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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ PlentyView Options:  |  |  | 

Plenty (Ops)

In ancient Roman religion, Ops or Opis (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth goddess of Sabine origin. According to Roman tradition, the cult of Opis was instituted by Titus Tatius, one of the Sabine kings of Rome. Opis became the patroness of riches, abundance, and prosperity, with a temple in the Capitolium. Festivals were held in her honor.

Opis was the wife of Saturn, and also his sister and the daughter of Caelus. Her children were Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Juno, Ceres, and Vesta. When Saturn learned of a prophecy that his and Opis' children would overthrow him as leader, he ate his children one by one after they were born. Opis, being the loving mother that she was, could not just stand by and let the last of her children be eaten by her husband. So, she wrapped a rock in swaddling clothes, and fed that to Saturn instead of Jupiter. Opis then went on to raise Jupiter, and then helped him free his siblings from their father's stomach.


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Mastaura, Lydia

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Mastaura (north of modern Nazilli, Turkey) was located on the south slope of Mount Messogis on the river Chrysorhoas, a small affluent of the Maeander. The city only issued coins under the Roman Empire. Remains include parts of the city walls and an aqueduct, and the ruins of a theater and a few small buildings.
RP86736. Leaded bronze AE 16, RPC I 2676 (2 spec.); BMC Lydia p. 157, 8; Imhoof-Blumer LS p. 96, 4; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, dark patina, obverse slightly off center, some corrosion, weight 3.877 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mastaura (north of Nazilli, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, c. 55 - 60 A.D.; obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP (counterclockwise from upper left), bare head right; reverse MAΣTAY-PEITΩN (counterclockwise from upper left), cornucopia overflowing with grain and grapes, bound with taenia; very rare; $100.00 (Ä85.00)


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

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Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin.
SH03079. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8a, RSC III 33, BMCRE V 19, VF, weight 3.3 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse OPI DIVIN ∑ TR P COS II, Ops seated left, holding two stalks of grain; outstanding example of this very rare type; very rare (R2); SOLD


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

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Pertinax was the son of a humble charcoal-burner. After a successful career in the military, as a senator and then as praefect of the city of Rome, he reluctantly accepted the throne offered by the murderers of Commodus. After a reign of only 86 day he was murdered by mutinous guards.

Opis was the wife of Saturn, and also his sister and the daughter of Caelus. Her children were Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Juno, Ceres, and Vesta. When Saturn learned of a prophecy that his and Opis' children would overthrow him as leader, he ate his children one by one after they were born. Opis, being the loving mother that she was, could not just stand by and let the last of her children be eaten by her husband. So, she wrapped a rock in swaddling clothes, and fed that to Saturn instead of Jupiter. Opis then went on to raise Jupiter, and then helped him free his siblings from their father's stomach.
SH82706. Silver denarius, Bickford-Smith p. 54; cf. RSC III 33a; RIC IV 8a (R2); BMCRE V p. 4, 19 (Rome); Hunter III 6; SRCV II 6045 (all but Bickford-Smith, Rome mint), F, nice portrait, porous, legends weak, tight irregular flan, weight 2.508 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria mint, Jan - 28 Mar 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse OPI DIVIN TR P COS II, Ops (plenty) seated left on throne with ornamented back, two stalks of grain in right hand, leaning back on left hand resting on the edge of the seat behind; rare; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 14, 2018.
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Plenty