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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Dacia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Dacia

The eagle and the lion are symbols of the Legions V Macedonica and XIII Gemina, which were quartered in Provincia Dacia.


Danubian Celts or Geto-Dacians, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C., Imitative of Philip III of Macedonia

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All three referenced specimens were struck with the same dies with the same obverse die break. The blundered inscription downward on the right appears to combine parts of the names AΛEΞAN∆POY (Alexander the Great) and ΦIΛIΠΠOY (Philip III of Macedonia). The inscription below has little resemblance to BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king), found on the Macedonian prototypes. It is likely that this obverse die was one that was used so long and became so worn that eventually obverses struck were a plain featureless dome.
GS82668. Silver tetradrachm, CCCBM I 185; Göbl OTA tf. 44, 579/9; Lanz 899 (all struck with the same dies, and with the same obv. die break before eyes), gVF, sculptural high relief head of Herakles, toned, well centered and struck, some die wear, die break on obv., tiny cut on reverse edge, weight 16.206 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 3rd - 2nd century B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, "sun" over "double axe" monogram left, Z (appearing as H) below throne, AAIΓIΓIIΓIΓIOΛ downward on right, ΠΠIΠΠIΠ below, all in a round convex incuse; SOLD


Celts, Danube Region, Imitative of Thasos, Thrace, c. 120 - 10 B.C.

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This type was first struck by Thasos, c. 168 - 148 B.C. Roman authorities struck imitatives, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia. Tribal groups (mostly Celtic) struck imitatives from about 120 to possibly as late as 10 B.C.

Göbl OTA Class IV is defined by a reverse legend without attempt to form actual letters (appearing mostly as I, H, V, Λ, Π, U and O). This coin is unusual because the obverse style is quite close to that of some of the Roman Thasian imitatives. Most Class IV examples have a more devolved portrait.
SH65451. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA Class IV; imitative of SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, typical wavy flan, weight 16.178 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 120 - 10 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse devolved legend, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, blundered monogram inner left; SOLD


Celts, Danube Region, Imitative of Thasos, Thrace, c. 120 - 10 B.C.

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This type was first struck by Thasos, c. 168 - 148 B.C. Roman authorities struck imitatives, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia. Tribal groups (mostly Celtic) struck imitatives from about 120 to possibly as late as 10 B.C.

Göbl OTA Class IIII is defined by a dissolution of the legend to illiterate imitations of Greek letters.
SH65452. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA Class III; imitative of SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, typical wavy flan, weight 16.190 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 120 - 10 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse devolved legend, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, blundered monogram inner left; SOLD


Geto-Dacian(?), c. 75 - 105 A.D., Imitative of Vespasian or Titus Denarius

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Tribal peoples outside the Empire struck coinage imitative of Roman types beginning in the second century B.C. and continued to strike imitative types even after the Western Empire ceased to exist.
CE68897. Silver denarius, Davis I4 (this coin); for possible Roman prototype see RIC Vespasian 702 and 705 (emperor seated right), F+, weight 3.319 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 75 - 105 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Vespasian or Titus right, blundered legend around; reverse Emperor seated left, branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, blundered legend around; from the Jyrki Muona Collection, ex Gemini LLC auction IX, lot 739, ex Phillip Davis Collection, said to have been found in Romania; very rare; SOLD


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

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Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, the Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century. The reverse legend refers to Consular Legate (Governor) Marcus Claudius Agrippa.
RP88337. Bronze AE 26, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.23.46.4 (R4), Varbanov I 3383 (R5), Moushmov 1234, VF, dark patina, edge crack, light deposits, weight 11.625 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 225o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Marcus Agrippa, 217 - 218 A.D.; obverse AY K OΠΠEΛ CEYH MAKPINOC, laureate head right; reverse YΠ AΓPIΠΠA NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC ICTPΩ, city gate with three crenelated towers and closed paneled doors; ex Forum (2009), ex Zach Beasley architectural theme collection (2001), ex Malter Galleries; SOLD


Dacia, After 85 B.C., Imitative of Roman Republic, Types of Mn Fonteius

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Imitatives of Roman Republic Denarii, such as this one, are often identified as Celtic, but Philip Davis convincingly argues that most of these denarii are probably Dacian.
RR63690. Silver denarius, cf. Davis M108, Davis Apvlvm XLIII 81 and 83, Crawford 353/1a (official, Rome mint), VF, weight 3.020 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse bare head right, branch behind, no legend; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue all within laurel wreath; SOLD


Celts, Danube Region, Imitative of Thasos, Thrace, c. 120 - 10 B.C.

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This type was first struck by Thasos, c. 168 - 148 B.C. Roman authorities struck imitatives, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia. Tribal groups (mostly Celtic) struck imitatives from about 120 to possibly as late as 10 B.C.

Göbl OTA Class IIII/A is defined by a dissolution of the legend to illiterate imitations of Greek letters and added annulets (O’s), often with a pellet in the center (Q's).
SH65453. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA Class III/A; imitative of SNG Cop 1040 ff., F, typical wavy flan, weight 16.646 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 45o, tribal mint, c. 120 - 10 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse devolved legend with Θ's, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, M inner left; SOLD


Celts, Danube Region, Imitative of Thasos, Thrace, c. 120 - 10 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type was first struck by Thasos, c. 168 - 148 B.C. Roman authorities struck imitatives, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia. Tribal groups (mostly Celtic) struck imitatives from about 120 to possibly as late as 10 B.C.

Göbl OTA Class IV is defined by a reverse legend without attempt to form actual letters (in this case appearing as all I's and O's). This coin is unusual because Herakles is reversed. On the prototype and nearly all imitatives he rests his right hand on the club, his left hand is on his hip, and the symbol is left.
SH65454. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA Class IV; imitative of SNG Cop 1040 ff., VF, grainy, typical wavy flan, weight 15.160 g, maximum diameter 34.2 mm, die axis 270o, tribal mint, c. 120 - 10 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse devolved legend, Herakles standing facing, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on right arm, right hand on hip, resting left hand on grounded club before him, O right; rare Herakles variant; SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS88851. Silver denarius, Woytek 220c, BMCRE III 218, Hunter II 66, RSC II 417b, RIC II 187, Strack I 94, Choice VF, excellent portrait, well centered, light toning, light marks, tiny edge crack, weight 3.051 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 106 - 107 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P, laureate bust right with aegis on left shoulder; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Pax seated left, olive branch in right hand, transverse long scepter in left hand, a kneeling Dacian at her feet; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1047; SOLD


Dacia, After 75 B.C., Hybrid Imitative Roman Republic Denarius

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The Dacians struck some of their imitative denarii using transfer dies made from official Roman coins. Most of the Dacian transfer die imitatives are hybrids with mismatched obverses and reverses. Making each die destroyed the coin, so the same coin could not be used to make both dies. Since matching appropriate types was not important to the Dacians, a completely different coin type could be used to make the second die in the pair. The few know examples with matched obverse and reverses are probably the result of coincidence rather than intent.
RR63703. Silver denarius, Davis -, Davis Apvlvm -; cf. O: Rome, 75 B.C., RSC I Farsuleia 2, Craw 392/1b, Syd 789/ R: Rome, 148 B.C., RSC I Atilia 9, Craw 225/1, Syd 444, weight 3.387 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 90o, obverse MENSOR, diademed and draped bust of Libertas right, S C behind; reverse the Dioscuri on horseback to right, M. ATILI below horses, ROMA in exergue; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Aleksandar, I.K. Catalog Provincial Coins of Dacia, the Roman Province. (2008). Allen, D. Catalogue of Celtic Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 1: Silver Coins of the East Celts and Balkan Peoples. (London, 1987).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006).
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info.
Dembski, G. Münzen der Kelten. Sammlungskataloge des Kunsthistorischen Museums. (Vienna, 1998).
Göbl, R. Ostkeltischer Typen Atlas. (Braunschweig, 1973).
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Kostial, M. Kelten im Osten. Gold und Silber der Kelten in Mittel und Osteuropa. Sammlung Lanz. (München, 1997).
Pick, B. Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Pink, K. Münzprägung der Ostkelten und Ihrer Nachbarn. (Harrassowitz, 1939).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 20, 2019.
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Dacia