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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Mints| ▸ |Rome||View Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Rome (c. 540 - 775)

The Rome mint reopened about 540, after Justinian's conquests in Italy. It closed during the reign of Constantine V (741- 775).


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
RS87781. Silver denarius, RIC III 22; RSC II 507; BMCRE IV p. 388, 15; Hunter II 2; cf. SRCV II 4925 (TR P XVI), Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, radiating flow lines, some luster, light toning, thin die cracks on reverse, weight 3.322 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 161 - 162 A.D.; obverse IMP M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROV DEOR TR P XV COS III, Providentia standing slightly left, head left, globe in extended right hand, cornucopia in left hand; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS87613. Silver denarius, unpublished variety; RIC II 208(a) var. (no slight drapery), RSC II 640a var. (same), BMCRE III 542 var. (same), Strack 334, SRCV II -, Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, bumps and scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.265 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas seated left, cornucopia in right, caduceus in left, COS III P P (consul three times, father of the country) in exergue; extremely rare variant - this is the only example of this bust variety for this type known to Forum; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

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In 76 A.D., Emperor Vespasianus Augustus and Titus Caesar Vespasianus were the Roman Consuls.
SH89775. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 V870 (R2), RSC II 59b var. (eagle left with head right), BnF III V166 var. (same), BMCRE II V191 var. (same), SRCV I 2438 var. (same), gVF, superb portrait, slightly off center, weight 3.324 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 76 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS (counterclockwise), laureate head right; reverse eagle standing slightly left on garlanded cippus, thunderbolt in claws, head right, wings open, COS - V flanking across field; ex Tauler & Fau (Madrid) auction 14 (2 Oct 2018), 2405; extremely rare; ON LAYAWAY


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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NEP RED on the reverse abbreviates Neptuno Redux, Neptune who brings back the Emperor in safety by sea. Hadrian toured Greece, 124 - 125, made a detour to Sicily, and returned to Italy in 126. This type honors Neptune for ensuring Hadrian's safety during his sea voyages.
RB88005. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 651, BMCRE III 1318, Cohen II 980, SRCV II 3612, Hunter II 438 var. (dolphin vice acrostolium), VF, well centered, nice style, Tiber patina, edge cracks, weight 22.893 g, maximum diameter 33.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 126 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Neptune standing right, left knee bend and left foot on prow, nude but for cloak over left thigh, trident vertical with head down behind in right hand, acrostolium in left hand, NEP - RED / S - C in two divided lines across field; ex William Rosenblum, mailbid sale 38C (5 Jun 2008), lot 120; SOLD


Agrippa, Military Commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero

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First commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus, the Pantheon was a temple dedicated to all the gods of ancient Rome. Hadrian rebuilt it in 126 A.D. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 meters (142 ft. It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda." The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda.Pantheon on Wikipedia
RB89518. Copper as, RIC I Gaius 58, BMCRE II Tiberius 161, BnF II Caligula 77, Hunter I 1, Cohen I 3, SRCV I 1812, aVF/F, nice portrait, broad flan, brown tone, light marks, slight porosity, weight 10.316 g, maximum diameter 27.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under his grandson Caligula, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing facing, head left, nude but for cloak draped over arms, dolphin in right hand, trident vertical in left hand, large S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; SOLD


Agrippa, Military Commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero

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First commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus, the Pantheon was a temple dedicated to all the gods of ancient Rome. Hadrian rebuilt it in 126 A.D. The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 meters (142 ft. It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda." The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda.Pantheon on Wikipedia
RB91303. Copper as, RIC I Gaius 58, BMCRE II Tiberius 161, BnF II Caligula 77, Hunter I 1, Cohen I 3, SRCV I 1812, aVF, fantastic portrait, dark patina, a little off center, light marks, weight 11.031 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, struck under his grandson Caligula, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing facing, head left, nude but for cloak draped over arms, dolphin in right hand, trident vertical in left hand, large S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; SOLD


Ostrogothic Kingdom, City of Rome, Municipal Coinage, 493 - 518 A.D.

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This City of Rome municipal coinage 40 nummi was struck during the reign of Theoderic the Great, king of the Ostrogoths (475 - 526). Theoderic controlled an empire stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Adriatic Sea. He kept good relations between Ostrogoths and Romans, maintained a Roman legal administration and oversaw a flourishing scholarly culture and the largest building program in Italy in 100 years. The Palace of Domitian on the Palatine Hill was reconstructed, the city walls were rebuilt, and the Senate's Curia, the Theater of Pompey, the city aqueducts, sewers and a granary were refurbished and repaired.
ME89614. Bronze 40 nummi, MEC I 109, cf. Metlich COI 76a (AE30), Hahn MIB I Ostgoten 74a (same); BMC Vandals p. 102, 6 (same), VF, dark patina with highlighting red earthen deposits, struck on tight flan, weight 4.047 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse INVICTA ROMA (invincible Rome), helmeted and draped bust of Roma right; reverse eagle standing left, head turned back looking right, XL (mark of value, upward L reverse) lower left field, uncertain Greek letter (officina number) between pellets in exergue; ex Roman Numismatics e-sale 53, lot 990; ex North American private collection; very rare; SOLD


Ostrogoth Kingdom in Italy, Theoderic the Great, 493 - 526 A.D.

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Theoderic the Great was king of the Ostrogoths, ruler of Italy, regent of the Visigoths, and a patricius of the Roman Empire. As ruler of the combined Gothic realms, Theoderic controlled an empire stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Adriatic Sea.Map526
ME88952. Bronze decanummium, Metlich COI 77; Hahn MIB I pl. 40, 76; BMC 34, 35, Kraus 1, Tolstoi 644, Ratto 2377 (rare), MEC I -, VF, dark brown patina, rough, small flan, weight 1.995 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 493 - 518 A.D.; obverse FELIX RAVENNA, crowned bust of Ravenna right; reverse eagle standing left on branch, head left, wings open, star left and star right, X (mark of value) in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 238 (11 Aug 2010), lot 649; rare; ON LAYAWAY


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D.

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In 9 A.D. three Roman legions were ambushed and massacred by the Germans in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.
RB41256. Copper as, RIC I A469, BMCRE I A271, BnF I A878, Cohen I 27, Hunter I A120, SRCV I 1755, aVF, weight 10.527 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 10 - 11 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR AVGVST F IMPERAT V, laureate head right; reverse PONTIFEX TRIBVN POTESTATE XII (priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 12 years), large S C (senatus consulto); SOLD


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS88843. Silver denarius, Woytek 278b, RIC II 118, RSC II 85, BMCRE III 281, BnF IV 257, Strack I 144, Choice aVF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, weight 3.326 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 210o, Rome mint, c. 108 - 109 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P, laureate head right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse COS V P P S P Q R OPTIMO PRINC, Aequitas standing facing, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1047; SOLD




  




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Byzantine Rome