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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Ionia| ▸ |Miletos||View Options:  |  |  |   

Miletos, Ionia

Miletos was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander River in ancient Caria. By the 6th century B.C., Miletus had earned a maritime empire with many colonies, but brushed up against powerful Lydia at home, and the tyrant Polycrates of its neighbor to the west, Samos. When Cyrus of Persia defeated Croesus of Lydia in the middle of the 6th century B.C., Miletus fell under Persian rule. Miletos, along with most of Anatolia, was taken from Persia by Alexander the Great in 334 B.C. Miletos' greatest wealth and splendor was reached during the Hellenistic era and Roman times. Its ruins are located near the modern town of Balat in Aydin Province, Turkey. The symbols found on coins of Miletos include the lion, a star, and Apollo.Miletus Bay


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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Lifetime Issue!
SH28064. Gold stater, Price 2084, Müller Alexander -, gVF, weight 8.578 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, thunderbolt below; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left holding wreath and ship's mast, H∆ monogram in lower right field; nicely centered; rare variety; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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In 334 B.C. the Siege of Miletus by the forces of Alexander the Great of Macedonia liberated the city from Persian rule, soon followed by most of Anatolia. Under Alexander, the city reached its greatest extent, occupying within its walls an area of approximately 90 hectares (220 acres). When Alexander died in 323 B.C., Miletus came under the control of Ptolemy, governor of Caria and his satrap of Lydia Asandrus, who had become autonomous. In 312 B.C. Antigonus I Monophthalmus sent Docimus and Medeius to free the city and grant autonomy, restoring the democratic patrimonial regime.
SL91312. Gold stater, ADM I series I, 9b (same dies); Price 2077; Müller Alexander 8; SNG München 571; SNG Saroglos 131; HGC 3.1 893f (S); SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 2/5, scrapes (2400710-003), weight 8.59 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 270o, Ionia, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, struck under Philoxenos, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, small thunderbolt under neck truncation; reverse Nike standing slightly left, head left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left hand, HA monogram left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; scarce; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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SH33202. Gold stater, Price 2146, Müller Alexander 1137, VF, weight 8.489 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 295 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, ΠAPO monogram and labrys left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

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Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as King.
SH42565. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 547(1), SGCV II 6886, gVF, weight 16.944 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, probably Ephesus or Miletos mint, obverse diademed head of Antiochos II right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTI−OXOY, Apollo seated left on omphalos, legs draped, bow in right, resting left on omphalos, monogram outer left; nice portrait, ex Freeman and Sear; SOLD


Miletos, Ionia, c. 600 - 550 B.C.

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Before the Persian invasion in the middle of the 6th century B.C., Miletus was the greatest and wealthiest of Greek cities and had a maritime empire with many colonies. After Cyrus of Persia defeated Croesus of Lydia in the middle of the 6th century B.C., Miletus fell under Persian rule.
SH56865. Electrum 1/12th stater, Linzalone LN1120, SNG Kayhan 444 - 448, Klein 415, SNG Cop -, Rosen -, Weidauer -, aVF, weight 1.129 g, maximum diameter 7.1 mm, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 600 - 550 B.C.; obverse lion's forepart right, right paw outstretched; reverse cross of four pellets connected to a central pellet within a quadralobe incuse; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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Lifetime Issue! Signed by the artist!(?) The K behind Herakles ear had traditionally been identified as the signature of the artist. Matt Kreuzer, however, believes the K (the Greek numeral 20) was used c. 325 B.C. to introduce the Attic drachm to Miletos by indicating either that 20 of these was equal to a gold stater, or that one of these drachm was equal to 20 of the 3 to 4 gram bronzes circulating at the time.
SH63774. Silver drachm, ADM I 80 (same dies), Price 2090A, SNG Alpha Bank 630, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop-, SNG Saroglos -, Choice VF, toned, weight 4.214 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, lifetime issue, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck, K on lion's jaw behind Herakles' ear; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg forward, feet on footstool, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, ∆H monogram (control) in left field; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

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It was common in the 19th century for museums and occasionally collectors to mark coins with a number in ink. The number can be removed with a solvent cleaner.
SH29309. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2150, gVF, museum no. (6) in ink, weight 16.930 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Miletus (near Balat, Aydin, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 295 - 275 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI monogram left; ex Harlan J. Berk; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck shortly after Alexander the Great's death during the joint reign of Philip III, Alexander's brother, and the infant king Alexander IV, Alexander's son with the Bactrian princess Roxana. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. Miletus also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but the Alexander named on this coin was more likely the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV.
SH68252. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2099b, Müller Alexander -, Choice VF, remarkable full circle border of dots on the obverse, weight 17.113 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 45o, Ionia, Miletus (near Balat, Aydin, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, grain ear in left field; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 216, lot 2279; SOLD


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 319 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
GS37605. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2099C, gVF, very attractive, good style, a few reverse scratches, weight 17.120 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 45o, Ionia, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, struck under Asandros, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, grain-ear (control) left; SOLD


Miletos, Ionia, c. 300 - 250 B.C.

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Miletos was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander River. Miletos, along with most of Anatolia, was taken from Persia by Alexander the Great in 334 B.C. Miletos' greatest wealth and splendor was reached during the Hellenistic era and Roman times. Its ruins are located near the modern town of Balat in Aydin Province, Turkey. The symbols found on coins of Miletos include the lion, a star, and Apollo. The star may represent the Sun in association with Apollo.Miletus Bay
SH25334. Silver didrachm, Deppert-Lippitz 468 - 470; BMC Ionia p. 191, 83; Waddington 1823, VF, toned, lamination flaw at 5:00 on the reverse, weight 6.453 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, magistrate Echeboulos, c. 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse lion standing left, head turned back looking a star in field above, Miletos monogram left, EXEBOYΛOΣ (magistrate) exergue; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

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Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
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Catalog current as of Friday, December 13, 2019.
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Miletos