Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Asian Coins| ▸ |Japan||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of Japan

Japan, Fuchi-sen (Unknown Origin) c. 1668 - 1738, Kanei Tsuho

Click for a larger photo
Unpublished in Hartill or Jones Kanei. Jones includes 254 Kanei Tsuho varieties, not all the known varieties, but all the major varieties are listed.
JA87073. Copper 1 mon, Fuchi-sen (unknown origin); New Kanei; Hartill EJC -, Jones Kanei -, aF, kan obscured, encrustations, some corrosion, weight 2.079 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, uncertain mint, c. 1668 - 1738; obverse kan ei tsu ho; kan obscured; very unusual ei with S shaped curving right arm, hooked head, no hooks on feet, and large cursive dot; tsu with square open head, cursive dot, and drooping head on the radical; ho unremarkable; reverse plain; perhaps rare(?); SOLD


Japan, Musashi Province, Shiba, 1636 - 1640, Ko Kanei Tsuho, Yottsu Kusa Ten (Four Grass Dots)

Click for a larger photo
In 1636, the Tokugawa shogunate introduced official Kanei Tsuho coins to standardize copper coins and maintain a sufficient coin supply. Failure to accept the coins at the designated value of 4,000 to one ryo of gold was punishable by fines and ten days imprisonment and everyone in the village of the offender would also be punished. Needless to say the new coins were quickly accepted. The first issues, called Ko Kanei (Old Kanei), were minted from 1636 until 1668. Production was on a contract basis and a tax was payable in proportion to the quantity produced. The calligraphy on these earliest Kanei Tsuho was very consistent and no mintmarks were used, but some types can be attributed to specific mints by slight variations. Shin Kanei (New Kanei) were cast from 1668 until at least 1869. The later coins had much greater variation in calligraphy and frequently included mintmarks.
JA87078. Copper 1 mon, Old Kanei; Yottsu kusa ten (Four grass dots) variety; Hartill EJC 4.11; Masuo Kanei 64; SCWC KM 5, VF, encrustations, scrape on reverse, weight 3.292 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, Musashi Province, Shiba mint, 1636 - 1640; obverse kan ei tsu ho; Yottsu kusa ten (four grass dots) variety, cursive dots on all of the characters; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Mutsu Province, Sendai, Ishinomaki, 1784 - 1787, Sen Dai Tsu Ho

Click for a larger photo
Use of Sen Dai Tsu Ho coinage was strictly prohibited outside of the Mutsu Province.

Ishinomaki was seriously affected by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Approximately 46% of the city was inundated. Ishinomaki Okawa Elementary School lost 70 of 108 students and nine of 13 teachers and staff. As of 17 June 2011, a total of 3,097 deaths had been confirmed in Ishinomaki due to the tsunami, with 2,770 people remained unaccounted for. Approximately 29,000 city residents lost their homes.
JA92724. Iron sen, Hartill 6.30, JNDA 139.8, Krause KM 60, Jacobs-Vermeule -, F, light rust, weight 2.174 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Mutsu Province, Sendai, Ishinomaki mint, 1784 -1787; obverse Sen Dai Tsu Ho; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Mutsu Province, Sendai, Ishinomaki, 1784 - 1787, Sen Dai Tsu Ho

Click for a larger photo
Use of Sen Dai Tsu Ho coinage was strictly prohibited outside of the Mutsu Province.

Ishinomaki was seriously affected by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Approximately 46% of the city was inundated. Ishinomaki Okawa Elementary School lost 70 of 108 students and nine of 13 teachers and staff. As of 17 June 2011, a total of 3,097 deaths had been confirmed in Ishinomaki due to the tsunami, with 2,770 people remained unaccounted for. Approximately 29,000 city residents lost their homes.
JA92725. Iron sen, Hartill 6.30, JNDA 139.8, Krause KM 60, Jacobs-Vermeule -, F, light rust, light encrustation, weight 2.479 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Mutsu Province, Sendai, Ishinomaki mint, 1784 -1787; obverse Sen Dai Tsu Ho; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Rikuzen Province, Sendai, 1637 - 1640, Ko Kanei Tsuho

Click for a larger photo
In 1636, the Tokugawa shogunate introduced official Kanei Tsuho coins to standardize copper coins and maintain a sufficient coin supply. Failure to accept the coins at the designated value of 4,000 to one ryo of gold was punishable by fines and ten days imprisonment and everyone in the village of the offender would also be punished. Needless to say the new coins were quickly accepted. The first issues, called Ko Kanei (Old Kanei), were minted from 1636 until 1668. Production was on a contract basis and a tax was payable in proportion to the quantity produced. The calligraphy on these earliest Kanei Tsuho was very consistent and no mintmarks were used, but some types can be attributed to specific mints by slight variations. Shin Kanei (New Kanei) were cast from 1668 until at least 1869. The later coins had much greater variation in calligraphy and frequently included mintmarks.
JA87077. Copper 1 mon, Old Kanei; Hartill EJC 4.20; Masuo Kanei 249; SCWC KM 5, VF, bumps and marks, weight 3.541 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, Rikuzen Province, Sendai mint, 1637 - 1640; obverse kan ei tsu ho, right foot of ho at 45 degrees; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Echigo Province, Takada, 1637 - 1640, Ko Kanei Tsuho

Click for a larger photo
In 1636, the Tokugawa shogunate introduced official Kanei Tsuho coins to standardize copper coins and maintain a sufficient coin supply. Failure to accept the coins at the designated value of 4,000 to one ryo of gold was punishable by fines and ten days imprisonment and everyone in the village of the offender would also be punished. Needless to say the new coins were quickly accepted. The first issues, called Ko Kanei (Old Kanei), were minted from 1636 until 1668. Production was on a contract basis and a tax was payable in proportion to the quantity produced. The calligraphy on these earliest Kanei Tsuho was very consistent and no mintmarks were used, but some types can be attributed to specific mints by slight variations. Shin Kanei (New Kanei) were cast from 1668 until at least 1869. The later coins had much greater variation in calligraphy and frequently included mintmarks.
JA87079. Copper 1 mon, Old Kanei; Hartill EJC 4.25, Masuo Kanei 320, SCWC KM 5, VF, light bumps and marks, weight 4.077 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, Echigo Province, Takada mint, 1637 - 1640; obverse kan ei tsu ho, ho leans to the left and right foot of ho nearly touches the corner of the hole; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Echigo Province, Takada, 1637 - 1640, Ko Kanei Tsuho

Click for a larger photo
In 1636, the Tokugawa shogunate introduced official Kanei Tsuho coins to standardize copper coins and maintain a sufficient coin supply. Failure to accept the coins at the designated value of 4,000 to one ryo of gold was punishable by fines and ten days imprisonment and everyone in the village of the offender would also be punished. Needless to say the new coins were quickly accepted. The first issues, called Ko Kanei (Old Kanei), were minted from 1636 until 1668. Production was on a contract basis and a tax was payable in proportion to the quantity produced. The calligraphy on these earliest Kanei Tsuho was very consistent and no mintmarks were used, but some types can be attributed to specific mints by slight variations. Shin Kanei (New Kanei) were cast from 1668 until at least 1869. The later coins had much greater variation in calligraphy and frequently included mintmarks.
JA87082. Copper 1 mon, Old Kanei; Hartill EJC 4.25; Masuo Kanei 320; SCWC KM 5, VF, bumps and marks, tiny edge flaw, weight 3.488 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, Echigo Province, Takada mint, 1637 - 1640; obverse kan ei tsu ho, ho leans to the left and right foot of ho nearly touches the corner of the hole; reverse plain; SOLD


Japan, Mutsu Province, Sendai Domain, Ishinomaki, The Edo Period, 1768 - 1784

Click for a larger photo
Ishinomaki was seriously affected by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Approximately 46% of the city was inundated. Ishinomaki Okawa Elementary School lost 70 of 108 students and nine of 13 teachers and staff. As of 17 June 2011, a total of 3,097 deaths had been confirmed in Ishinomaki due to the tsunami, with 2,770 people remained unaccounted for. Approximately 29,000 city residents lost their homes.
JA89425. Iron 4 mon, Hartill 4.177, Ogawa 213, Jacobs-Vermeule K313 (scarce), VF, weight 2.782 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 0o, Mutsu Province, Sendai, Ishinomaki mint, 1768 - 1784; obverse Kan Ei Tsu Ho; reverse Sen (1000); scarce this nice; SOLD


Japan, Hitachi Province, Kuji-Gun Ota, 1768 - 1772, Shin Kanei Tsuho - Ku

Click for a larger photo
Hitachi-Matsuoka was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan, located in Hitachi Province (modern-day Ibaraki Prefecture). It was centered in what is now the city of Takahagi. The 6th daimyo of Matsuoka, 1703-1711, Nakayama Nobutoshi, moved his residence to Ota, and the domain was then referred to as Hitachiota Domain. His descendants continued to reside at Ota until the time of the 10th daimyo, Nakayama Nobutaka, 1771-1819 who returned the seat of the clan back to Matsuoka.
JA92732. Iron 1 mon, New Kanei; Hartill EJC 4.211, JNDA 133.67, Ogawa 316, gF/Fair, corrosion, deposits, weight 3.263 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 0o, Hitachi Province, Kuji-gun, Kizaki-mura, Ota mint, 1768 - 1772; obverse kan ei tsu ho, no claw on kan; reverse ku (Kuji-gun mintmark) above; SOLD


Japan, Echigo Province, Takada, 1637 - 1640, Ko Kanei Tsuho

Click for a larger photo
In 1636, the Tokugawa shogunate introduced official Kanei Tsuho coins to standardize copper coins and maintain a sufficient coin supply. Failure to accept the coins at the designated value of 4,000 to one ryo of gold was punishable by fines and ten days imprisonment and everyone in the village of the offender would also be punished. Needless to say the new coins were quickly accepted. The first issues, called Ko Kanei (Old Kanei), were minted from 1636 until 1668. Production was on a contract basis and a tax was payable in proportion to the quantity produced. The calligraphy on these earliest Kanei Tsuho was very consistent and no mintmarks were used, but some types can be attributed to specific mints by slight variations. Shin Kanei (New Kanei) were cast from 1668 until at least 1869. The later coins had much greater variation in calligraphy and frequently included mintmarks.
JA87081. Copper 1 mon, Old Kanei; Hartill EJC 4.25; Masuo Kanei 320; SCWC KM 5, VF, light bumps and marks, weight 3.861 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, Echigo Province, Takada mint, 1637 - 1640; obverse kan ei tsu ho, ho leans to the left and right foot of ho nearly touches the corner of the hole; reverse plain; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



REFERENCES|

Hartill, D. Early Japanese Coins. (Bedfordshire, UK, 2011).
Jacobs, N. & C. Vermeule. Japanese Coinage. (New York, 1972).
Jones, R. Attribution Guide to Shin Kan Ei Tsu Ho. (Kearney, NE, 1984).
Jones, R. History and Guide to the Copper Cash Coinage of Japan. (Kearney, NE, 2007).
Krause, C. & C. Mishler. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - ).
Kudo, Y. Shin Kanei Tsuho Zue. (Sapporo, 1998).
Masuo, T. Honpo Bita Sen Zufu. (Illustrated Catalogue of Our Country's Bita Sen) (Tokyo, 1982).
Masuo, T. Ko Kanei Sen Shi. (Old Kanei Coin Encyclopedia) (Tokyo, 1971).
Mitchiner, M. Oriental Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: the Ancient and Classical World. (London, 1978).
Mitchiner, M. Oriental Coins and Their Values, Vol. 3: Non-Islamic States & Western Colonies. (London, 1979).
Masuo, T. Honpo Bita Sen Zufu. (Illustrated Catalog of Our Country's Bita Sen). (Tokyo, 1982).
Masuo, T. Ko Kanei Sen Shi. (Tokyo, 1971).
Munro, N. Coins of Japan. (Yokohama, 1904).
Ogawa, Y. Shin Kanei Tsuho, The Catalog of Japanese Coins. (Japan, 1987).
Sakuraki, S, H. Wang, & P. Kornicki. Catalogue of the Japanese Coin Collection (Pre-Meiji) in the British Museum. (London, 2010).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 12, 2019.
Page created in 15.063 seconds.
Japan