Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Hanukkah!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Christmas!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958.

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Late Empire| ▸ |Procopius||View Options:  |  |  |   

Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and a general under Julian II. Some contemporary historians of Procopius claim that Julian II had meant for the general to succeed him instead of Jovian. Whether true or not, Jovian gained the throne and Procopius retired. After Jovian died, the next emperors, Valentinian and Valens, had Procopius arrested. Procopius escaped and, on 28 September 365, bribed two legions passing by Constantinople, proclaimed himself emperor, and took control of Thrace and Bithynia. In April 366, Valens defeated the troops of Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira in Phrygia, ending his revolt. Procopius fled the battlefield, but was captured at Nacoleia and executed on 27 May 366.


Click for a larger photo
VOT V abbreviates Votis Quinquennalibus, which means Procopius has completed vows (prayers and sacrifices) for five years of rule. In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action, a vow, or promise. It may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion and sacrifice, a bargaining expressed by "do ut des" (I give that you might give).
RS41366. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Constantinopolis 13e, SRCV V 19867, gVF, repaired, weight 2.033 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT V within wreath, •C•S; BROKEN and repaired (glued); rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Serenianus a general with a reputation for cruelty, was once the executioner of Constantius Gallus, and had previously served as Valens' comes domesticorum (commander of the imperial bodyguard). After Procopius rebelled, loyal to Valens, he went to Cyzicus, where an imperial officer named Venustus had retreated with money intended to pay the troops. Serenianus was confident in the city garrison and in the strength of the city walls, but Procopius wanted the payroll. He collected a strong army, besieged and captured the city. Serenianus was sent as a prisoner to Nicaea. During the night after Procopius was killed, Marcellus, a relative of Procopius in command of the garrison of Nicaea, entered the Palace where Serenianus was held, and killed him. Marcellus was later captured and executed.
RL35042. Bronze centenionalis, Lanz 100 (2000) lot 619; RIC IX 18 var. (draped bust); an unlisted extremely rare bust variation of a rare type, VF, weight 2.550 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, holding shield on ground and spear, CONSA in exergue; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Procopius' bronze was typically struck on undersized flans. Perfectly centered coins on large flans occur very rarely and if uncirculated and with good detail such as on this specimen they retail for at least $600 (2003).
SH06940. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2082, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a)6, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, aUNC, weight 3.03 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, CONSƥ in exergue; face on reverse not fully struck; rare (R2); SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The Roman general of the 5th century Procopius and his son, the emperor Anthemius, were descendants of the usurper Procopius.
RL26680. Bronze centenionalis, Unpublished in references; see CNG auction 236, lot 511; cf. RIC IX 4 (gold solidus), VF, weight 2.020 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 365 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), Procopius standing slightly left, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, CONSB in exergue; only three other examples of this type are known to Forum (all from auctions); extremely rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The mint at Heraclea was opened during the reign of Diocletian in 291 and continued to strike coins until it was closed by Leo I, c. 474 A.D.
RL34259. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, VF, weight 3.453 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, chi-rho Christogram above right, • left, SMHB in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Heraclea, the Greek city of Perinthos, later known as Heraclea Thraciea to distinguish it from Heraclea Pontica, is now Marmara Ereglisi in the European part of Turkey. The Roman mint was established by Diocletian shortly before his reform and was in use until the times of Theodosius II. Dates of operation: 291 - 450 A.D. Mint marks: H, HERAC, HERACL, HT, MHT, SMH, SMHT.
SH56024. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, gVF, weight 3.014 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, chi-rho Christogram above right, • right, SMHΓ in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
According to Zosimus, Julian gave Procopius an imperial robe, informing him of his intent to make him his successor. But Julian did not tell anyone of this intent and Jovian was acclaimed emperor. Procopius gave Jovian the robe. He told Jovian of Julian's intention but asked the new Emperor to allow him to retire to private life. Jovian accepted and Procopius and his family retired to Caesarea Mazaca.
SH71595. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2081, RIC IX 17a, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, VF, nice portrait, weight 2.913 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSΓ in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
According to Zosimus, Julian gave Procopius an imperial robe, informing him of his intent to make him his successor. But Julian did not tell anyone of this intent and Jovian was acclaimed emperor. Procopius gave Jovian the robe. He told Jovian of Julian's intention but asked the new Emperor to allow him to retire to private life. Jovian accepted and Procopius and his family retired to Caesarea Mazaca.
RL32743. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17a, SRCV V 19883, gVF, excellent centering, reverse flatly struck, weight 3.409 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSE• in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and general under Julian II. On 28 Sep 365, during the rule of Valentinian and Valens, he bribed two legions passing by Constantinople and proclaimed himself emperor. In April 366, Valens defeated Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira, ending his revolt. Procopius fled, but was later captured and executed.
RL37475. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17a, nice VF, weight 3.674 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSA• in exergue; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
Serenianus a general with a reputation for cruelty, was once the executioner of Constantius Gallus, and had previously served as Valens' comes domesticorum (commander of the imperial bodyguard). After Procopius rebelled, loyal to Valens, he went to Cyzicus, where an imperial officer named Venustus had retreated with money intended to pay the troops. Serenianus was confident in the city garrison and in the strength of the city walls, but Procopius wanted the payroll. He collected a strong army, besieged and captured the city. Serenianus was sent as a prisoner to Nicaea. During the night after Procopius was killed, Marcellus, a relative of Procopius in command of the garrison of Nicaea, entered the Palace where Serenianus was held, and killed him. Marcellus was later captured and executed.
RL71574. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 1928, RIC IX Nicomedia 10, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19884, VF, excellent centering, reverse weak, weight 2.962 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, SMNB in exergue; rare (R3); SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DNPROCOPIVSPFAVG

REFERENCES|

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II à Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Hahn, Wolfgang. Moneta Imperii Romani-Byzantinii. (Vienna, 1989).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Pearce, J.W.E. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Volume IX, Valentinian I - Theodosius I. (London 1933).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire...Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Friday, December 13, 2019.
Page created in 1.375 seconds.
Roman Coins of Procopius