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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Other Gods||View Options:  |  |  |   

Other Gods

Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior

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The Three Graces, named Euphrosyne, Aglaia and Thalia, were the attendants of Aphrodite (Venus). They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, nude and sometimes holding apples.
RP28313. Bronze AE 23, AMNG I/I 603, VF, weight 7.812 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆OMNA CEB, draped bust right; reverse MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN, the three graces, outer two each holding an apple; SOLD


Herbessos, Sicily, c. 344 - 335 B.C.

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The site of the native Sikel Herbessos is uncertain but it was probably located near Leontinoi. Like other Sikel towns, it supported Carthage against Syracuse, however, in 396 B.C. Herbessos formed an alliance with Dionysos I. In 310 B.C., Agathokles installed a garrison to hold it against Carthage. In 309 B.C., with the aid of Akragas, the city expelled the garrison and claimed its freedom. In the Punic Wars, Herbessos was repeatedly held by Carthage until taken by Rome. About 213 B.C., Herbesso became a civitas decumana, paying 1/10th of its annual harvest to Rome. Although it probably continued to exist for centuries, it then disappears from history.
GI72187. Bronze drachm, Castrizio series II, 1 (354- 344 B.C); Calciati III, p. 252, 4; SNG Morcom 593; SNG Lloyd 1002; Rizzo pl. LIX, 17; HGC 2 411 (R2), VF, overstruck on Syracuse drachm, weight 32.639 g, maximum diameter 33.1 mm, die axis 270o, Herbessos mint, c. 344 - 335 B.C.; obverse EPBEΣΣINΩN, head of Sikelia right, hair adorned with myrtle olive wreath; reverse forepart of man-faced bull right; big bronze!; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

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Demetrius III Eucaerus ("the Timely") was nicknamed Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean Priest King Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SH28097. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber II 2451(5), SNG Spaer 2862 var. (date); Houghton II 799 var. (date); Newell LSM 127 var. (monogram), VF, scratch on reverse, a little rough, weight 15.769 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 91 - 90 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios III right, curly beard, diadem ends fall straight behind, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY ΘEOY ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ, cult image of Atargatis standing facing, holding flower, barley stalk behind each shoulder, N over ∆ (controls) outer left, date BKΣ (year 222 of the Seleucid Era) in exergue, laurel wreath border; very rare; SOLD


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

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Pertinax was the son of a humble charcoal-burner. After a successful career in the military, as a senator and then as praefect of the city of Rome, he reluctantly accepted the throne offered by the murderers of Commodus. After a reign of only 86 day he was murdered by mutinous guards.

Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin.
SH85565. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8a (R2); RSC III 33; BMCRE V p. 4, 19; Hunter III 6; SRCV II 6045, VF, excellent portrait, tight flan, light marks, corrosion, edge cracks, weight 3.100 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse OPI DIVIN TR P COS II, Ops (plenty) seated left on throne with ornamented back, two stalks of grain in right hand, leaning back on left hand resting on the edge of the seat behind; rare; SOLD


Pertinax, 31 December 192 - 28 March 193 A.D.

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Pertinax was the son of a humble charcoal-burner. After a successful career in the military, as a senator and then as praefect of the city of Rome, he reluctantly accepted the throne offered by the murderers of Commodus. After a reign of only 86 day he was murdered by mutinous guards.

Ops, more properly Opis, (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth-goddess in Roman mythology of Sabine origin.
SH75306. Silver denarius, RIC IV 8a (R2); RSC III 33; BMCRE V p. 4, 19; Hunter III 6; SRCV II 6045, F, excellent portrait, weak legends, weight 2.686 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right; reverse OPI DIVIN TR P COS II, Ops seated left, two stalks of grain in right hand, leaning back on left hand resting on the edge of the seat behind; rare; SOLD


Neapolis, Campania, Italy, c. 275 - 250 B.C.

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In angst at not seducing Ulysses with her voice, the siren Parthenope, threw herself into the sea and died. Her body washed up on the shore near Neapolis. There she was not envisioned as one of the insidious monsters of Homer, but rather like a dead hero, she was enshrined and deified and her name was given to an early settlement on the site. Neapolis held funerary torch-races to commemorate Parthenope and her nearby tomb and sanctuary were among the local places of interest. The river god Achelous was her father.
GS84679. Silver nomos, SNG Cop 440; SNG ANS 381; BMC Italy 100, 63; Sambon 483; HN Italy 586; SNG Cop -, Choice VF, fine style, toned, well centered on a tight flan, porous, weight 7.114 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, Neapolis (Naples, Italy) mint, c. 275 - 250 B.C.; obverse head of siren Parthenope left, wearing taenia, triple-pendant earring, and necklace, EY behind neck; reverse the river-god Achelous in the form of a man-faced bull, walking left, head turned facing, Nike flying left above, placing wreath on river-god's head, ΛOY below, NEOΠOΛITHΣ in exergue; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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The reverse legend abbreviates, "Consul ludos saeculares fecit" (Consul, he made the secular games), commemorating the Ludi Saeculares (Secular Games) of 204. Liber and Hercules were the favored deities at Severus' birthplace, Lepcis Magna.
RS73196. Silver denarius, RSC III 50, RIC IV 74(a) (R2), BMCRE V 275A, SRCV II 6796, VF, nice boy portrait, centered, two small lamination defects on the reverse, weight 3.238 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 204 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped young bust right; reverse COS LVDOS SAECVL FEC, Bacchus (or Liber) and Hercules standing confronted, Bacchus feeding panther from cup in right and holding thyrsus in left, Hercules resting right hand on grounded club, lion skin on left arm; scarce; SOLD


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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This type is very rare with less than a dozen examples known, apparently from only two reverse dies. This example from a different reverse die than the British Museum example. Saeculum Frugiferum, the Roman personification of the Fertility of the Age, is depicted on Roman coins only in the Severan period. He was associated with an African god with the Greek name of Aion Karpophoros, the patron deity of Hadrumetum, Byzacene (North Africa).
RS87263. Silver denarius, RIC IV 19 (R); RSC III 622; Hunter III 1; cf. BMCRE V W4 (aureus, Cohen 622 denarius noted); SRCV II -, VF, excellent portrait, attractive style, light rose toning, light marks, small edge cracks, weight 3.236 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, Rome mint, early June to end 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEPT SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right; reverse SAEC FRVGIF COS, Saeculum Frugiferum standing slightly left, radiate, head left, bare to the waist, himation around hips and thighs, winged caduceus upright in extended right hand, transverse trident in left hand; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, C. Annius T.f. T.n. Luscus and L. Fabius L.f. Hispaniensis, 82 - 81 B.C.

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This issue was minted by special decree of the Senate to support the proconsul Annius, sent by Sulla to campaign against Sertorius in Spain. Crawford attributes the early part of this issue, which bears the name of the quaestor L. Fabius L.f. Hispaniensis, to Northern Italy and the latter part, which bears the name of the quaestor, C. Tarquitius P.f., to Spain. The deity depicted on the obverse is uncertain, but may be Anna Perenna, a sister of Dido, worshiped in Italy. The Annia gens may have claimed descent from her. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
SH74528. Silver denarius, Crawford 366/2b, Sydenham 748d, RSC I Annia 3a, SRCV I 290, Choice gVF, very attractive coin, superb style, nicely toned, weight 3.819 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 15o, Northern Italian or Spanish mint, 82 - 81 B.C.; obverse ∑C∑ANNI∑T∑F∑T∑N∑PRO∑COS∑EX∑S∑C∑, diademed and draped bust of Anna Perenna(?) right, bead and reel border; reverse Victory driving a quadriga right, palm frond in right, reins in left, Q∑ above, E∑ below, L∑FABI∑L∑F∑HISP∑ in exergue; SOLD


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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The goddess Kratesis, whose attributes are a Nike and a trophy, is neither Victory nor Virtus, the two Roman types she most resembles. She is the goddess of Roman strength and authority.
RP84744. Billon tetradrachm, RPC I 5361; Geissen 249; Dattari 328; Milne 366; Curtis 239; BMC Alexandria 210; SNG BnF 690; SNG Cop 158; SNG Milan 766; Kampmann 18.7; Emmett 185, VF, dark toning, well centered on a tight flan cutting off part of legends, weight 13.280 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, LA (year 1) lower right; reverse KPA-TH-ΣIΣ, Kratesis standing facing, head left, wearing chiton, Nike offering wreath in her extended right hand, trophy of captured arms in her left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; very rare; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Tuesday, August 20, 2019.
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Other Gods