Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Hanukkah!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Christmas!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958.

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Sicily| ▸ |Punic Sicily||View Options:  |  |  |   

Carthagians in Sicily

Sicily, Siculo-Punic, 4th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH08966. Silver tetradrachm, Müller Afrique p. 76, type 23; SNG Cop (Zeugitania) 86; SNG Cop (Sicily) 982, EF, extraordinary high relief, superb style, some mint luster, weight 16.84 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, c. 320/315 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Tanit left, wreathed in barley, wearing triple-pendant earring, and necklace, four dolphins around swimming clockwise; reverse horse's head left, date palm behind, Punic letter M below; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Siculo-Punic, "Questor" Series, c. 300 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH15387. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic IV, Series 5b, EF, weight 16.251 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 90o, c. 300 - 289 B.C.; obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm behind, Punic inscription below; fantastic eye appeal, toned; SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 325 - 300 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 311 B.C., Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, invaded the Carthaginian holdings on Sicily and laid siege to Akragas. Hamilcar led the Carthaginian response, and by 310 controlled almost all of Sicily and laid siege to Syracuse itself. In desperation, Agathocles secretly led an expedition of 14,000 men to Africa, hoping to save his rule by leading a counterstrike against Carthage itself. Carthage was forced to recall Hamilcar and most of his army from Sicily. Agathocles was eventually defeated in 307 B.C., but he escaped back to Sicily and negotiated a peace which maintained Syracuse as a stronghold of Greek power in Sicily.
SH12231. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6436, SNG Cop 983, EF, weight 17.096 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of young Herakles clad in lion's skin; reverse horse's head, l.; palm tree behind, Punic legend AMHMHNTE (people of the camp) below; beautiful coin; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, c. 325 - 300 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SH14068. Silver tetradrachm, SGCV II 6438, Jenkins 314, SNG Cop 89, Choice EF (ICG EF45), weight 16.48 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 315o, military camp mint, obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm behind, Punic inscription (People of the Camp) below; rarely this well centered, beautifully toned, fantastic eye appeal; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Siculo-Punic, c. 320 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SH68473. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic, series 5a, 290 (O93/R238); SNG Cop 985; SNG München 1618, aEF, die break on horse's eye, toned, weight 16.743 g, maximum diameter 23.98 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, military camp mint, c. 320 - 289 B.C.; obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm tree behind, Punic inscription below: MHMHNT (people of the camp); SOLD


Carthaginians in Sicily, 300 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SL84036. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic 394 (O120/R322); SNG Cop VIII 91; Dewing 983; SGCV II 6438; HGC 2 295, NGC Choice VF, strike 4/5, surface 5/5 (3819620-001), weight 17.03 g, maximum diameter 23 mm, die axis 225o, Sicilian mint, 300 - 289 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion's scalp; reverse horse's head left, palm tree behind, Punic inscription MHSBM (paymasters) below; NGC certified (slabbed); SOLD


Eryx, Sicily, c. 344 - 339 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Eryx was founded by Elymians on the summit of a mountain in northwest Sicily, about 10 km from Drepana (modern Trapani), and 3 km from the sea-coast, at the site of modern Erice. The Elymians maintained friendly relations and alliances with Carthage and came into frequent conflict with the Greeks. In 397 B.C., however, Eryx joined Dionysius I of Syracuse. It was speedily recovered by Himilco the following year. It again fell into the hands of Dionysius shortly before his death in 367 B.C., but was soon recovered by the Carthaginians, and probably was subject to their rule until the expedition of Pyrrhus in 278 B.C.
GS84640. Silver litra, Campana CNAI 47; Jenkins I pl. 24, 24; SNG ANS 1348; Jameson 1894; Winterthur 630; HGC 2 324 (????) corr. (male head/man-faced bull); SNG Cop -, VF, toned, tight flan, obverse slightly off center, weight 0.567 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 270o, Eryx (Erice, Sicily) mint, Punic rule, c. 344 - 339 B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, hair in a bun at the crown, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace; reverse bull standing left, Punic "RK" above; from the Nicholas Molinari Collection; very rare; SOLD


Siculo-Punic, "Questor" Series, c. 300 - 289 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
"The types too are generally considered to be Carthaginian, especially that of the horse's head by itself, which is taken as a reference to the myth recounted by Vergil, that the companions of Dido on her expedition to found Carthage 'dug up a horse's head at the spot indicated by Juno.' Moreover, according to Stephanus, Carthage was also called KAKKABH, a word that in Punic means 'the head of a horse'." -- Eckhel, Doctrina I (1792), pp. 229-230. Eckhel himself has some hesitation about accepting this explanation of the type, however, because of the appearance of a similar horse's head type on early Roman didrachms with the inscription ROMA.
SH38686. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins, SNR 57, 367, toned VF, many nicks, weight 16.648 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, c. 300 - 289 B.C.; obverse Melkart-Herakles head right wearing lion's skin knotted at neck; reverse horse head left, palm behind, Punic inscription below, astragalos lower left; SOLD


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, Second Punic War, c. 213 - 211 B.C., Sicilian Mint

Click for a larger photo
Triptolemus was a demigod of the Eleusinian mysteries who presided over the sowing of grain-seed and the milling of wheat. His name means He who Pounds the Husks. In myth, Triptolemos was one of the Eleusinian princes who kindly received Demeter when she came mourning the loss of her daughter Persephone. The young goddess was eventually returned to her from the Underworld. Demeter, in her munificence, instructed Triptolemos in the art of agriculture and gave him a winged chariot drawn by serpents so that he might travel the world spreading her gift.
SH11111. Silver quarter shekel, SNG Cop 380, gVF+, weight 1.782 g, maximum diameter 14.53 mm, die axis 315o, obverse head of Triptolemus right, wearing wreath of barley ears, dot border; reverse horse galloping right, Punic letters below, linear border; superb with nice metal and surfaces, attractively toned with some red and gold, ex Coinhunter (Philadelphia dealer); SOLD


Sicily or North Africa, c. 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
GB33540. Fouree silver plated hemidrachm, cf. Solous AE, c. 300 - 241 B.C., Calciati I, p. 311, 16 (bronze coin), aEF, flaked areas of plating, weight 1.266 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, obverse bearded bare head right; reverse horse right; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



REFERENCES|

Alexandropoulos, J. Les monnaies de l'Afrique antique: 400 av. J.-C. - 40 ap. J.-C. (Toulouse, 2000).
Calciati, R. Corpus Nummorum Siculorum. The Bronze Coinage, Vol. I - III. (Milan, 1983 - 1987).
Gabrici, E. La monetazione del bronzo nella Sicila antica. (Palermo, 1927).
Jenkins, G. Coins of Punic Sicily. (Zürich, 1997).
Jenkins, G. & R. Lewis. Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No. 2. (London, 1963).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Müller, L. et. al. Numismatique de l'ancienne Afrique. (Copenhagen, 1860-1862).
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Sicily. (London, 1876).
Rizzo, G. Monete greche della Sicilia. (Rome, 1946).
Salinas, A. Le monete delle antiche città di Sicilia descritte e illustrate da Antonino Salinas. (Palermo, 1871).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 1: Italy - Sicily. (West Milford, NJ, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 6: Sikelia. Punier in Sizilien. Lipara. Sardinia. Punier in Sardinien. Nachträge. (Berlin, 1980).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 2: Sicily - Thrace. (London, 1947).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain X, John Morcom Collection. (Oxford, 1995).
Viola, M. Corpus Nummorum Punicorum. (Milan, 2010).

Catalog current as of Friday, December 13, 2019.
Page created in 0.737 seconds.
Punic Sicily