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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Constantinian Era| ▸ |Constantius II||View Options:  |  |  |   

Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

The longest lived of Constantine the Great's sons and successors, he ruled until 361 A.D. Upon Constantine's death, Constantius received the entire eastern empire as his inheritance. Soon after he added Thrace to his empire and as his brothers were killed, he annexed their territories. When he defeated the Western usurper Magnentius he was master of the entire empire. Although he started campaigning along the Danube, war with Persia forced his return to the East. Shortly after, he received news that Julian II had been proclaimed Augustus against him. Constantius died on his way to fight this new usurper and Julian II became ruler of the Roman Empire.


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D., Mule with Constantius II Reverse

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An interesting mule between a Constans obverse and a Constantius II reverse. The correct legend for Constans is VOT X MVLT XX.
SH24842. Gold solidus, Depeyrot p. 215, 6/5 (2 spec);obverse RIC VIII 74 / reverse Constantius II RIC VIII 71, Choice EF, full circle centering, weight 4.238 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 340 - 350 A.D.; obverse CONSTANS AVGVSTVS, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, all within wreath; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG (victories of our two lord emperors), two victories facing one another, holding wreath inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX, TES in exergue, all in wreath; ex Harlan Berk; very rare; SOLD


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In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
SH30322. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 31, Choice EF, weight 4.540 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 340 - 350 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG (victories of our two lord emperors), VOTIS XV MVLTIS XX within wreath, jewel at top, tied at the bottom, SMAN∆ in exergue; very rare (R3); SOLD


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In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action "vow, promise", it may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion, a bargaining expressed by do ut des, "I give that you might give."
RS79818. Silver siliqua, RIC VIII Antioch 35 (R2), RSC V 338A, SRCV V 17925, Hunter V -, Cohen VII -, EF, well centered, toned, nice surfaces with a few light marks, weight 3.152 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch mint, c. 340 - 342 A.D.; obverse pearl-diademed head right, with eyes raised to heaven, no legend; reverse VOTIS / XV / MVLTIS / XX in four lines within laurel wreath with jewel at the top, tied at the bottom, ANT in exergue; very rare; SOLD


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In 354, Constantius II recalled his legate (and cousin) Constantius Gallus to Constantinople after receiving unfavorable reports about him. Caesar of the East, Gallus had successfully suppressed revolts in Palestine and central Anatolia. Constantius stripped him of his rank and later had him executed in Pola (in modern Croatia).
SH70831. Gold solidus, Depeyrot 6/3, RIC VIII Antioch 81 var. (unlisted officina), VF, digs and scratches on obverse, weight 4.225 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, late 347 - 355 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma on left, enthroned facing, holding spear; Constantinopolis on right, enthroned half-left, right foot on prow, scepter in left; both hold shield inscribed VOT / XX / MVLT / XXX in four lines; SMANI in ex; ex CNG auction 306, lot 431; ex Kelly J. Krizan M.D. Collection; rare; SOLD


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Gold does not tarnish, however, uncleaned ancient gold coins, such as this one, will sometimes have very light rose toning.
SH43070. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 83, VF, obverse graffiti, weight 4.376 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, late 347 - 19 Jan 350; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma on left, enthroned facing, holding spear; Constantinopolis on right, enthroned left, right foot on prow, scepter in left; both hold shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX; SMAN∆ in exergue; perfect centering; rare; SOLD


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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
SH46447. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 172 var. (10th officina not listed), aVF, weight 3.925 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, later part of 355 - 361 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma on left, enthroned facing, holding spear; Constantinopolis on right, enthroned left, foot on prow, scepter in left; both hold shield inscribed VOT XXXX, ANTI in exergue; very rare; SOLD


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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
SH05315. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 83, VF, weight 4.47 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, 10th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, late 347 - 19 Jan 350; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REIPVBLICAE, Roma on left, enthroned facing holding spear, Constantinopolis on right, enthroned left, foot on prow and holding scepter, both hold shield inscribed VOT XX MVLT XXX, SMANI in exergue; rare; SOLD


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SH15382. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Arles 238, attractive aVF, weight 4.000 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Constantia-Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, 355 - 360 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, helmeted, diademed and cuirassed facing bust, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis enthroned, holding wreath with VOT XXX MVLT XXXX in four lines, */KONSTAN (Constantia) in exergue (TAN in monogram); graffiti in obverse fields, graffiti on the right may be a standard with the ensign marked X or XX; rare (R3); SOLD


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.

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SH54921. Gold solidus, RIC VII Heraclea 102, VF, ex jewelry, weight 4.174 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 326 - 330 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA CAESAR NN (victory of our two princes), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, SMH in exergue; a few punches and scratches; rare; SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
SH56711. Gold solidus, RIC VIII Antioch 168, F, scratches and bumps, weight 3.633 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, 9th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 6 Nov 355 - 3 Nov 361 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVG, helmeted, diademed and cuirassed facing bust, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse GLORIA REI-PVBLICAE, Roma and Constantinopolis enthroned facing, holding shield inscribed VOT XXX MVLT XXXX in four lines, SMANΘ in exergue; rare (RIC R3); SOLD




  




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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CONSTANTIVSAVG
CONSTANTIVSAVGVSTVS
CONSTANTIVSMAXAVG
CONSTANTIVSNOBC
CONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
CONSTANTIVSPFAVG DNCONSTANTIAVGVSTI
DNCONSTANTIVSAVG
DNCONSTANTIVSMAXAVG
DNCONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
DNCONSTANTIVSPERPAVG
DNCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
FLACONSTANTIVSNOBC
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSAVG
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSNOBC
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSPERPAVG
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
FLIVLCONSTANTIVSPIVSFELIXAVG


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. De la réouverture de l'atelier en 318 à la mort de Constantin (318-337). Numismatique Romaine XIII. (Wetteren, 1982).
Bruun, P. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VII, Constantine and Licinius A.D. 313 - 337. (London, 1966).
Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Carson, R., H. Sutherland & J. Kent. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VIII, The Family of Constantine I, A.D. 337 - 364. (London, 1981).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II à Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Failmezger, V. Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity, 294 - 364 A.D. (Washington D.C., 2002).
King, C & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Milchev, S. The Coins of Constantine the Great. (Sophia, 2007).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty...Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).
Voetter, O. Die Münzen der romischen Kaiser, Kaiserinnen und Caesaren von Diocletianus bis Romulus: Katalog der Sammlung Paul Gerin. (Vienna, 1921).

Catalog current as of Thursday, November 21, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Constantius II