594, RSC I Cassia 4, SRCV I 199, BMCRR I Rome 1730 var. (C• / T•), RBW Collection 1176 var. (controls), aVF, toned, banker's mark, bumps, scratches, tiny test cut on edge, weight 3.913 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 102 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Ceres left, wreathed in grain, CAEICIAN (AE and AN ligate) upward behind, C (control mark) upper right; reverse two oxen yoked left, plow and T (control mark) above, L•CASSI in exergue; ex FORVM (2002); $160.00 (€136.00)
 


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Spartacus, the Roman slave and rebel leader was born in 109 B.C. He died in 71 B.C.
RR88370. Silver denarius, Crawford 302/1, Sydenham 540, BMCRR Rome 537, RSC I Flaminia 1, RBW Collection 1144, SRCV I 179, VF, attractive toning, light bumps and marks, tight flan cutting off exergue, weight 4.020 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 195o, Rome mint, c. 109 - 108 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, ornamented with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing single drop earring and necklace, ROMA downward behind, X (mark of value) below chin; reverse Victory in biga right, raising wreath in extended right hand, reins in left hand, L FLAMINI below, CILO in exergue; $150.00 (€127.50)
 


Roman Republic, Mn. Aemilius Lepidus, 114 - 113 B.C.

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The triple-arch probably represents the Aqua Marcia, an aqueduct begun by M. Aemilius Lepidus and M. Fulvius Nobilior as Censors in 179 B.C.

Mn. Aemilius M.f. Lepidus was a moneyer, a magistrate, responsible for the production of the Roman coinage. Magistrates were not simple mint workers, they were officials who controlled the process, including the design on the coins themselves. During the Roman Republic, moneyers were called tresviri aere argento auro flando feriundo, literally "three men for casting (and) striking bronze, silver (and) gold (coins)"
RR88374. Silver denarius, Crawford 291/1, Sydenham 554, RSC I Aemilia 7, BMCRR Italy 590, RBW Collection 1124, SRCV I 168, VF, rough areas, edge crack, scratch on neck, weight 3.912 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 114 - 113 B.C.; obverse laureate and draped bust of Roma right, ROMA (MA ligate) upward before, X (XVI ligature, mark of value=16 asses) behind; reverse MN•AEMILIO (MN in monogram), horseman holding vertical spear (equestrian statue) right, on triple-arch containing L-E-P; ex Classical Numismatic Group; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Roman Republic, Unofficial, c. 169 - 91 B.C.

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Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M • and N• (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M• above; ex FORVM (2006), ex Goodman collection; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


Roman Republic, Marcus Vargunteius, c. 130 B.C.

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The Romans regarded Jupiter as the equivalent of Greek Zeus, and in Latin literature and Roman art, the myths and iconography of Zeus are adapted under the name Iuppiter. In the Greek-influenced tradition, Jupiter was the brother of Neptune and Pluto. Each presided over one of the three realms of the universe: sky, the waters, and the underworld.
RR88365. Silver denarius, Crawford 257/1, Sydenham 507, RSC I Vargunteius 1, BMCRR I Rome 1068, RBW Collection 1048, SRCV I 133, aVF, light tone, light and scratches marks, minor flan wave, slightest porosity, weight 3.700 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 15o, Rome mint, c. 130 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, crest with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing single drop earring and necklace, hair in three locks, M VARG (VAR ligate) behind, X (XVI ligature, mark of value=16 asses) below chin; reverse Jupiter in a slow quadriga right, nude to the waist, upright branch in right hand, thunderbolt and reins in left hand, ROMA in exergue; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


Roman Republic, M. Marcius Mn.f., 134 B.C.

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The First Servile War, 135 - 132 B.C., was an unsuccessful slave rebellion against the Roman Republic. The war was prompted by slave revolts in Enna on the island of Sicily. It was led by Eunus, a former slave claiming to be a prophet, and Cleon, a Cilician (from present-day Turkey) who became Eunus's military commander. After some minor battles won by the slaves, a larger Roman army arrived in Sicily and defeated the rebels.
RR88355. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 245/3, Sydenham 501a, BMCRR I Rome 1017, RBW Collection 1011, SRCV I 1151, aF, dark green patina, corrosion, edge crack, weight 5.255 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 134 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, M MARCI / MN F (MAR and MNF ligate) in two lines above, three pellets before, ROMA in exergue; ex Rudnik Numismatics, with an old collector tag dated 30 November 1932, with the cost noted as $.25; $120.00 (€102.00)
 


Roman Republic, Lucius Caesius, 112 - 111 B.C.

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An Egyptian papyrus of 112 B.C. issues instructions to a local official in the Fayum for the visit of a Roman senator, Lucius Memmius. He was apparently visiting for pleasure, to see the sights, and was to receive a reception similar to that which would be given to a great dignitary of the kingdom. Everything was to be ready for his entertainment, including food for the sacred crocodiles. It is an incidental light upon the subservience to members of the Roman elite which it was now thought politic to show in the Ptolemaic Kingdom.
RR88447. Silver denarius, Crawford 298/1, Sydenham 564, RSC I Caesia 1, BMCRR Italy 585, RBW Collection 1140, SRCV I 175, VF, toned, some pitting, a few scratches, weight 3.724 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 112 - 111 B.C.; obverse bust of Vejovis left, viewed from behind, wearing a taenia and a cloak over his left shoulder, hurling a thunderbolt with his right hand, ROMA monogram right; reverse the two Lares Praestites seated right, each holds long scepter in left hand, dog between them, head of Vulcan facing left and tongs above, LA (ligate) left, PRE (ligate) right, L·CÆSI in exergue; ex CNG auction 419 (25 Apr 2018), lot 340; $120.00 (€102.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Monday, March 18, 2019.
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Roman Republic Coins of 150-100 B.C.