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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Fish||View Options:  |  |  | 

Fish

Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 550 - 450 B.C.

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Seirios (Sirius) was the god or goddess of the Dog-Star, the brightest star of the constellation Canis Major. The pre-dawn rising of the star in the path of the sun was believed to be the source of the scorching heat and droughts of midsummer. Seirios appears in many guises was variously described as Maira daughter of the Titan Atlas, Maira the dog of the hero Icarius, Lailaps the hound of Orion, and Kyon Khryseos the golden-hound of Zeus. It may also have been associated with Orthros ("Morning Twilight") the hound of Geryon, giant of the west. The star was no doubt also connected with the dog-loving goddess Hekate who was the daughter of Perses "the Destroyer" and Asteria "the Starry One." -- www.theoi.com/Titan/AsterSeirios.html
SH86217. Electrum stater, Von Fritze I (Nomisma VII) 104 & pl. 3, 23; Boston MFA 1433; SNG BnF 245; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Mysia -, VF, tight flan, edge cracks, weight 16.091 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos mint, c. 550 - 450 B.C.; obverse winged dog (Sirius?) seated left, head turned back right, curved archaic wing, wearing collar, tunny fish below to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; $5850.00 (Ä5148.00)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 500 - 450 B.C.

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Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
SL89446. Electrum hekte, SNG BnF 241; SNGvA 1180; BMC Mysia p. 32, 98; Von Fritze I 102; Rosen 482; de Luynes pl. XCII 2460; SNG Cop -, NGC XF, strike 3/5, surface 3/5 (2490378-004), weight 2.674 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 500 - 450 B.C.; obverse satyr left, tunny fish vertical with head down to left; reverse quadripartite incuse square; extremely rare; $1000.00 (Ä880.00)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 450 - 400 B.C.

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Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GS92808. Silver hemiobol, Von Fritze II, p. 37, 21 & pl. V, 24; SNGvA 7338; SNG BnF -, VF, well centered, struck with attractive style high-relief dies, slightly porous, weight 0.320 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, die axis 90o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse head of Hermes right, wearing winged petasos; reverse KY-ZI, tunny fish right; very rare; $120.00 (Ä105.60)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP88228. Bronze AE 21, Varbanov III 3292 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 60, 131; Moushmov 6117; SNG ANS 202 corr. (club in ex.); SNG Cop -, aVF, well centered, rough, earthen deposits, weight 5.434 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AY K M AVP CEY AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, Tyche seated left on throne, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, altar before her, fish left in exergue; $45.00 (Ä39.60)







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Catalog current as of Thursday, November 14, 2019.
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Fish